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Quaker Oats

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FOOD
July 1, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
You can sow your wild oats - to the tune of $10,000 - if you submit the top recipe in Quaker Oats' "It's the Right Thing to Do" Recipe Contest. Beginning today, the company will accept entries in three categories: Cookies, Desserts and Breads/Muffins. To be eligible, your recipe must be original and contain at least one (uncooked) cup of quick or old-fashioned Quaker Oats. Include proof of purchase, either a UPC code or receipt. The top recipes will be kitchen tested and judged by food professionals on taste, convenience, appearance and creativity.
NEWS
November 3, 2012
Arnold Greenberg, 80, who began his career selling pickles and herring from a New York City storefront and went on to become a founder of Snapple, the international beverage giant, died of cancer Friday in Manhattan. In 1972, Mr. Greenberg, who was by then running a health-food store in the East Village, joined forces with two old friends, Leonard Marsh and Hyman Golden, to sell fruit juices to health-food stores. A part-time concern - Mr. Greenberg retained his store, and Marsh and Golden kept the window-washing business they ran together - the juice business performed modestly in its early years.
NEWS
April 25, 1990 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The runty, raspy-voiced cartoon swab with the bulging forearms and the flashing fists has run into gentle but determined opposition from the spiritual kin of William Penn. If members of the Religious Society of Friends - the Quakers - have their way, Popeye the Sailor will become Popeye the Pacifist. Popeye, who once used spinach to turn himself from weakling to superhero, last year went to work for Quaker Oats Co., pitching the firm's instant oatmeal. In cartoon strips packaged with boxes of Instant Quaker Oatmeal, Popeye proclaims himself, "Popeye the Quaker Man. " Last winter, he identified himself the same way in television ads touting the instant oatmeal.
NEWS
August 17, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clarence Sellers Ross 3d, 43, an executive of the Quaker Oats Co., died of cancer Friday at Rush Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago. Mr. Ross, a native of Philadelphia, had lived in Naperville, Ill., since 1990. Mr. Ross was vice president of customer financial services for Quaker Oats. He also had held positions with the company in finance, marketing and sales leadership. Mr. Ross represented the company on the board of directors of the Boys & Girls Club of Chicago as well as on the board of managers of the Martin Luther King Jr. Unit of Chicago.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1994 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
As a marketing tool, Aunt Jemina is considered a success. Her smiling face has beamed from packages of Aunt Jemima pancake mix and other products for more than a century. It has helped establish a line of breakfast foods that generates more than $255 million in annual sales. But she has long been a subject of controversy among African Americans, who don't like the Aunt Jemima image of an overweight, smiling domestic. Quaker Oats Co., which acquired the brand in 1925, has gradually updated the Aunt Jemima image.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1988 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
As recently as last year, even people who liked oatmeal - a distinct breakfast-table minority - rarely asked for its near-cousin, oat bran. Just trying to find a store that stocked the bland cereal was often a challenge. Today, thanks to a couple of medical treatises, a diet book and media coverage, everybody wants oat bran. So much so, in fact, that just trying to find a store that has oat bran in stock is often a challenge. "Overnight, (sales) increased 35-fold. I just couldn't get enough of it," said Frank Puleo, who buys cereals and other products for Genuardi's supermarkets.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Perhaps it is the packaging, John McCann's steel-cut Irish Oatmeal, unrepentently retro in that black-and-white, bemedaled tuxedo of a tin, as sturdy - and weighty - as a quart of old-time wood putty. Philosophically, of course, it presents a dilemma: The carbon footprint of hauling oats a few thousand food miles from green County Kildare cannot, one assumes, be very dainty. But then again, there is so much that can (and shortly will) be said in its favor, not only nutritionally, for sure, but the fact that no animals were harmed in its testing or manufacture: These oats are as whole-food and wholesome as a tinned whole food can be. They are more costly, no question, than Quaker Oats, my childhood stalwart.
NEWS
October 15, 1986 | BY DAVE BARRY
Today we're going to look at some important new developments in the U.S. advertising industry, which continues to be a hotbed of innovation as well as a source of pride to all Americans regardless of intelligence. This country may no longer be capable of manufacturing anything more technologically sophisticated than breakfast cereal, but by God when it comes to advertising, we are still - and I mean this sincerely - Number One. Our first bit of advertising news will come as a happy surprise to those of you who lie awake nights asking yourselves: "Whatever happened to 'Mikey,' the lovable chubby-cheeked child who hated everything until he tasted 'Life' brand breakfast cereal in the heartwarming television commercial that we all saw 63,000 times back in the 1970s?"
