CollectionsQuintet
IN THE NEWS

Quintet

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1988 | By Tom Moon, Inquirer Popular-Music Critic
The "old" tango: Orchestras in central-casting gaucho suits. A rose clenched passionately between teeth. Songs about the hard life of the common man, supported by instruments gushing unchecked sentiment. The "new" tango: No words at all. Music that borrows the tint of tango melancholy, but not necessarily its overt play to the heart. Music too intricate for dancing, performed instead in concert halls. The man responsible is Astor Piazzolla, the Charlie Parker of Argentina.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1998 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since the vibraphone shares characteristics with both percussion instruments and the piano, it makes sense that Stefon Harris, the young lion of the vibes, would have good communications with his pianist and drummer. During his second set Sunday night at Zanzibar Blue, Harris, working with his quintet, demonstrated this quality during his composition "A Cloud of Red Dust. " At several points in an extended improvisation, Harris. whose mallet technique combines classical's precision, the speed of jazz, and a steel drummer's playful radical ear, repeatedly played short eighth-note figures, varying them while his rhythm section reacted.
NEWS
February 15, 1988 | By Andrew Stiller, Special to The Inquirer
It was as much an occasion as a concert at the Academy of Music Ballroom yesterday afternoon: After the premiere of his Quintet for Flute and Strings, Burle Marx, a Brazilian expatriate composer and longtime Philadelphia resident, was presented with the Philadelphia Medal "for his outstanding contribution to the world of music. " Standing in for the mayor's office in conferring the highest medal the city gives for such achievements was Eugene Rausa, president of the recently organized Burle Marx Music Society.
SPORTS
December 15, 2006 | By Pete Schnatz INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In most leagues, contenders rise and fall as rosters turn over and coaches move on to other pursuits. But in the Colonial Conference - as true as sneakers will squeak on freshly varnished courts, and basketballs will make a distinct thwip sound while dropping through newly hung nets - the path to the title will most assuredly wend through the conference's "Big 5" again this season. Haddon Heights, Haddonfield, Sterling, Collingswood and Haddon Township combined to go 82-25 in the conference last season, and the teams averaged nearly 21 wins and fewer than eight losses overall.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2005 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To Leonard Podolak, the string-band music he plays with the Duhks is not all that different from punk-rock. "I met some folks in the Annapolis area who were coming from punk-rock but they love old-time music, because it has a lot of the same rhythms [and the songs have] a lot of the heartbreak and the real living - what it's all really about," the 29-year-old banjo player and singer - and the oldest Duhk - said from his home in Winnipeg, Manitoba. That connection between old and new can be heard in striking fashion on The Duhks (pronounced Ducks)
LIVING
April 24, 1996 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER
It's a big moment for the experimental rock quintet Bardo Pond. Vocalist and flutist Isobel Sollenberger is going to reveal the lyrics to "Limerick. " Though they perform the song on their Matador Records debut, Amanita, the guys in Bardo Pond have to confess: They don't have a clue what the song's about. The lyrics are totally Sollenberger's work. And her expressive voice, which she weaves delicately throughout the band's trance-inducing compositions, is often obscured by a wall of guitars.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | By Sam Wood, Special to The Inquirer
An American eccentric, Grisman purveys what he calls "dawg music," a mongrel melange of bluegrass and lite-jazz that is tasteful - but ultimately flavorless. "Dawg music" allows Grisman to escape the artistic fetters that a label like bluegrass can bring. But Saturday night many of his excursions into forms other than bluegrass - bossa nova, samba and tango - seemed pallid and wan. The dilution of his Appalachian firewater yielded the musical equivalent of a wine spritzer best served with a Marin County brunch.
