CollectionsQuiet Man
IN THE NEWS

Quiet Man

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 6, 2003
YOU PROBABLY don't know the name Fred Shabel. He is the quintessential quiet power-broker and benefactor every city needs. Recently, it was announced that Shabel, after four years, will be stepping down as chairman of the board for the Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation. If the economic engine that is tourism is finally roaring in Philadelphia, it's partly because of Shabel's leadership. After the 9/11 attacks, when the idea of leaving your home was about as appealing as a trek through the wilderness, Shabel lead the corporation in its successful "Philly's More Fun When You Sleep Over" campaign.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | By JACK McGUIRE and ANN GERHART, Daily News Staff Writers (Staff writer John F. Morrison contributed to this report.)
Robert McKnight, who lived the quiet and nearly anonymous life of a smalltime storekeeper in North Philadelphia for the past decade, was harboring a notorious past. A pal of the famous bank robber, Willie "The Actor" Sutton, McKnight, now 70, has a record of arrests for murder and armed robbery dating to the Depression, and he participated in Sutton's historic jailbreak nearly 40 years ago. McKnight ceased to be a quiet and anonymous storekeeper Wednesday night when, police say, he shot and killed one youth and wounded another outside his store on 33rd Street near Allegheny Avenue, in the Paradise section of North Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 28, 1990 | By John V. R. Bull, Inquirer Staff Writer
With its homespun setting and good home-cooked food, The Quiet Man reminds us of the rural lifestyle that is almost gone from rapidly developing Mount Laurel. Sited in an old country store, The Quiet Man - a combination delicatessen and restaurant - is cluttered with artifacts: A big old milk can sits by the door, and refrigerator cases that line an entire wall are topped by Pepsi, Coke and Hires soda bottles used a generation ago. Also on display are an old washboard, embroidered feed bags on hoops, a horseshoe over the front door and a non-working pot-bellied stove.
NEWS
October 7, 1991 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Coatesville defensive end Terrell Bryant has a simple plan of attack on most plays. "I try to knock my man inside and then I start looking for the ball," the 6-foot, 2-inch, 230-pound senior said after the Red Raiders' 41-7 win over West Chester Henderson on Saturday. In the game, Bryant did a lot of knocking and was an important part of a Red Raiders defense that limited the Warriors to just eight first downs. What he doesn't mention, and doesn't think much about, is the fact that for Bryant, pushing around opposing offensive lineman is pretty much a one-armed job. Bryant was born with a slightly deformed right hand that he cannot move very well and which is not very strong.
SPORTS
July 12, 2005 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It wasn't the most famous win in the Phillies' history, but it may have been the most important. Without it, the Phillies never would have faced the Kansas City Royals in the 1980 World Series. Without it, Tug McGraw's leap after his strikeout of Willie Wilson, and first baseman Pete Rose's miraculous catch - of a foul pop-up that bounced off the mitt of catcher Bob Boone - would never have become a part of Phillies lore. The date was Oct. 12, 1980. It was the final game of arguably the greatest postseason showdown in baseball history, the best-of-five National League Championship Series against the Houston Astros - and the fourth straight contest to reach extra innings.
NEWS
August 21, 1986 | By Hank Klibanoff, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer wire services contributed to this story.)
As horrible as yesterday's deadly gunfire was, some of the gunman's colleagues at the post office said they were "not surprised" by his actions. A loner who talked of Vietnam at length, though he apparently never served there. A quiet man who seemed to be brimming with pent-up anger. A sometimes peeping Tom whose neighbors called him "crazy Pat. " A man who always thought that the laughter of neighborhood children was directed at him. Those were among the descriptions of Patrick Henry Sherrill, 44, who died by his own hand after shooting 20 people, 14 of them fatally, at the post office where he was employed as a part-time mail carrier.
SPORTS
February 24, 1999 | By Chris Morkides, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Jameer Rasheed is Chester's quiet man. There is little flash to his game. There is little dash to his demeanor. If the Clippers' press is a hurricane, Rasheed is the eye. Chester's defense - and its offense, for that matter - was nonexistent early in the Clippers' District 1 Class AAAA second-round playoff game against Cheltenham last night. The Panthers were beating the Clippers inside. The rust from Chester's long layoff was showing. Enter Rasheed. Chester's quiet man led a defensive surge, scored 20 points, and helped the Clippers gain an 82-60 victory and a date against Academy Park, a 75-65 winner over Central Bucks East last night, in the district quarterfinals Friday.
SPORTS
August 1, 1993 | By Gwen Knapp, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After his fainting spell in an April 29 playoff game against the Charlotte Hornets, Boston Celtics captain Reggie Lewis played what would prove to be the final minutes of his professional basketball career. As he returned to the floor, Lewis heard the fans at Boston Garden cheering madly and chanting a name. It wasn't his. Larry Bird, a season into his retirement, was visiting the Garden for the first time since undergoing back surgery. When a television camera spotted him, he waved, and the fans returned the salutation with gusto - "La-reee, La-reee.
NEWS
December 24, 1992 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
John Odorisio, the man they called "Gabby," watched the Camden City Council meeting for perhaps his last time yesterday. He is leaving city government, and with him will go memories of past Council meetings and past mayors - long forgotten by others. Odorisio, 65, who got the nickname "Gabby" because he has always been a quiet man, is retiring not only because of his age, but also out of frustration. "I could have stayed on," said the white-haired gentleman who once called a play in high school football that made mayor-to-be Angelo Errichetti famous.
