CollectionsQuake
IN THE NEWS

Quake

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A minor earthquake occurred near Downingtown on Sunday evening, possibly triggered by activity at a nearby quarry, Columbia University scientists said Monday. The magnitude of the quake was measured at 2.7 and there were no reports of damage or injury, according to Patty Mains, a spokeswoman for the Chester County Department of Emergency Services. The quake occurred at 6:25 p.m. with an epicenter in the north end of East Bradford Township - about a mile south of a quarry owned by Lehigh Hanson Inc. in East Caln Township.
NEWS
August 26, 2011 | By Eric Tucker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The nation's capital has prepared for emergencies with sleek communication systems, intelligence fusion centers, and chemical-detection centers at train stations. But what showed during the 5.8-magnitude quake that shook much of the East Coast on Tuesday was that evacuating in an emergency could tax the city's resources - and be decidedly complex and slow. Traffic was snarled for miles downtown as employers released workers early at the same time, and thousands tried to drive home or cram onto trains already overloaded and slowed by speed restrictions because of the quake.
NEWS
February 24, 2003 | INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
More than 1,000 homes and school buildings were toppled when an earthquake measuring 6.8 on the Richter scale rocked China's northwestern region of Xinjiang today, the official Xinhua news agency said. Xinhua said at least 42 people were killed, but a local seismological official said the latest death toll was 94. "We're still compiling figures for the number of injured," Zhang Yong, director of disaster prevention for the Xinjiang Seismology Bureau, said by telephone. Another official said more than 200 people had been injured.
NEWS
January 15, 1990 | By NEAL PEIRCE
The star performer during and after October's killer earthquake here was the Bay Area Rapid Transit's 71.5-mile automated rail system. Riders in a BART train passing through the system's 3.6-mile tube under San Francisco Bay, at the moment the 7.1 Richter scale quake struck, felt scarcely a tremor. BART engineers, armed with spotlights and flashlights, checked every structure on the system. The damage they discovered, on a system consciously designed to withstand an earthquake as massive as San Francisco's legendary 1906 upheaval, was largely cosmetic.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
The little guys outslugged the behemoths covering the California earthquake Tuesday night, as San Francisco's local TV news teams and a cable sports channel made the big broadcast networks look silly. While Tom Brokaw was interviewing a myopic architecture expert from Virginia Tech University and Dan Rather was chatting with a geologist from Columbia, KGO-TV had cameras trained on a collapsed elevator shaft at the San Francisco Amfac Hotel and KCRA-TV interviewed a paramedic who had just pulled a body from a collapsed building.
NEWS
January 18, 2010
RE YOUR editorial "Helping Haiti: Don't let this be another Katrina," let me explain why this can't be another Katrina: Katrina took place in the U.S., and the citizens of New Orleans were warned well in advance to evacuate the area immediately. The devastation was predicted. It was the choice of residents to stay. Mayor Nagin failed to act on evacuation procedures. We've spent billions on Haiti already, yet the country continued to suffer in hunger and poverty, which meant poorly built homes that only made this disaster worse.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Christopher Bodeen, Associated Press
BEIJING - Rescuers with shovels and sniffer dogs combed through collapsed hillsides Tuesday as the death toll rose to 89 from a strong earthquake in a farming region of northwest China. Five other people were listed as missing and 628 injured in Monday morning's quake near the city of Dingxi in Gansu province. About 123,000 people were affected by the quake, with 31,600 moved to temporary shelters, the provincial earthquake administration said on its website. Almost 2,000 homes were destroyed, and about 22,500 damaged, the administration said.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | By David M. Krakow, Special to The Inquirer
So, you're strolling down the boardwalk of this Monterey Bay town, and you pass the Cocoanut Grove souvenir shops when it hits you: What on earth is that gigantic hole where the miniature golf course used to be? Well, take a look out across the bay toward the Santa Cruz Mountains. The largest peak you see is Loma Prieta. Yes, that Loma Prieta, the site of the epicenter of last October's devastating earthquake. When the earthquake hit, Santa Cruz's largest tourist attraction - the beach and boardwalk - did not emerge unscathed.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | By Selcan Hacaoglu and Suzan Fraser, Associated Press
ERCIS, Turkey - After 48 hours, a miracle emerged from the rubble: a 2-week-old baby girl brought out half-naked but alive from the wreckage of an apartment building toppled by Turkey's devastating earthquake. Rescue workers erupted in cheers and applause Tuesday at the sight of the infant - and again hours later when her mother and grandmother were pulled out, their survival a ray of joy on an otherwise grim day. The death toll from Sunday's 7.2-magnitude quake climbed to at least 459 as desperate survivors fought over aid and blocked aid shipments.
NEWS
October 5, 1993 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For countless years, the villagers of Babalsur had been cursed with a lack of water. Several hours before each dawn, more than half the village's 1,000 people walked two miles to the closest well. The rich brought the water back by bullock cart while the poor carried it back on their heads. When the devastating Indian earthquake leveled every black-stone home in Babalsur on Thursday at 4 a.m., the villagers had already left for the well. They were spared. "We are very lucky people," said Nanuba Bhamrao Gaikwad, a 30-year-old farm laborer.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 19, 2016
MINAMIASO, Japan - The U.S. military prepared to join relief efforts Monday in disaster-stricken areas of southern Japan as authorities struggled to feed and care for tens of thousands of people who sought shelter after two powerful earthquakes that killed at least 42 people. Ten people remained missing Sunday, and rescuers were redoubling search efforts on the southern island of Kyushu, where many areas were cut off by landslides and road and bridge damage. Forecasts for heavy rains, which would make land and collapsed buildings even more unstable, added to the urgency of the searches.