NEWS
December 30, 2002 | By Fred Beckley FOR THE INQUIRER
Being almost-Philadelphians, they naturally both moved far away. Ben Vaughn found fortune composing for TV in Los Angeles; his former soundman, Dan Montgomery, hopes to find his way back home from Memphis. Both New Jersey natives held an informal eye-of-the-holiday-storm homecoming Friday night at the North Star Bar. Montgomery played first to about 50 people. It seemed that most folks knew most other folks, and everyone knew him. Some were related. Montgomery strummed, sang, and blew his harmonica through 14 pointed tales of dysfunctional relationships, substance abuse and - new in 2002 - mid-life crises ("Black Top")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1994 | By Peter Dobrin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Locust Street was hardly swarming with people the way it usually is before a concert at the Academy of Music; few people braved a wintry mix of precipitation Tuesday night to see the Canadian Brass. But the 800 or so people who turned out seemed glad they did. One woman in the audience was heard saying after the concert that the members of the quintet are more entertainers than musicians. True, they're well-known through a plethora of television appearances - The Tonight Show, Today, Entertainment Tonight and Sesame Street among them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saturday night at Chris' Jazz Café, guitarist Pat Martino leaned into his set-opening solo on Wes Montgomery's "Full House" as if he and his quintet had been playing at full rage for two hours already. Epochal is too small a word. Minute after minute, Martino, 71, explored a universe of expressive treasures, playing loud, taking it down, bringing it back up, with melody, wit, delicacy, precision, and wisdom. Not only is it physically forbidding to play as he does, it also takes a deep soul, years of living, of playing, imagining, understanding.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Peter Dobrin, CLASSICAL MUSIC CRITIC
In terms of an ensemble profoundly shaking up a repertoire, the string quartet has the Kronos Quartet, and contemporary chamber music has had Speculum Musicae. The woodwind quintet right now is lucky to have Imani Winds, which played Sunday afternoon for what the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society said was the society's final concert in the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Van Pelt Auditorium before the 400-seat hall is demolished for the next phase of museum renovations. (A museum spokesperson could not confirm plans for demolition.)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Saturday night at Chris' Jazz Café, guitarist Pat Martino leaned into his set-opening solo on Wes Montgomery's "Full House" as if he and his quintet had been playing at full rage for two hours already. Epochal is too small a word. Minute after minute, Martino, 71, explored a universe of expressive treasures, playing loud, taking it down, bringing it back up, with melody, wit, delicacy, precision, and wisdom. Not only is it physically forbidding to play as he does, it also takes a deep soul, years of living, of playing, imagining, understanding.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
  T   OM HANKS , Sting , Lily Tomlin , Al Green and ballerina Patricia McBride were feted at this year's Kennedy Center Honors on Sunday night, in Washington, D.C. For the first time, the show was hosted by Stephen Colbert , although it did perfectly fine without a host in the years since Walter Cronkite was emcee. But Colbert is coming to CBS, and CBS airs the show (Dec. 30), so it was either him or the cast of "NCIS. " David Letterman , Steven Spielberg and filmmaker George Stevens Jr. saluted Hanks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Music Critic
The prevailing music-industry take on how much a listener needs to know about a piece before hearing it is the more the better. I am more dubious than ever after Sunday afternoon at the American Philosophical Society, when New York Woodwind Quintet clarinetist Charles Neidich told the audience that the composer of the next piece belonged to that unfortunate grouping that had perished in concentration camps during World War II. As the pendulum swings,...
NEWS
February 16, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Music Critic
Storm? What storm? The Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater was populated as if nothing unusual was happening outside Thursday, and even picked up extra listeners from the canceled Philadelphia Orchestra, whose members took the opportunity to hear the Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet. "You must be brave," said the quintet's hornist Fergus McWilliam to the audience. "But then, we got here, too. " Though a specialized instrumentation with a slim repertoire, the wind quintet's program was anchored with two formidable works that would be known more widely if always heard in the caliber of performance delivered by the Berliners Thursday in a Philadelphia Chamber Music Society concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
To most of the world, Ben Vaughn is known for his work in television (composing and scoring 3rd Rock From the Sun and That '70s Show , among other programs), his role as a producer of goofballs (Ween, for one), and his syndicated radio show, The Many Moods of Ben Vaughn . To radio jock Jerry Blavat, Vaughn is the "hottest thing since popcorn. " To his (former) fellow Philadelphians, however, Vaughn is a twang-bar king whose inspirations range from rockabilly icons (Duane Eddy)
SPORTS
March 14, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
JUST AS FANS started to get good and worked up about the Eagles' inactivity in the early hours of free agency, the team dropped a load of signings on the reeling Twitterverse. Five new Eagles joined the roster, though they weren't the splashy, top-of-the-market guys some fans always seem to want, in the face of solid evidence that trying to build a winner that way doesn't work. The signings reflected what general manager Howie Roseman and new coach Chip Kelly said in the weeks leading up to the opening of the market: The Eagles need players, as they transition from the Andy Reid era to new systems.
NEWS
November 8, 2011 | By Phil Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's a dream come true, times five. "When we were freshmen, I never could have imagined this would happen to all of us," said Rob Alessandrine, the slick shortstop who is one of five Gloucester Catholic baseball players who will sign NCAA Division I scholarships on Wednesday. Alessandrine, outfielder Pat Kane, and infielders Joe Brooks, John Brue, and Brett Tenuto have been key players for Gloucester Catholic teams that have won the last two Non-Public B state championships and pushed the program back into national prominence.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2011 | By Steve Klinge, For The Inquirer
When Clap Your Hands Say Yeah went to work on its third album 21/2 years ago, members reached an impasse. Their self-released, self-titled, and self-distributed debut had been an indie sensation in 2005. For their second album, 2007's more difficult Some Loud Thunder, they worked with acclaimed producer Dave Fridmann. But then they needed to regroup. "We were just not firing on all cylinders at that particular time," says Alec Ounsworth, on the phone between tour stops in Germany.
NEWS
April 7, 2011
With his swinging, acoustic gypsy jazz tunes in the Django Reinhardt tradition, Jorgenson coulda/shoulda been on the French-focused PIFA schedule (see above). But he's caught our eye as one of the first attractions of merit at the spanking new World Cafe Live in Wilmington, only a half-hour drive down I-95. JJ's foursome performs in the smaller, plainer Upstairs room carved out of lobby space in this 50-years-abandoned, $25 million renovated movie theater. But while you're there, sneak a peek at the fascinating "archeological dig" design elements in stairwells and the main, two-level theater with state-of-the-art (though in some balcony spots too reverberant)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|