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Queen Silvia

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NEWS
April 13, 1988 | Special to the Daily News by Scott Weiner
King Carl Gustaf XVI and Queen Silvia of Sweden arrive at Fort Christina Park in Wilmington this morning, re-enacting the landing of colonists from Sweden 350 years ago.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
The crowd of more than 900 people clapped hands and waved blue and yellow Swedish flags as two whirlybirds landed at the Academy of the New Church in Bryn Athyn. But that was just practice for the crowd, as members of the Swedish press and Swedish and U.S. secret service agents alighted from the helicopters. "I want to see the queen!" chanted kindergartners from the Bryn Athyn Church School. Seconds later, a third whirlybird touched down and Queen Silvia of Sweden emerged.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
It was a sweet hangover. It was the morning after the gloriously sunny afternoon when the helicopter carrying Queen Silvia of Sweden vanished over Bryn Athyn's verdant hills, towering cathedral, sprawling church campus and hundreds of toney suburban ranch homes after the queen's two-hour visit to the Montgomery County community. She left the residents with vivid memories after the teary goodbyes. What cherishable memories they are. And what a harried week of preparation it was. "Oh, brother," said Bryn Athyn police Chief Mason Adams on Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | By Ellen O'Brien Roy H. Campbell and Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
He held up his hand in a crisp salute. She held up her hand to steady her hat. In the cold wind off the river, where more than 1,000 had gathered for a sight of royalty, noblesse obliged. King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden arrived at Fort Christina Park in Wilmington yesterday morning for a brisk round of visits throughout the region that included five stops in Wilmington, two in Philadelphia and one in Bryn Athyn to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the founding of the first Swedish colony in America.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It should have been an awkward moment. The king and queen of Sweden stood Friday afternoon in Independence Hall as a National Park Service ranger described the tyrannies of King George III of Britain, and the work of patriots who shucked off a monarch. But the royals nodded and smiled as they stood steps from where the colonists shed a king, gracious and polite. What do you call a king standing in a room where aristocracy was famously shunned? "Irony," Park Service superintendent Cynthia MacLeod later said.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since leaving her Swedish homeland in 1904, Hertha Swanson has forgotten the language, but her knowledge of royal etiquette has remained intact. As one of the oldest Swedish natives in the Delaware Valley, Swanson, 100, was selected by the Delaware Trust Co. in Wilmington to participate in ceremonies honoring the visit of King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden. The royal couple began their two-day visit to the Delaware Valley yesterday as part of a 17-day tour of the United States.
NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Malin Rising, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Swedish Princess Madeleine fell in love in the Big Apple. Now she has said "yes" to New York banker Christopher O'Neill in a lavish and emotional wedding ceremony in Stockholm. Madeleine, 30, was wearing a stunning silk organza dress with a lace top and 13-foot trail, designed by Valentino Garavani, when she tied the knot with British-American O'Neill on Saturday. In addition to celebrities and New York socialites, the guests included the United Kingdom's earl and countess of Wessex, Prince Edward and Sophie; Princess Takamado of Japan; and princes and princesses from Norway, Denmark, Greece, Luxembourg, and Monaco.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the majestic halls of a grand stone mansion that rises from verdant fields off Pattison Avenue, the American Swedish Historical Museum's small but dedicated staff has been preparing to welcome the king and queen. Calmly. Very calmly. "We're excited," said Tracey Rae Beck, the museum's executive director. The fervor, however, was mostly internal. The only sound floating through the high-ceilinged galleries Thursday morning - only 28 hours before the royals' scheduled arrival - was the mellifluent Swedish conversation that Birgitta Davis was having on the phone.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | By Ellen O'Brien and Chris Conway, Inquirer Staff Writers The Associated Press contributed to this report
The city of Bridgeton presented its heart yesterday under heavy morning skies to a woman in peach and her husband in gray, who rode into its midst in a carriage and left in a limousine. King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden, who were long anticipated by the Cumberland County municipality of 18,000, were treated to an hour of homespun hospitality and a trip through a replica of a Swedish colonial farm - the Swedish Farmstead Museum, which officially opened yesterday - to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the first European settlement, by Swedes and Finns, in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | By Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer Reuters and the Associated Press contributed to this report
A former mental patient broke into Sweden's royal palace yesterday, smashing antique Chinese urns and breaking down doors before he was arrested. King Carl XVI Gustaf, Queen Silvia and their three children were in southeastern Sweden on vacation at the time. "What is most serious is that the man was able to move all over the castle, even into the apartment of the royal family," a police spokesman told reporters in Sweden. Swedish reports said that the 36-year-old man, who was not identified, was incoherent when arrested at the 17th-century Drottningholm Royal Palace, about 10 miles west of Stockholm.
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NEWS
June 9, 2013 | By Malin Rising, Associated Press
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Swedish Princess Madeleine fell in love in the Big Apple. Now she has said "yes" to New York banker Christopher O'Neill in a lavish and emotional wedding ceremony in Stockholm. Madeleine, 30, was wearing a stunning silk organza dress with a lace top and 13-foot trail, designed by Valentino Garavani, when she tied the knot with British-American O'Neill on Saturday. In addition to celebrities and New York socialites, the guests included the United Kingdom's earl and countess of Wessex, Prince Edward and Sophie; Princess Takamado of Japan; and princes and princesses from Norway, Denmark, Greece, Luxembourg, and Monaco.