NEWS
February 11, 1998 | By Larry King, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A good 20 minutes into an interview about her "quiet, industrious" son, Mildred J. Sadler of Gastonia, N.C., stopped short. "He won't like all this publicity, I can tell you that," she said. "She's right," confirmed Kenneth Marvin Sadler, the newly named president of the Barnes Foundation. Unlike his proud mother, the deep-voiced North Carolina dentist couldn't seem to get off the phone fast enough. In Sadler, 48, the Barnes has a leader whom colleagues and relatives describe as retiring and soft-spoken, a man sincerely humbled by the spotlight.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
EDGAR HENDERSON, a general contractor whose company was involved in numerous renovation projects around the city, a devoted churchman and family patriarch, died Jan. 9. He was 87 and lived in Mount Airy. A native of Rankin County, Miss., Edgar came to Philadelphia, earned a GED and graduated from Temple University with a degree in architecture and design. He started E. Henderson Inc. in 1960, and built it into a thriving construction company that had 15 employees when he closed it in 2008.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
A moody, mysterious hitman. A woman fleeing her abusive husband. A police detective looking for love. Their paths converge in The Merry Gentleman , a sly and surprisingly sublime little noir romance, which marks the directing debut of Michael Keaton. Keaton stars as Frank Logan, the quiet man with the telescopic rifle who makes his living killing people. But Frank's experiencing a crisis: The murder business has turned him sad, suicidal. In fact, one snowy evening, he's ready to hurl himself from a building.
NEWS
March 27, 2009 | By Zoe Tillman and Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writers
Police detectives canvassed Old City businesses near the scene of an early morning homicide yesterday, seeking clues in the shooting death of a 29-year-old Southwest Philadelphia man. Keith Gray, 29, of the 6000 block of Chester Avenue, was shot and killed about 1 a.m. outside the upscale Prive Tapas Restaurant and Lounge on Market Street just east of Third. Gray and an unidentified man first argued inside the restaurant and were asked to leave by staff, police said. Once outside, the argument turned physical and the man pulled a gun, shooting Gray in the chest, stomach and twice in the right thigh.
SPORTS
November 2, 2005 | By Joe Juliano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Julius Erving used to have a locker close to Maurice Cheeks' during their playing days together on the 76ers, and he usually had to stretch his 6-foot-6 frame in real close to hear what the ultra-quiet Cheeks was saying. The thought made Erving chuckle last night when he returned to Philadelphia to witness the debut of Cheeks as the Sixers' head coach. "Who would have thought about that 25 years ago?" Erving said before the Sixers' game against the Milwaukee Bucks. "The quiet, shy Maurice, who let his actions speak louder than his words.
SPORTS
July 12, 2005 | By Sam Carchidi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It wasn't the most famous win in the Phillies' history, but it may have been the most important. Without it, the Phillies never would have faced the Kansas City Royals in the 1980 World Series. Without it, Tug McGraw's leap after his strikeout of Willie Wilson, and first baseman Pete Rose's miraculous catch - of a foul pop-up that bounced off the mitt of catcher Bob Boone - would never have become a part of Phillies lore. The date was Oct. 12, 1980. It was the final game of arguably the greatest postseason showdown in baseball history, the best-of-five National League Championship Series against the Houston Astros - and the fourth straight contest to reach extra innings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2005 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
In Stones in His Pocket, Irish blarney meets Hollywood baloney, and, under such circumstances, it should come as no surprise that truth and reality are early casualties. Marie Jones' serio-comedy about the invasion of a humble village in County Kerry by a company shooting a major Hollywood feature is a satirical exercise that might be more amusing if it had not already been done many times with more wit and imagination. When measured against the pure vitriol poured by Robert Altman's The Player and David Mamet's State and Main, Stones in His Pocket is more like the milky tea they serve in Bewley's in Dublin.
NEWS
October 6, 2003
YOU PROBABLY don't know the name Fred Shabel. He is the quintessential quiet power-broker and benefactor every city needs. Recently, it was announced that Shabel, after four years, will be stepping down as chairman of the board for the Greater Philadelphia Tourism Marketing Corporation. If the economic engine that is tourism is finally roaring in Philadelphia, it's partly because of Shabel's leadership. After the 9/11 attacks, when the idea of leaving your home was about as appealing as a trek through the wilderness, Shabel lead the corporation in its successful "Philly's More Fun When You Sleep Over" campaign.
SPORTS
December 5, 2001 | By Phil Sheridan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Brandon Whiting is one of the quieter Eagles. On a defense with the outsize personalities of Hugh Douglas, Hollis Thomas, Jeremiah Trotter and Troy Vincent, it's easy to be overlooked. When Whiting pulled a hamstring in practice three weeks ago, it was barely mentioned. There was no indication that Whiting, the Eagles' starting left end, would miss three games. Instead, he was quietly inactive each week. "It was never a case where we said we'd wait three weeks and let it heal," Whiting said Monday.
NEWS
August 15, 2001 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Floyd T. Greenwald, 67, comptroller for the South Jersey Port Corp., died of heart failure yesterday at his Cherry Hill home. Mr. Greenwald, who was hired as comptroller in 1980, was promoted to comptroller/assistant secretary treasurer in 1987 and to comptroller/assistant treasurer in 1995. "He was a very meticulous individual and always had a good-natured way about him," said Joseph Balzano, the port corporation's executive director. Born and raised in Lumberton, Mr. Greenwald was a graduate of Rancocas Valley Regional High School in Mount Holly, where he was on the cross-country team and ran distance races for the track team.
NEWS
October 18, 2000 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Borough Council President Henry Briggs went into video and television production because it was behind the camera. "I was never one for the limelight," Briggs said. And so, he would be the first to admit that he never envisioned himself presiding over the quintessential small-town meeting, where debate can get heated over speed bumps on King Street and the keeping of bantam roosters as pets. But Malvern, Briggs said, is worth his being on the hot seat from time to time.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|