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NEWS
April 6, 1992 | SANDRA M. GILBERT AND SUSAN GUBAR, From the New York Times
In 1979 we dramatized the dilemma of 19th century women, especially women writers, through a discussion of "Snow White. " There was a good Queen who pricked her finger with a needle, watched blood fall on snow, gave birth to a girl, died and was replaced by a wicked Queen, who became stepmother to Snow White. When a mother figure becomes self-assertive in a society that discourages independence, we suggested in our analysis of the story, it is as if the good mother dies and is replaced by a wicked stepmother.
NEWS
March 1, 1999 | DAVID MAIALETTI/ DAILY NEWS
Brian Assanowicz and Victoria Baldwin, the Scrapplefest King and Queen, wave to loyal subjects yesterday at the Electric Factory. The two were chosen to preside over the festival, hosted by WWDB-FM Radio, which is designed to celebrate the unique culinary item. The three-hour afternoon event featured samples of original scrapple recipes. Hatfield Quality Meats, which produces several kinds of scrapple, presented Mayor Rendell with a bust of himself made by students at Moore College of Art. It was cast in scrapple.
NEWS
May 7, 2007 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Elizabeth II enjoyed the Kentucky Derby, but the real queen of England was at the Electric Factory on Saturday night. Her name is Amy Winehouse, and she is nothing short of a nouveau soul sensation. Her breakthrough album, Back To Black, with its clever postmodern amalgam of '60s soul, Motown and Spectorian girl groups, is currently blowing up in all formats. Before the show, the sold-out crowd at the Electric Factory just kept their fingers crossed that Winehouse would show - Fleet Street, in its inimitable tradition of creating media icons and then destroying them, currently is painting Winehouse as boozy and unstable - but she not only showed up, she showed plenty.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | By NANCY M. REICHARDT, Special to the Daily News
When the character of Amanda Cory reappears on "Another World" the week of July 27, she won't be recognizable to the show's longtime audience. "Little" Amanda (she was about 9 when she disappeared from the small screen) is now "big" Amanda, who will be returning home from boarding school. Portraying Amanda is daytime newcomer Sandi Ferguson. Although Ferguson is new to soaps, and this is her first recurring acting role, she's used to performing in front of an audience. You see, she was named Miss Western Pennsylvania and participated in the 1984 Miss Teen U.S.A.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun Paul Anderson of the Inquirer Washington Bureau and Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
President Bush took the queen of England out to the ballgame here last night. The Memorial Stadium fairly swayed in excitement. The bare spots on the field were gone. The chalking of the diamond was perfect. The sun seemed to hang in the evening sky a little longer. Tony LaRussa, the manager of the Oakland Athletics, said before the game: "I think everybody is aware that there will be two couples here tonight who are different from the rest of us. " In her first look at the national pastime, the queen met the players before the game and then took a seat in an upper-deck box enclosed in bulletproof glass.
NEWS
October 28, 2003 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is 11 a.m., the crack of dawn for royalty, but the Queen of Soul has already ascended her throne. She's powdered, ponytailed, and poised to meet her subjects. In the world of pop music, the word diva is tossed around like a chewed-up Frisbee, and icon is as played-out as a Madonna makeover. However, there is but one queen, and it's not Mary J. Blige. "I really don't see the similarity," Aretha Franklin replies dismissively when asked to compare her style with that of Blige, known as the Queen of Hip-Hop.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2007 | By Glenn Whipp LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS
I never thought I'd say this . . . but here goes. I miss Meg Ryan. Especially this time of year, when soggy romantic comedies starring the likes of Mandy Moore (!) remind us that since Ryan abdicated her throne with 2001's Kate & Leopold, no actress has come along to make Valentine's Day movie-going safe again. Say what you will about Ryan's twinkly persona, but nobody this side of Doris Day had a longer run as a romantic-comedy queen. And the movies she made - even the misfires - were at least fun. I'd gladly catch Ryan - playing three women, no less - in Joe Versus the Volcano again before watching Sandra Bullock trot out one of her wounded lonely-hearts or enduring an endless string of Renee Zellweger scrunchy faces.
NEWS
June 21, 1990 | By DOROTHY STORCK
I am holding in my hand one of the new five-pound notes the British have just issued to replace the old model. The queen, tightly curled and rampantly tiara-ed on a field of pinkish blue, has been updated from her 1962 persona. "It makes one look so old," Her Majesty is reported to have said. Indeed. There is the double chin, the fleshy fold around the jaw, the line from nose to mouth, the crinkle under the eye. There is the look of a woman past middle age, the girl gone deep inside the sagging flesh with only the eyes to signal that she is still within.
LIVING
September 19, 1995 | By W. Speers This story includes information from the Associated Press, New York Post and New York Daily News
Leona Helmsley has been given another 150 hours of community service by a Manhattan federal judge who found that she had her employees do some of her original 750 hours, ordered for her 1989 tax evasion conviction. A lawyer for the "Queen of Mean" said that she tried to do the hours "in good faith" at a Scottsdale, Ariz., hospital but that it became impossible because hospital staff "gawked at her" and were "less than charitable. " The judge found that it was when she was allowed to do tasks at her home that she "did obtain the help of household employees.
