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Quiz Show

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 1994 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The most potent sequence in Robert Redford's riveting and perceptive new film, Quiz Show, features a sunny birthday picnic at a Connecticut retreat, circa 1958. As entertainment, the 60ish birthday boy recites passages from Shakespeare, expecting his sons to correctly identify each citation. This dazzling display of intellectual firepower and generational fireworks is followed by presents. Amid the modest ties and tomes is a chunky, foil- wrapped parcel that is revealed to be . . . a television console.
NEWS
October 8, 1994 | by Tom Robbins, New York Daily News
Hollywood just doesn't make movies about guys like Joe Stone. An unheralded civil servant, Stone spent most of his career behind a desk listening to other people's problems. And quietly, doggedly, doing something about them. A clerk at age 16, Stone went to law school at night and later became a prosecutor in the Manhattan district attorney's office, then chief of its complaints bureau. That's where he was Aug. 27, 1958, when a former TV quiz show contestant named Herbert Stempel walked in and told him the games were rigged.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1994 | By Leonard W. Boasberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Before and after Twenty-One, the fixed quiz show that the film Quiz Show has made infamous again, there was What in the World. William H. "Bill" Davenport remembers it well. He appeared as a contestant several times back in the 1960s. What in the World was an archaeological TV quiz show that challenged experts to display their knowledge (or admit their lack of it). The show, with brilliant if often curmudgeonly scholars one-upping each other, had exotica, excitement, entertainment, suspense and laughs.
NEWS
May 15, 2002 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Who Wants to Be a Millionaire is gone. ABC and the WB announced their fall schedules yesterday. And there wasn't a quiz show in sight, as the alphabet net unveiled seven series and the little frog came in with six. Possible standouts at ABC include a series adaptation of the Dinotopia mini-series; a strange-sounding mystery-drama produced by Ben Affleck that offers prizes to clever viewers; and the 345th return to TV of sunny, funny Bonnie...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2001 | By Andrea Gerlin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The ingredients for success are simple enough: ridicule, humiliation, money - and a dominatrix in designer black. Those are the elements of Britain's hottest television show, The Weakest Link, whose mortifying attractions may soon be available to U.S. viewers. NBC, confident that public abasement will be at least as popular on the western side of the Atlantic, shot a pilot here Jan. 11 for a U.S. version, perhaps hosted by Survivor winner Richard Hatch. The British quiz show - in which a dragon-lady host ridicules contestants and encourages them to vilify each other - is a sort of cruel cross between Survivor and Who Wants to Be a Millionaire.
NEWS
October 23, 1997 | By Marguerite P. Jones, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A multigenerational quiz show on consumer issues will be held at Bucks County Community College at 12:30 p.m. Tuesday. Students at BCCC will compete against senior citizens from the Bucks County William Penn Chapter of the American Association of Retired Persons. The competition will challenge consumer knowledge of health, safety, personal finance, environment, and consumer rights and responsibilities. The questions will address real-life issues and test consumer skills necessary for making everyday-life decisions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1995 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A satirical drama set in medieval France and a thought-provoking look at the TV quiz-show scandals of the 1950s top this busy week in home-video releases. THE ADVOCATE (1993) (Miramax) 102 minutes. Colin Firth, Lysette Anthony, Ian Holm, Donald Pleasence. A blistering satire that uses an obscure aspect of medieval law - that animals could be tried like humans for crimes - to brilliant effect. With an A-list British cast, director Leslie Megahey explores the gap between the legal and the moral in the bizarre trials of a burned-out Parisian lawyer who sets up a country practice in Abbeville in the late 1400s.
NEWS
October 1, 1994 | By Richard Cohen
The dead cannot be libeled. So says the law. But the dead can have their reputations sullied, if not ruined, and they can be exploited for entertainment purposes. Such seems to be the fate of Robert Kintner, the late president of the National Broadcasting Company, who now and forevermore will be known as the man who fixed the famous 1950s television quiz show, Twenty- One. Who says he did anything of the sort? Robert Redford does - and says he has the proof. But no one else does - and even those who suspect that Kintner must have known that the contestants on his cash-cow of a television show were being fed the answers in advance, have no proof.
NEWS
May 15, 2001 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
The Weakest Link is strong enough for NBC, a quiz show so cheap and popular that the network will double its airplay next fall. Moving first among the TV networks, NBC announced its fall lineup yesterday. By Thursday, all six will have unveiled their schedules. In addition to adding a Link to its programming chain, NBC will premiere three new sitcoms - one starring superchef Emeril Lagasse - and three dramas, including yet another Law & Order offshoot and a medical/mystery/woman-against-the world saga starring Law & Order alumna Jill Hennessey.
NEWS
September 28, 1994 | by Veronique de Turenne, Los Angeles Daily News
Nancy Linde could have wished for a better time to debut a game show. Six months more or less, and her new show, "Think Twice," hosted by comedian Monteria Ivey, would have missed the national spotlight trained on the game- show genre. But with the new film "Quiz Show" kicking up the dust of the game-show scandals of the 1950s, Linde's brainchild, airing Oct. 10 on PBS, (locally on Channel 12) seems ripe for scrutiny. "It's an interesting time to get started," Linde said. Her career in the past has centered on writing, developing and producing the weekly science show "Nova.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, INQUIRER TV WRITER
What were our Founders thinking when they gathered in Philadelphia in 1787 for the Constitutional Convention? According to Peter Sagal, who hosts PBS's consistently lively four-part series, Constitution USA (premiering at 9 p.m. Tuesday on WHYY TV12), the distinguished delegates had both short- and long-term goals. "The Founders came to Philadelphia to fix the Articles of Confederation," Sagal says in the first segment, "A More Perfect Union. " "Also, to make sure that 200 years later, this city would enjoy a booming constitutionally themed tourist trade.
