CollectionsQuorum
IN THE NEWS

Quorum

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | By Edward Power, Inquirer Staff Writer
A judge hearing a lawsuit that grew out of a feud within a health care workers' union cut through weeks of hearings and legal motions yesterday and concluded that the case boiled down to one question. That question, U.S. District Judge Herbert J. Hutton told the attorneys before him, focuses on the exact number of officials needed to form a quorum from the executive board of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees. Hutton asked the attorneys for their definition of a quorum - which both sides had agreed was 51 percent - and attempted to pin down the number of board members that would constitute such a quorum.
NEWS
December 21, 2004 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in more than a month, the Camden Board of Education had enough members present last night to conduct business. Because of chronic absences, the board had been unable to approve routine matters, such as paying its bills. Five members are needed for a quorum, and all six attended last night. Three of the board's nine seats are vacant, pending appointments by acting Gov. Richard J. Codey. Meeting at 7 p.m., the board approved a report from Superintendent Annette D. Knox that had been pending for several weeks because the previous two regular meetings had failed to achieve a quorum.
NEWS
July 17, 1988 | By Mary H. Donohue, Special to The Inquirer
Lack of a quorum prevented Upper Uwchlan's Planning Commission from taking any action on township business, but it prompted commission Chairman Shelly Krockerto speak about commissioners who don't show up. When the required five of the nine planning board members failed to attend Thursday night's meeting, Krocker apologized to the residents in the audience. The chairman told the group that this was the first time in two years that the commission lacked a quorum. "I don't like this happening to the public, and I'm very upset about this," he said.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the third consecutive month, the Jenkintown Planning Commission could not take any action last week for lack of a quorum. Only three of the commission's seven members - Howard O'Neill, Edith Richards and chairman Gary Hutnick - attended Wednesday's monthly meeting. Member John McNally had said he would be on vacation. Barbara Bertha and Willard Fichthorn did not attend. The seventh member of the commission, William West, who has been absent for a year, has formally resigned.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Facing a tight window to get a constitutional amendment modifying the right to bail on the ballot in November, the Assembly on Friday took a little-noticed procedural step to move the proposal forward. The 80-member chamber, controlled by Democrats, needed to establish a quorum - a minimum number of members present to take action - to ensure that the amendment spent the requisite number of days in each house before a full vote could be held. However, only one member, Reed Gusciora (D., Mercer)
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
AS COUNCIL Majority Leader Curtis Jones Jr. began yesterday's budget hearing on the City Controller's Office, he was joined in Council chambers by only four of his 15 colleagues. Some would wander in later, and some would leave. But at no point during Controller Alan Butkovitz's testimony was a majority of Council members present. Unless, that is, you ask City Council. Council now has 16 members, due to a vacancy, but a quorum still requires nine to be present. That's a rare sight during the budget hearings, but the meetings can go on even with only a few members present so long as no one calls for a quorum check or vote.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By Ellen Pulver, Special to The Inquirer
The factions on Glenolden Borough Council have surfaced once again, but this time without the usual shouting or arguing. When only three of the seven Glenolden Borough councilmen showed up for the council's regular monthly meeting Thursday, the three were forced to reschedule the meeting until Jan. 26 at 8 p.m. Councilman William J. Reese Sr. said that during his "many years" of attending council meetings and being in contact with borough politics,...
NEWS
December 21, 1986 | By Joe Ferry, Special to The Inquirer
The Warminster Township Planning Commission has reviewed plans by the F. C. Haab Oil Co. for the addition of a 9,000-square-foot building on its property at 899 Mearns Rd. At Wednesday night's commission meeting, Haab vice president Richard Keyser outlined the company's plans for a 50-foot-by-180-foot prefabricated warehouse, to be used for storing drums of lubricants. Because the planning commission lacked a quorum, no vote was taken on either of the two plans reviewed Wednesday.
NEWS
January 11, 2005 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the first meeting of the new year, but an old problem came back to haunt the Camden Board of Education last night: Not enough members showed up to do business. Five members must be present for a quorum, but only four showed up. "Ladies and gentlemen, we will not be able to discuss any business," Board President Philip Freeman intoned to the three other members. "We do not have a quorum. . . . You have my deepest and humblest apology. " The board waited for member Keith Carver, who had said he could attend.