NEWS
February 6, 2016 | By Wally Santana, ASSOCIATED PRESS
TAIPEI, Taiwan - A 6.4-magnitude earthquake struck southern Taiwan early Saturday, toppling at least one high-rise residential building and trapping people inside. A news agency reported that 120 were rescued. Firefighters scrambled to the site with ladders, cranes and other equipment and pulled survivors from the building in the southern city of Tainan, footage from local TV broadcasters showed. It was unclear how many people were trapped inside. Some reports said dozens or scores of people might have been in the building at the time of the collapse.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | BY SAM WOOD & MICHAEL BOREN, Staff Writers
AN F-35C AND AN F-18 that were conducting supersonic testing Thursday may have caused the sonic boom felt across much of the coast of New Jersey, naval officials said. The jets came from the naval air station in Patuxent River, Md. The public affairs office there said that military aircraft routinely conduct test flights offshore in an area called the "Test Track," which "parallels the entire coast of the Delmarva Peninsula. "Test aircraft from the naval air station execute supersonic flights almost daily in the test track, and most of these sonic booms are never felt on land," said spokeswoman Connie Hempel said.
NEWS
January 14, 2016
William A. Del Monte, 109, the last survivor of the devastating San Francisco earthquake and fire of 1906, died Monday at a retirement home in nearby Marin County. He was 11 days shy of his 110th birthday. His niece, Janette Barroca of San Francisco, confirmed his death of natural causes. He'd been doing "great for 109 years old," Barroca said Monday. Mr. Del Monte was just 3 months old when the quake struck, forcing his family into the streets to escape in a horse-drawn buckboard with fire burning on both sides, Barroca said.
NEWS
September 10, 2015 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Columnist
Quake was back at Bok. Daniel "Quake" Gibbons, a proud member of the Class of '93 and an immovable force on the offensive line of the Bok Technical High football team, had read on Facebook about an alumni gathering at a new restaurant atop his alma mater's roof. Gibbons wasn't going to miss it. He was looking forward to busting it up with his old Wildcats teammates, catching up with the cheerleaders, and maybe even running into some of his old auto-body shop teachers. The posting said to bring Bok gear if you had it, so Gibbons, who is 41 and works as a security guard in West Philadelphia, proudly broke out his royal blue 1992 division championship jacket.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Samir Panthi saw television images of the mass destruction from earthquakes in Nepal, his homeland, he didn't sleep for days. The earthquakes April 25 and May 12 took the lives of more than 8,500 and left more than 19,000 injured. Months later, catastrophes such as earthquakes, tsunamis, and typhoons - often in developing nations - have an enormous effect on the labor pool in those countries and their ability to produce asinternational suppliersto customers as far away as Philadelphia, retail experts say. In Nepal's case, handwoven rugs - the country's leading export - and all those involved in the production process were adversely affected.
NEWS
May 19, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Andrew Towne, 33, was eating lunch in a tent at base camp on Mount Everest when the ground beneath him began to sway. He and others scrambled out of the tent, said Towne, a new graduate of the University of Pennsylvania. That's when "we saw this wall of snow descending to the north. " The avalanche that followed would bury large areas of base camp, killing 19 climbers - just a fraction of the devastation in Nepal, where that magnitude-7.8 earthquake on April 25 and a second one on May 12 left more than 8,000 dead and 20,000 injured and destroyed 489,000 homes.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
A minor earthquake occurred near Downingtown on Sunday evening, possibly triggered by activity at a nearby quarry, Columbia University scientists said Monday. The magnitude of the quake was measured at 2.7 and there were no reports of damage or injury, according to Patty Mains, a spokeswoman for the Chester County Department of Emergency Services. The quake occurred at 6:25 p.m. with an epicenter in the north end of East Bradford Township - about a mile south of a quarry owned by Lehigh Hanson Inc. in East Caln Township.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Christopher Bodeen, Associated Press
BEIJING - Rescuers with shovels and sniffer dogs combed through collapsed hillsides Tuesday as the death toll rose to 89 from a strong earthquake in a farming region of northwest China. Five other people were listed as missing and 628 injured in Monday morning's quake near the city of Dingxi in Gansu province. About 123,000 people were affected by the quake, with 31,600 moved to temporary shelters, the provincial earthquake administration said on its website. Almost 2,000 homes were destroyed, and about 22,500 damaged, the administration said.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
In 1973, when the Philadelphia Orchestra made history in China, Inquirer music critic Daniel Webster was there. Now David Patrick Stearns reports on the 2013 visit, building on this long relationship.   LUSHAN, China - The scenery is lush, rugged, and mountainous, and the inhabitants still use variations on rickshaws that urban China left behind long ago. But as idyllic as it may seem, this is no place to be during an earthquake. Some 120 miles from Sichuan province's capital of Chengdu, Lushan County is set in steep terrain that means there's a long way for things to fall - rocks, large buildings, or already-crumbling homes.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|