NEWS
April 2, 2004 | By MICHAEL P. TREMOGLIE
Quak'er, n. 1. One who quakes. 2. One of a religious sect founded by George Fox, of Leicestershire, England, about 1650, the members of which call themselves Friends. They were called Quakers, originally, in derision. Fox's teaching was primarily a preaching of repentance . . . The trembling among the listening crowd caused or confirmed the name of Quakers. - Dictionary.reference.com IN KEEPING with the current trend to remove all names that are (or could be considered)
FOOD
April 23, 1995 | By Jim Burns, FOR THE INQUIRER
Don't you just hate admitting that something you thought was one way is actually very, very different? For instance, when you thought that the IRS owed you $2,000 only to find out that it was the other way around. Or when you arrived at somebody's house for dinner on a Saturday night and the date was actually next Saturday night. You get the picture. Well, I feel that way about oatmeal. I know that's a bit strange to admit, but, you see, I always thought that oatmeal came in flakes, that it was born that way, nice and thin and flat.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 3, 2012
Arnold Greenberg, 80, who began his career selling pickles and herring from a New York City storefront and went on to become a founder of Snapple, the international beverage giant, died of cancer Friday in Manhattan. In 1972, Mr. Greenberg, who was by then running a health-food store in the East Village, joined forces with two old friends, Leonard Marsh and Hyman Golden, to sell fruit juices to health-food stores. A part-time concern - Mr. Greenberg retained his store, and Marsh and Golden kept the window-washing business they ran together - the juice business performed modestly in its early years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Perhaps it is the packaging, John McCann's steel-cut Irish Oatmeal, unrepentently retro in that black-and-white, bemedaled tuxedo of a tin, as sturdy - and weighty - as a quart of old-time wood putty. Philosophically, of course, it presents a dilemma: The carbon footprint of hauling oats a few thousand food miles from green County Kildare cannot, one assumes, be very dainty. But then again, there is so much that can (and shortly will) be said in its favor, not only nutritionally, for sure, but the fact that no animals were harmed in its testing or manufacture: These oats are as whole-food and wholesome as a tinned whole food can be. They are more costly, no question, than Quaker Oats, my childhood stalwart.
NEWS
April 2, 2004 | By MICHAEL P. TREMOGLIE
Quak'er, n. 1. One who quakes. 2. One of a religious sect founded by George Fox, of Leicestershire, England, about 1650, the members of which call themselves Friends. They were called Quakers, originally, in derision. Fox's teaching was primarily a preaching of repentance . . . The trembling among the listening crowd caused or confirmed the name of Quakers. - Dictionary.reference.com IN KEEPING with the current trend to remove all names that are (or could be considered)
LIVING
May 21, 2000 | By Gwen Florio, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania's official nickname might be the Keystone State, but when people say Quaker State, we know they're talking about us - the same way when we see a Quaker City cab, we know it's from Philadelphia. "Quaker" is the area's unofficial moniker, used by everything from manufacturers (Quaker Oats) to social clubs (the Quaker City String Band) to sports teams. Most of us know that the name is popular around here because the city and state were founded by William Penn, a Quaker.
SPORTS
March 3, 1999 | by Dick Jerardi, Daily News Sports Writer
Three weeks ago, the final moments must have seemed like torture. The Palestra walls were closing in. A basketball game that couldn't be lost was going to be lost. And, for the Penn players, there was no escape. Three Tuesdays later, the final moments were about competing chants of "NIT" and "SAT. " You figure out who was yelling what. The Jadwin Gym stands were emptying. With two minutes left, Princeton coach Bill Carmody waved the white flag when he removed his gallant seniors, Brian Earl and Gabe Lewullis.
NEWS
August 17, 1998 | By Thomas J. Brady, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Clarence Sellers Ross 3d, 43, an executive of the Quaker Oats Co., died of cancer Friday at Rush Presbyterian Hospital in Chicago. Mr. Ross, a native of Philadelphia, had lived in Naperville, Ill., since 1990. Mr. Ross was vice president of customer financial services for Quaker Oats. He also had held positions with the company in finance, marketing and sales leadership. Mr. Ross represented the company on the board of directors of the Boys & Girls Club of Chicago as well as on the board of managers of the Martin Luther King Jr. Unit of Chicago.
FOOD
April 23, 1995 | By Jim Burns, FOR THE INQUIRER
Don't you just hate admitting that something you thought was one way is actually very, very different? For instance, when you thought that the IRS owed you $2,000 only to find out that it was the other way around. Or when you arrived at somebody's house for dinner on a Saturday night and the date was actually next Saturday night. You get the picture. Well, I feel that way about oatmeal. I know that's a bit strange to admit, but, you see, I always thought that oatmeal came in flakes, that it was born that way, nice and thin and flat.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1994 | by Jenice M. Armstrong, Daily News Staff Writer
As a marketing tool, Aunt Jemina is considered a success. Her smiling face has beamed from packages of Aunt Jemima pancake mix and other products for more than a century. It has helped establish a line of breakfast foods that generates more than $255 million in annual sales. But she has long been a subject of controversy among African Americans, who don't like the Aunt Jemima image of an overweight, smiling domestic. Quaker Oats Co., which acquired the brand in 1925, has gradually updated the Aunt Jemima image.
BUSINESS
July 12, 1992 | By Terry Bivens, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
First, some Gatorade trivia: Michael Jordan, the high-flying prince of the city and global emissary for Gatorade, actually drinks the stuff. The Chicago Bulls basketball star was recently observed brown-bagging his favorite flavor, citrus cooler, at one of Chicago's tonier restaurants. Americans currently drink about 200 million gallons of Gatorade a year. No, that won't fill Lake Michigan. But it does buoy owner Quaker Oats Co.'s annual sales by more than $700 million.
FOOD
July 1, 1992 | Daily News Wire Services
You can sow your wild oats - to the tune of $10,000 - if you submit the top recipe in Quaker Oats' "It's the Right Thing to Do" Recipe Contest. Beginning today, the company will accept entries in three categories: Cookies, Desserts and Breads/Muffins. To be eligible, your recipe must be original and contain at least one (uncooked) cup of quick or old-fashioned Quaker Oats. Include proof of purchase, either a UPC code or receipt. The top recipes will be kitchen tested and judged by food professionals on taste, convenience, appearance and creativity.
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