NEWS
September 14, 2001 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
City Council last night made significant appointments to major agencies in the city, including a key appointment to the Redevelopment Agency, which has been stymied by a lack of a quorum. Council also approved an appointment to the Camden Parking Authority, which recently has come under increased state scrutiny. In the first appointment last night, Vance Bowman was sworn in for a four-year term on the Redevelopment Agency, which recently lost four members who failed to meet state requirements.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 2, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Members of the New Jersey Assembly will soon be able to register their attendance via cellphone or e-mail to allow certain legislative business to proceed. The Assembly introduced and passed a resolution Monday that changes the chamber's rules, which previously indicated that at least 41 legislators, a majority of the 80-member body, must be present at the Statehouse in order to constitute a quorum. Now, in certain cases, legislators can record their attendance with the Office of the Clerk by using "communication equipment providing identification of the member," the resolution says.
NEWS
July 16, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Facing a tight window to get a constitutional amendment modifying the right to bail on the ballot in November, the Assembly on Friday took a little-noticed procedural step to move the proposal forward. The 80-member chamber, controlled by Democrats, needed to establish a quorum - a minimum number of members present to take action - to ensure that the amendment spent the requisite number of days in each house before a full vote could be held. However, only one member, Reed Gusciora (D., Mercer)
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
AS COUNCIL Majority Leader Curtis Jones Jr. began yesterday's budget hearing on the City Controller's Office, he was joined in Council chambers by only four of his 15 colleagues. Some would wander in later, and some would leave. But at no point during Controller Alan Butkovitz's testimony was a majority of Council members present. Unless, that is, you ask City Council. Council now has 16 members, due to a vacancy, but a quorum still requires nine to be present. That's a rare sight during the budget hearings, but the meetings can go on even with only a few members present so long as no one calls for a quorum check or vote.
NEWS
April 9, 2012
HARRISBURG'S become a competitive reality show - a bad one. It's a near-comedic contest between state and city government over which is more inept. It's not so much a clash of titans; more like midget wrestling. From the 'Burg going bust to the listless Legislature to the guv tied to conspiracy theories, it's life in a different dimension. Take the broke city. Its "leaders" can't agree how to fix it. Its mayor made national news last year by publicly turning to God for help (she prayed and fasted for three days)
NEWS
May 27, 2011 | By Scott Bauer and Todd Richmond, Associated Press
MADISON, Wis. - The fight over stripping collective-bargaining rights from Wisconsin's public workers will move into the state Supreme Court, and possibly back into the Legislature, after a judge Thursday struck down the law that passed despite large protests that paralyzed the Capitol. Republican backers of Gov. Scott Walker's proposal said they were confident the state Supreme Court would overturn the judge's ruling that lawmakers broke open-meetings statutes during the law's approval process.
NEWS
September 18, 2009 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reacting to reports that the Zoning Board of Adjustment's inability to conduct business is killing projects and slowing development, Councilman Darrell L. Clarke introduced legislation yesterday to change the board's make-up. At City Council's first meeting of the season, Clarke proposed a change to the Home Rule Charter, to reduce the board to five members from six. The measure, which would require voter approval, would also reduce the required quorum from four members to three.
NEWS
May 11, 2008
Mayor Nutter and City Council are trying to decide how to slice up next year's nearly $4 billion budget. But taxpayers haven't been privy to all of the discussions because some meetings took place in secret. Such closed-door meetings may be fine for a private company. But not for government when the public's business is at stake. The secret sessions clearly violate the spirit, if not the letter, of the state's Sunshine Act. The law says the public has a right to be present at all meetings where agency business is discussed or acted upon.
NEWS
January 11, 2005 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It was the first meeting of the new year, but an old problem came back to haunt the Camden Board of Education last night: Not enough members showed up to do business. Five members must be present for a quorum, but only four showed up. "Ladies and gentlemen, we will not be able to discuss any business," Board President Philip Freeman intoned to the three other members. "We do not have a quorum. . . . You have my deepest and humblest apology. " The board waited for member Keith Carver, who had said he could attend.
NEWS
December 21, 2004 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the first time in more than a month, the Camden Board of Education had enough members present last night to conduct business. Because of chronic absences, the board had been unable to approve routine matters, such as paying its bills. Five members are needed for a quorum, and all six attended last night. Three of the board's nine seats are vacant, pending appointments by acting Gov. Richard J. Codey. Meeting at 7 p.m., the board approved a report from Superintendent Annette D. Knox that had been pending for several weeks because the previous two regular meetings had failed to achieve a quorum.
NEWS
December 17, 2004 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two Camden school board members who have been chronically absent from meetings attended a caucus last night, helping to ease a district crisis over the failure to conduct business because of a lack of a quorum. The two members, Luis Lopez and Kathryn Blackshear, have informed Mayor Gwendolyn Faison that they do not intend to step down from the unpaid, part-time positions. Faison appointed the pair. A third member, Vice President Ivonne E. Martinez, an appointee of former Gov. Jim McGreevey, stepped down from the board this week, citing poor health and the advice of her doctor.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|