NEWS
June 18, 1987 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Early in The Fool and the Queen, the Czechoslovakian performer Bolek Polivka - during an amiable chat with the audience - refers smilingly to the spectator and "the human here" on the stage. Polivka's smile and the fact that his English is not perfect somewhat vitiates the implication that an audience is somehow less human than the performers they have come to see. As the show develops, however, the "spectator" comes to the conclusion that Polivka knew exactly what he was saying and that the smile might have been meant to deliberately mask the earnestness of his remark.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Grab your wigs and fake boobs, guys: The glitter is in the audience for Divine/Intervention . The onstage show, which just opened at a nightclub called Voyeur (dark, dark, dark, with gigantic lavender-lit chandeliers), is actually a serious and often moving bio-drama about the counterculture icon known as Divine. Divine's real name was Glenn Milstead, a fat, unhappy kid from a middle-class home in Baltimore. How he wound up starring in John Waters' schlock/shock movies - where he was raped by a giant lobster in Multiple Maniacs , and ate a dog turd in Pink Flamingos , and made it mainstream big in Hairspray - is incidental here.
NEWS
July 10, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Lloyd Cole is a richly cultured British singer-songwriter who broke out of the jagged post-punk movement of the 1980s with a peculiar brand of wry, erudite guitar pop with more literary references than The New York Review of Books. Cole formed the Commotions in 1982. They released their first album in 1984 and by 1987, he'd busted up the band and gone solo. If that story, and Cole's bookish gestalt sound eerily similar to that of The Smiths and Morrissey, well, there you go. At the very least, Cole is still an emotional yet cool highbrow, and his fans still love him for it, evidenced by Tuesday's acoustic show at World Café Live.
NEWS
June 26, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
CLARENCE QUEEN was a man of many talents. He could restore an antique car, remodel a house, sing professionally and make unique sculptures that won prizes. Clarence used his knowledge of auto mechanics and auto restoration to create sculptures out of auto parts and other discarded material, which were exhibited in Philadelphia and New York City galleries. "I fell in love with his art when I first saw it," said Marilyn Kai Jewett, who worked with Clarence to promote his art. "I had never seen anything like it. Clarence was a very unique sculptor.
FOOD
May 8, 2015 | By Michael Klein, For The Inquirer
No need to twist your tongue trying out Dhanapalan Perumalsamy Sankaralingam's given name. He goes simply by Paul Samy. The owner of Cafe Spice Express at Liberty Place, he plans to bring the tastes of South India to Queen Village later this month.  Imli Indian Kitchen , a BYOB, will take the corner spot at Catharine Street and East Passyunk Avenue that formerly housed Ulivo. Imli is Hindi for tamarind. Sabrina's Cafe , the quartet of bruncheries, plans a Collingswood location in mid-August at 714 Haddon Ave., the former Woolworth's store that has been a veritable revolving door for restaurants and was a short-lived boutique market last winter.
NEWS
May 8, 2015 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fetty Wap had me at "Hey, what's up, hello. " I've watched the New Jersey rapper's hit "Trap Queen" crawl from underneath sweaty house parties to constant radio rotation, hitting No. 3 on Billboard's Hot 100. It's been remixed and hilariously rebutted in viral videos and Vines. On Tuesday night, he performed along Philly's the Roots on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon . The trap is where most drug deals go down, and Wap's Trap Queen is the loyal lady at his side.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2015 | By Alexander Kacala, For The Inquirer
A painted sign at the bar of Bob and Barbara's Lounge on South Street reads, "Respect Our Queens. " The walls are covered in Pabst Blue Ribbon memorabilia like something straight out of a 99-cent store. It's 11:15 p.m. exactly and the DJ launches the opening track for the show. Most drag shows start late. Not this one. Among tables covered with crushed beer cans and used shot glasses, a woman in a simple long, elegant black dress that leaves nothing to the imagination ascends from the basement stairs and onto the small stage.
NEWS
March 12, 2015 | BY WILLIAM BENDER, Daily News Staff Writer benderw@phillynews.com, 215-854-5255
STATE REP. Louise Williams Bishop has tried mightily to distance herself from the Lancaster Avenue Redevelopment Corp. She refused to answer questions about her ties to the floundering nonprofit when the Daily News dug into its finances last year. But the tape don't lie. Bishop, 81, a minister and longtime gospel-radio host, not only pocketed $1,500 from lobbyist-turned-informant Tyron Ali, but also was recorded in 2010 trying to get Ali to steer business to a LARC-owned property in West Philadelphia, according to the grand-jury presentment released yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Queen Bey kicks off vegan biz Cavort in delighted bliss, oh, ye healthy eaters! Beyoncé has come to your rescue - including here in Philly! With her trainer and biz partner Marco Borges , Bey has just started 22 Days Nutrition, a home-delivery vegan food service. And they deliver to Philly, yo! Meals run between $9 and $15, and they tell us they're pure, good stuff, fresh, never frozen, much like Bey her lovely self. Bey and hub Jay Z went famously vegan for a time in 2013, Instagramming their food, even (but what filters did they use?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
No one needed to remind the audience at the Kimmel Center on Monday that Aretha Franklin, 72, is the reigning Queen of Soul - not the T-shirt vendors or the announcer by the side of the stage. From the first notes of Jackie Wilson's upbeat "(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher and Higher" to the night's playful finale, Franklin's voice showed subtlety, grace, and strength - hallmarks of her continued majesty. Aficionados who have witnessed erratic performances and late starts were pleased that Franklin hit the stage minutes after 8 p.m., ready to sing.
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