NEWS
September 28, 2012 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Content advisory: The following story contains sexual and drug-related innuendo that some readers may find offensive.   Top three answers are on the board. Name a new title for Family Feud with a word that rhymes with feud : Family Lewd. (Good answer!) Family Crude. (Good answer!) Family Rude. (Good answer!) Certainly not Prude , or Subdued . The new season of the syndicated quiz show is off to hot start, and not just because of its highest Nielsen ratings in two decades.
NEWS
November 18, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
It wasn't just aptitude that helped Roger Craig of Newark, Del., become Jeopardy! 's latest Tournament of Champions winner. It was also an app. The 34-year-old computer scientist, who earned a Ph.D just last year at the University of Delaware, did "text mining" of about 211,000 archived posers to "reverse-engineer" the quiz show and solve "a nonlinear optimization problem: How do I study?" Or so he explained in a video now getting lots of looks online. (Go to: http://bit.ly/tG5pz4 .)
NEWS
February 14, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
The future bragging rights of the human brain depend, in part, on a Lancaster college dropout-turned-actor and comedian. This week, millions will be watching Jeopardy! to see whether an IBM computer system named Watson can defeat the quiz show's two best players ever. Since the showdown involves interpreting difficult language, experts say it is far more significant than the much-ballyhooed triumph of IBM's Deep Blue over world chess champ Garry Kasparov in 1997. "It is a big deal," said David Blei, a machine-learning specialist at Princeton University.
NEWS
June 10, 2010 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
After four years, WXPN has scaled back Y-Rock on XPN , canning the alternative-music show heard Wednesday through Friday nights on 88.5 FM. Y-Rock will continue at www.yrockonxpn.org and at XPN's HD-2 side channel. Operations manager Josh T. Landow was one of six people laid off this week from the University of Pennsylvania-owned station. Station manager Roger LaMay blamed the economy. "We delayed it as long as we could, but we have an obligation to balance our budget," he said.
NEWS
August 1, 2008 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ed Harvey, 92, of Wayne, the dean of Philadelphia talk-show hosts, died of cancer Wednesday at the Malvern home of his daughter Susan Rhoades. Mr. Harvey joined the staff of WCAU-TV and radio in 1951. He hosted the Here's Harvey morning show for WCAU-AM six days a week and also hosted the Fun and Fortune quiz show on WCAU-TV twice a week. He called the quiz show the worst TV program ever, his daughter said, and considered it his "fortune" when Ed McMahon, Johnny Carson's future Tonight Show sidekick, returned from military duty in Korea to relieve him. In 1960, Mr. Harvey was the first area radio personality to implement technology that permitted dialogue between callers and the on-air host.
NEWS
February 10, 2008 | By Jan L. Apple FOR THE INQUIRER
"Penguins live primarily on what continent?" "Oars are usually used to row a boat. What is usually used to move a canoe?" Such were the questions posed at Our Lady of Good Counsel School in Moorestown to sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade contestants to find out "Are You Smarter than a Fifth Grader?" An audience of first- through eighth-grade students cheered when contestants correctly answered "Antarctica" and "Paddles. " The assembly, modeled after the popular television show, was one in a series of events at Good Counsel during the last week in January to celebrate Catholic Schools Week.
NEWS
September 17, 2007
RE SUZANNE Muldowney's letter, "Too much Elvis!": Groucho Marx's claim to being famous was slapstick comedy and a quiz show with a rubber duck with a cigar in its mouth. On Zero Mostel, I have serious doubts how many Americans could name two movies he ever appeared in. Maria Callas and Leopold Stokowski speak for themselves. Bing Crosby: Nice man, great golf tournament, "White Christmas" (great holiday song), end of story. Elvis Presley, American icon, served his country, was a person whose generosity was only outdone by his millions of records, many of which were gold.
NEWS
December 30, 2004 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jeopardy! champ Ken Jennings' buzzer finger probably hasn't even straightened out yet, and already he's being called back to defend his trivia crown. After winning more than $2 million in a freaky 74-game streak that garnered huge ratings for the quiz show, Jennings will have a chance to nearly double his take. Producers announced Tuesday there will be a "Super Tournament," which will pit Jennings in a final match against two survivors of a competition among nearly 150 five-time winners.
NEWS
May 15, 2002 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Who Wants to Be a Millionaire is gone. ABC and the WB announced their fall schedules yesterday. And there wasn't a quiz show in sight, as the alphabet net unveiled seven series and the little frog came in with six. Possible standouts at ABC include a series adaptation of the Dinotopia mini-series; a strange-sounding mystery-drama produced by Ben Affleck that offers prizes to clever viewers; and the 345th return to TV of sunny, funny Bonnie...
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