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Quiet Corner

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NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, FOR THE INQUIRER
ANGKOR, Cambodia — We bounced along the road in a tuk-tuk — picture a rickshaw attached to a moped — anxious for our first glimpse through the trees of the temple of Angkor Wat. Our imaginations flared with visions of hacking our way through the overgrown jungle, then quietly discovering the nearly 900-year-old stone towers with only a solitary monkey looking on. Perhaps we've watched too many Indiana Jones movies. Angkor is the largest, and perhaps most exotic, religious complex in the world.
NEWS
October 30, 1996 | For The Inquirer / MICHAEL PLUNKETT
On a quiet corner in a quiet all-American town, one family has carved a tradition - not to mention many a pumpkin. Since 1968, Agnes Nolte of Maple Shade has taken over Halloween with her creations. Now, with help from her proudest creations - her 12 children - she livens up County and Sunset Avenues.
NEWS
September 21, 2007 | By Joy Deangdeelert Cho, For the Inquirer
The best pieces for the home combine function with style. On top of that, these new favorites of mine are just plain cool. - Joy Deangdeelert Cho From Zeisel, with flair Eva Zeisel's signature whimsical lines are displayed beautifully in the legendary designer's special-edition coffee table for Design Within Reach ($1,500). Order at 1710 Walnut St. or www.dwr.com . When the occasion calls for additional seating, add a splash of color and wild florals with Missoni Home's Alice pouf ($380)
SPORTS
September 16, 1987 | By JAY GREENBERG, Daily News Sports Writer
Team Canada's victory parade, alas, will not go up Broad Street. Brian Propp and Rick Tocchet were feted this morning in civic ceremonies from their coach seats on a 9 a.m. flight home. But seeing the two Flyers curled up together in a relatively quiet corner of the champagne-soaked locker room, passing a bottle after winning the Canada Cup last night, was very much a Philadelphia moment. Propp has been to the Stanley Cup finals three times in his eight Flyer seasons and Tocchet twice in his three.
NEWS
December 22, 2007 | By Lea Sitton Stanley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ssshhh! The Comcast Center is open. Sorta. Comcast corporate isn't officially talking yet about the move-in at Philadelphia's tallest building, the 57-story glass tower that is expected to be completed in 2008. But quietly, shortly after Thanksgiving, workers began moving in, handfuls by the week. Some enter through the front of the building at 17th and JFK, crossing the wide floor in the glassed-in lobby, visible to passersby on the street. Others enter through double-glass doors tucked in a quiet corner of Suburban Station, where a small sign says "To Comcast Center Lobby.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | By Barbara Claire Kasselmann, FOR THE INQUIRER
A funny thing happened on the way to the Nudist Club. We got lost in aisles full of antiques, stopped for old-fashioned pit barbecue, bought bags of corn and tomatoes at farmstands and checked out the graves of Revolutionary War soldiers. By the time we'd polished off our ice cream cones at a country dairy barn, it was too dark to find the original object of our search. Oh, well, some other day? A while back, I had read about a family nudist club in northeastern Connecticut, and finding it among the scenic hills became a point of interest for our family travelers.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
When State Rep. Dave Richardson died in August, he left a pretty big dashiki to fill. Last night, John Myers - a protege of the barrel-chested, Afro-centric champion of the downtrodden - won the right to try it on for size. Myers, 47, backed by the Democratic Party, swamped three other candidates and will serve out the final year of Richardson's term in the 201st District, which covers parts of Germantown, Mount Airy and West Oak Lane. But independent candidate Veronica Joyner, a distant second last night, wants to take Myers to the cleaners before then.
NEWS
September 10, 1992
DEATH OF A COP: IN THE SHADOW OF A BADGE, HEARTBEAT IS STILLED In a quiet corner, photographs line the lobby walls of the Police Administration Building at 8th and Race Sts. - photographs of police officers killed in performance of their sworn duty; faces mourned by those who loved them and those who share in their chosen profession; faces time has quickly eliminated from the violent headlines that told of their deaths. Within the shadow of the badge beats a heartbeat. When we encounter emergencies, we depend on those who form the shadows and the heartbeats.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
If the "Accident Waiting to Happen" Club ever needs a poster boy, Marple Newtown's Gary Morrison could handle the job with ease. As a sophomore the Tigers' runner suffered a knee injury that required surgery. As a junior he missed the indoor season with another leg problem and broke his ankle the first month of outdoor competition. This year was just as bad. An injury in the fall during cross-country ended his season and delayed his indoor season until about a month ago. To date he has yet to make it to the end of a cross-country, indoor or outdoor season without suffering a crippling injury.