NEWS
May 12, 2013 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
It should have been an awkward moment. The king and queen of Sweden stood Friday afternoon in Independence Hall as a National Park Service ranger described the tyrannies of King George III of Britain, and the work of patriots who shucked off a monarch. But the royals nodded and smiled as they stood steps from where the colonists shed a king, gracious and polite. What do you call a king standing in a room where aristocracy was famously shunned? "Irony," Park Service superintendent Cynthia MacLeod later said.
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the majestic halls of a grand stone mansion that rises from verdant fields off Pattison Avenue, the American Swedish Historical Museum's small but dedicated staff has been preparing to welcome the king and queen. Calmly. Very calmly. "We're excited," said Tracey Rae Beck, the museum's executive director. The fervor, however, was mostly internal. The only sound floating through the high-ceilinged galleries Thursday morning - only 28 hours before the royals' scheduled arrival - was the mellifluent Swedish conversation that Birgitta Davis was having on the phone.
FOOD
October 9, 1996 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
Savvy restaurant chefs check their reservation books each day to see if any VIPs are due for lunch or dinner. Ulrika Bengtsson doesn't have to do that. When you cook for a consulate, every guest who comes to dine is a VIP. For almost five years, this unflappable, ponytailed 30-year-old has been the head chef - and entire kitchen staff - at the Swedish Consulate in Manhattan. She has prepared meals for King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia, as well as for Nobel laureates. On any given day, she must segue from a serious diplomatic lunch for two to a festive dinner buffet for 50 hosted by Consul General Dag Sebastian Ahlander and his wife, Gunilla von Argin.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | By Bill Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer Reuters and the Associated Press contributed to this report
A former mental patient broke into Sweden's royal palace yesterday, smashing antique Chinese urns and breaking down doors before he was arrested. King Carl XVI Gustaf, Queen Silvia and their three children were in southeastern Sweden on vacation at the time. "What is most serious is that the man was able to move all over the castle, even into the apartment of the royal family," a police spokesman told reporters in Sweden. Swedish reports said that the 36-year-old man, who was not identified, was incoherent when arrested at the 17th-century Drottningholm Royal Palace, about 10 miles west of Stockholm.
NEWS
January 30, 1989 | By Ellen O'Brien, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Owens-Illinois Co. finally closed its glass-bottling factory here, after years of cutting its workforce in the early 1980s. By then, this small, hilly, hard-pressed city of less than 20,000 had gradually lost about 3,000 jobs at the Owens plant and had seen most of the vegetable processors in South Jersey shut their plants, too. Even the area's farms, with the seasonal jobs, had begun devolving into real estate. When Owens made its exit, that appeared to be the last ax for Bridgeton's hopes for better economic days.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1988 | By Robert Weiss, Special to The Inquirer
King Carl Gustaf XVI and Queen Silvia of Sweden have returned home after a 17-day cross-country tour of the United States, and the red carpets have been returned to storage. But the 350th anniversary celebration of the first Swedish colony in the New World - New Sweden - has just begun, and the main attractions are in the Philadelphia area. And why not? The colony, which existed from 1638 to 1655, stretched from south of Trenton through the entire state of Delaware. Here are some of the observances: LET'S PARTY!
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
It was a sweet hangover. It was the morning after the gloriously sunny afternoon when the helicopter carrying Queen Silvia of Sweden vanished over Bryn Athyn's verdant hills, towering cathedral, sprawling church campus and hundreds of toney suburban ranch homes after the queen's two-hour visit to the Montgomery County community. She left the residents with vivid memories after the teary goodbyes. What cherishable memories they are. And what a harried week of preparation it was. "Oh, brother," said Bryn Athyn police Chief Mason Adams on Thursday afternoon.
NEWS
April 15, 1988 | By Ellen O'Brien and Chris Conway, Inquirer Staff Writers The Associated Press contributed to this report
The city of Bridgeton presented its heart yesterday under heavy morning skies to a woman in peach and her husband in gray, who rode into its midst in a carriage and left in a limousine. King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia of Sweden, who were long anticipated by the Cumberland County municipality of 18,000, were treated to an hour of homespun hospitality and a trip through a replica of a Swedish colonial farm - the Swedish Farmstead Museum, which officially opened yesterday - to celebrate the 350th anniversary of the first European settlement, by Swedes and Finns, in the Philadelphia area.
NEWS
April 14, 1988 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer
The crowd of more than 900 people clapped hands and waved blue and yellow Swedish flags as two whirlybirds landed at the Academy of the New Church in Bryn Athyn. But that was just practice for the crowd, as members of the Swedish press and Swedish and U.S. secret service agents alighted from the helicopters. "I want to see the queen!" chanted kindergartners from the Bryn Athyn Church School. Seconds later, a third whirlybird touched down and Queen Silvia of Sweden emerged.
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