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Quilts

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NEWS
June 18, 1992 | For The Inquirer / LINDA JOHNSON
More than 400 quilts, hand-sewn by church, school and community groups, schoolchildren and employees of Rhone-Poulenc Rorer, the pharmaceutical company with offices in Collegeville, were donated this month to the organization ABC (At-Risk Baby Crib) Quilts for use by children with AIDS in area hospitals.
NEWS
March 20, 1988 | By Shelly Phillips, Special to The Inquirer
Trample Not on the Oppressed. Drink and Die. These statements are so skillfully sewn into the century-old quilts that they're easy to miss. But Elaine Hedges makes a point of ferreting them out, as evidence that although women were shut out of political pursuits, they nevertheless promoted their causes with quilting needles. Hedges, professor of English and coordinator of Women's Studies at Towson State University, spoke last week at West Chester University as part of the Women's History Month celebration.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, Special to The Inquirer
What started off as a crazy challenge has turned into a national competition. Barbara Spittler, owner of Grandmother's Patches, a needlework store on Route 100 in Eagle, had an unusual quilting fabric from the Hoffman Co. in Mission Viejo, Calif. "It was really kind of ugly," Spittler recalled with a laugh. "It had a black background with a Mardi Gras-type design on it. I had it at my display at the National Quilting Association Show in Easton this past winter. Two nationally known quilters saw the fabric and one challenged the other to make a quilt out of it using only the fabric.
NEWS
January 3, 1997 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Quilts designed by Coatesville Area School District children are on display at the Chester County Historical Society, 225 N. High St., West Chester, through Jan. 11. The society is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. With 87 silk-screened patterns designed and painted by students ages 6 through 12, the quilts contain scenes from the children's lives, translated into simple designs and brilliant colors. The quilts were produced under the guidance of professional artists.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Houa Vue Mai is nothing if not adaptable. Using the skills her aunt and grandmother passed down to her so many years ago far off in the lush mountains of Laos, the young Hmong woman is supplementing the family income with her sewing. But unlike her ancestors, Houa Vue has no time to fashion intricately embroidered "story cloths" showing a succession of scenes filled with tiny stitched figures wearing traditional costumes. Every afternoon when she finishes work on the assembly line of a local chicken processing plant, Houa Vue goes home to make quilts.
NEWS
August 27, 1994 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Half the fun of going to a patchwork quilt sale - or even just to an exhibition - is trying to figure out the reason for each pattern's name. Take the 60 quilts that will be auctioned this afternoon at the 19th annual quilt auction at the Souderton Mennonite Homes, 207 W. Summit St., Souderton, Pa. Some names are self-evident, such as the quilt, number 18 in the auction catalogue, with a combination of squares and triangles making up an eight-...
NEWS
April 20, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Country sales next week will offer auctiongoers the chance to bid on carriages, quilts, a colossal collection of furniture - and, for do-it- yourselfers, a panoply of plumbing equipment. The plumbing equipment will be sold starting at 9:30 a.m. today in Voorhees, where Vilsmeier Auction Co. will sell off the equipment of the Joffe Plumbing Co., including vehicles, tools, water heaters, sinks, tubs, kitchen displays and office equipment. Among the vehicles to be sold are 10 vans - the newest a 1989 single-axle Hi-Cube - and seven pickup trucks, all but one of which are 1988 models.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
A search for new meaning in old quilts has spawned a handsome exhibition and some heated debate over religious symbols in quilt designs. It is commonly believed that the women who pieced and appliqued quilts in the 19th century recorded patterns in their lives. Their gardens, the stars, lightning, trees, birds and baskets were their inspiration. They named their patterns Melon Patch, Wild Goose Chase, Cross Roads and Setting Sun. Drunkard's Path was an admonition; Delectable Mountains was an image from John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress; Jacob's Ladder and Joseph's Coat came from Bible stories.