NEWS
February 29, 1988 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
At Friday night's Meet of Champions, Penn Wood's Bill Coleman surprisingly found himself the Patriots' sole representative in the six-man finals of the 60-yard hurdles. Going into the meet at Lehigh University, which brought together the top performers from the indoor season, Penn Wood had four runners ranked in the area's top six. Andy Holloway was tops. Adrian Johnson was ranked third, Coleman fifth and Steve Branche sixth. In the first event, the 880 relay, Johnson pulled a muscle running the leadoff leg and scratched from the hurdles.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2012 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, FOR THE INQUIRER
ANGKOR, Cambodia — We bounced along the road in a tuk-tuk — picture a rickshaw attached to a moped — anxious for our first glimpse through the trees of the temple of Angkor Wat. Our imaginations flared with visions of hacking our way through the overgrown jungle, then quietly discovering the nearly 900-year-old stone towers with only a solitary monkey looking on. Perhaps we've watched too many Indiana Jones movies. Angkor is the largest, and perhaps most exotic, religious complex in the world.
NEWS
December 22, 2007 | By Lea Sitton Stanley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ssshhh! The Comcast Center is open. Sorta. Comcast corporate isn't officially talking yet about the move-in at Philadelphia's tallest building, the 57-story glass tower that is expected to be completed in 2008. But quietly, shortly after Thanksgiving, workers began moving in, handfuls by the week. Some enter through the front of the building at 17th and JFK, crossing the wide floor in the glassed-in lobby, visible to passersby on the street. Others enter through double-glass doors tucked in a quiet corner of Suburban Station, where a small sign says "To Comcast Center Lobby.
NEWS
September 21, 2007 | By Joy Deangdeelert Cho, For the Inquirer
The best pieces for the home combine function with style. On top of that, these new favorites of mine are just plain cool. - Joy Deangdeelert Cho From Zeisel, with flair Eva Zeisel's signature whimsical lines are displayed beautifully in the legendary designer's special-edition coffee table for Design Within Reach ($1,500). Order at 1710 Walnut St. or www.dwr.com . When the occasion calls for additional seating, add a splash of color and wild florals with Missoni Home's Alice pouf ($380)
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | By Barbara Claire Kasselmann, FOR THE INQUIRER
A funny thing happened on the way to the Nudist Club. We got lost in aisles full of antiques, stopped for old-fashioned pit barbecue, bought bags of corn and tomatoes at farmstands and checked out the graves of Revolutionary War soldiers. By the time we'd polished off our ice cream cones at a country dairy barn, it was too dark to find the original object of our search. Oh, well, some other day? A while back, I had read about a family nudist club in northeastern Connecticut, and finding it among the scenic hills became a point of interest for our family travelers.
NEWS
October 30, 1996 | For The Inquirer / MICHAEL PLUNKETT
On a quiet corner in a quiet all-American town, one family has carved a tradition - not to mention many a pumpkin. Since 1968, Agnes Nolte of Maple Shade has taken over Halloween with her creations. Now, with help from her proudest creations - her 12 children - she livens up County and Sunset Avenues.
NEWS
November 8, 1995 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
When State Rep. Dave Richardson died in August, he left a pretty big dashiki to fill. Last night, John Myers - a protege of the barrel-chested, Afro-centric champion of the downtrodden - won the right to try it on for size. Myers, 47, backed by the Democratic Party, swamped three other candidates and will serve out the final year of Richardson's term in the 201st District, which covers parts of Germantown, Mount Airy and West Oak Lane. But independent candidate Veronica Joyner, a distant second last night, wants to take Myers to the cleaners before then.
NEWS
March 19, 1995 | By Virginia S. Wiegand, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Peter Wulfhorst moved up here nine years ago, there was only one traffic light in all of rural Pike County. Now, there are seven - along with new schools, a couple of fast-food restaurants and shopping centers, a Wal-Mart, a Kmart and a Rite Aid right in Milford, the county seat. A 225-bed prison and mini-mall are coming. And so many for-sale signs are plastered across empty lots, it looks as if the whole county's up for grabs. "The growth here has been unbelievable," said Wulfhorst, a Havertown native who, as the county planner coordinator, presides over this explosion.
REAL_ESTATE
September 18, 1994 | By Roxanne A. Jones, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
East Oak Lane has seen many changes since settlers named Jones came to this village from Wales in 1684. On soil that was once lush farmland and considered a summer resort for wealthy Philadelphians, a diverse city neighborhood now thrives and the wide, shaded streets are filled with faces of every hue. But time has not changed the one thing that has always attracted people to the area - its country charm. "Sometimes it's so quiet it's like the space that time's forgotten and you have to look over your shoulder because it's too good to be true," said Dolly Richardson, a resident.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ugliness of what happened at the Wawa in Concordville was captured on the store's video cameras. Over and over again, police have shown the two-minute tape to Edward Gourdier and Jacquelyn Pouncy, the clerks who were working in the store on Route 1 that night one week ago. The two, still bruised and hurting, are trying to reconstruct the incident for police and for themselves, trying to make sense of a senseless act that took place in...
NEWS
September 10, 1992
DEATH OF A COP: IN THE SHADOW OF A BADGE, HEARTBEAT IS STILLED In a quiet corner, photographs line the lobby walls of the Police Administration Building at 8th and Race Sts. - photographs of police officers killed in performance of their sworn duty; faces mourned by those who loved them and those who share in their chosen profession; faces time has quickly eliminated from the violent headlines that told of their deaths. Within the shadow of the badge beats a heartbeat. When we encounter emergencies, we depend on those who form the shadows and the heartbeats.
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