NEWS
May 25, 2003 | By Victoria Donohoe INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The old question was "can serious quiltmaking survive the probable atrophy of that medium in our computer age?" Answering with an emphatic yes is the display titled "Six Continents of Quilts," now on view at the James A. Michener Art Museum in Doylestown. The question arose when dedicated quilters sensitive to matters of technique seemed essentially uninvolved in the larger issues of American art. But by the dawn of the great quilting revival of the 1970s, all that changed.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
The fabric panels that Maine artists Gayle Fraas and Duncan Slade are exhibiting at Works Gallery are described as "quilts," but they're really quilted paintings. They're executed in dyes thickened with seaweed extract on cotton broadcloths that have been finished like quilts - backing, binding, etc. - and embellished with decorative stitching. That said, it's hard to think of the pieces as quilts, because they're easel-scale and framed like paintings or prints. Yet their fiber-art character ultimately prevails.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
The record of human existence comes in all forms, from crude drawings etched in stone to fully researched accounts compiled in bound volumes. Amy Finkel's speciality is words rendered by children in small, crisp stitches on fragments of linen. Officially, Finkel is an antiques dealer, third generation. She runs M. Finkel & Daughter, one of the last serious shops on the stretch of Pine Street once known as Antiques Row. Step into the spacious gallery and you will be greeted by a fine display of early American furniture, such as the 1830s settee carved by a Vermont woodworker or the well-worn captain's chair with the glint of red paint.
TRAVEL
September 29, 2014 | By Shelley Cameron-McCarron, For The Inquirer
MERCER COUNTY, Pa. - Upon entering an antebellum Greek Revival mansion through a soaring pillared porch, visitors find themselves in the front room of Tara, staring at Vivien Leigh's oh-so-petite jacket and the dressing gown that Clark Gable wore in Gone With the Wind . Artifacts from both the movie and the Civil War era are lovingly displayed in the restored 27-room luxury inn in Clark, on the banks of the Shenango River, its lush grounds filled...
NEWS
September 16, 2014 | By Kelly Flynn, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christine Webb has made more quilts than she can count. She said she often finds her husband, Julius Webb, laughing at her response to good news. "I always say I have to make a quilt, and he says, 'You don't have time to make everybody a quilt,' " she said. So Webb, who has been quilting for more than 40 years, had to find another way to share her art. She started slowly by printing her work on note cards and posters. Now, her work can be seen in the book 500 Traditional Quilts as well as the accompanying traveling international exhibition.
NEWS
July 17, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Growing up in West Philadelphia, Betty Leacraft was drawn to the look and feel of fabric and its many creative uses. "I've been sewing since I was a child," said Leacraft. "My maternal grandmother put the first needle and thread in my hand. " At Overbrook High School and Cheyney University, Leacraft developed a keen interest in African culture. Over the years, she combined those passions to create bold and colorful artwork as a fabric mixed-media artist. Later this month, Leacraft will visit South Africa, where one of her works will be part of an exhibit of art quilts in tribute to the late President Nelson Mandela.
NEWS
December 19, 2013
K EVIN O'BRIEN, 55, of Woodstock, N.Y., is founder and designer of Kevin O'Brien Studio in Point Breeze. O'Brien, who spends two days a week in Philadelphia, designs and manufactures hand-colored pillows, duvet covers, quilts and curtains. The studio also has licensing deals with manufacturers to distribute its rug and bedding lines. Q: How'd you get into textile design, manufacturing? A: I was teaching painting and drawing and was painting on fabrics and selling them as scarves.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
  Friends and Neighbors Artwork by Neighborhood Artists at 40th Street Artist-in-Residence, 4007 Chestnut St. Included in admission. 1/18. Modern Design Exhibit of work by 11 Pennsylvania-based furniture designers. Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center, 105 Seminary St., Pennsburg; 215-679-3103. 1/20. Stitched Through Time: A Legacy of Quilts - Part II More than 30 works drawn from the museum's quilt collection. Gloucester County Historical Society Museum, 58 N. Broad St., Woodbury; 856-848-8531.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Though unmistakable in retrospect, Mom's symptoms were not obvious at first. Her six grown children told her, and themselves, that plenty of older people are forgetful. Everybody misplaces keys and glasses and checkbooks, they said. Anybody can forget how to spell forty . Boy, were we ever in denial. Our mother had - and still has - dementia, the umbrella term for Alzheimer's disease and similar disorders with little in the way of treatment, and no cure. An estimated 5.4 million Americans have dementia, which saps people of the ability to handle the car, the checkbook, the cooking.
TRAVEL
October 28, 2012 | Associated Press
LANCASTER - The harvest season is nearing its glorious end, and the culture, architecture, and history of Pennsylvania's Amish country can be seen for free in Lancaster County, where many Amish settled starting in the early 1700s. The region's central city, Lancaster - which features a wonderful central market, galleries, and antique stores - is about 70 miles west of Philadelphia. In the surrounding countryside are quaint and quirky towns such as Bird-in-Hand, Ephrata, Intercourse, and Strasburg.
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