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Rabbit Hole

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
I WAS TORN in "Rabbit Hole" between sympathy for a couple who's lost a child, and envy of their fantastic house. Grief is everywhere in the movie, but so are Viking ranges and leaded glass windows, ornate moldings and other fittings appropriate to a fantastic period renovation/updating of their century-old home. As you've probably heard, though, this is not a movie about real estate (although the carved-wood front door does open to fantastic views of the Hudson). Gawking gives way to a consideration of grief.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
There are moments early in the domestic vignette Rabbit Hole , starring Nicole Kidman and Aaron Eckhart as a couple estranged by that which shall not be spoken, when they seem like cousins of George and Martha in Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Wrenching, poignant, and quietly healing, John Cameron Mitchell's adaptation of David Lindsay-Abaire's Pulitzer Prize-winning play soon reveals what has come between the tightly wound Becca (Kidman) and the unraveling Howie (Eckhart)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2009 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Sometimes it's obvious why a play wins the Pulitzer Prize. Rabbit Hole, by David Lindsay-Abaire, currently at the Arden Theatre and directed by James J. Christy, is a cathartic crowd-pleaser: Waves of compassion flow toward the stage, nods of understanding in the dark. I was waving and nodding too, in Act One. But by Act Two the predictability of the events, of the emotions, of the responses, of the reconciliations, was so obvious that I felt I'd seen the play before, which I hadn't.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2006 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the canon of nightmares, the death of a child is among the most terrible. And an accidental death - one that would not have happened if just, if only, if maybe - is a death the devil lives in. The tragedy could bring parents closer or rip them apart. It's driving a stake through Becca and Howie. Their marriage is becoming a torment of grief and blame and pain and, most irreversibly, isolation. Their 4-year-old, Danny, never appears in Rabbit Hole, which opened Thursday on Broadway.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010
Alice in Wonderland . (Walt Disney Pictures, '10) $29.99. 108 mins. Alice, now 19, slips into a rabbit hole that takes her to "Underland," where she must terminate the Red Queen's reign to save her childhood friends. With Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska. PG (fantasy action/violence involving scary images and situations) (CC) The Wolfman 1/2 (Universal, '10) $29.98. 103 mins. An actor who goes home to investigate the savage death of his brother is bitten by a creature. R (bloody horror violence and gore)
NEWS
November 9, 1986
How many missiles can be launched from the head of a pin? Having followed the negotiations at Reykjavik, the ensuing claims and counter claims and the expert analyses rather closely, we came to one conclusion: confusion compounded. Was it a failure - or a success? Was the President booby-trapped? Who put what proposals on the table? Is "Star Wars" feasible - or a hoax? Why were our military chiefs unhappy? Were our allies consulted? Would Star Wars cost one trillion dollars or two?
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | By Howard Lewis 3d
Sometimes, those who purport to investigate the state of the U.S. economy remind me of the children's fable, Alice in Wonderland, about the girl who fell through a rabbit hole only to find that up was down, down was up, and nothing in her world made sense anymore. Alice found a Wonderland. Not so Barlett and Steele. They emerged from their rabbit hole to announce they'd found the American Dream dead and buried - and that government, business, and, especially, foreigners were to blame.
NEWS
September 26, 1996 | BY PAUL DAVIS
As President Clinton has assumed most of the traditional Republican stances in this election year, one could say that there are few differences between him and the Republican challenger, Bob Dole. But I believe there is one notable difference that separates the two candidates, and that is that Dole is clearly more qualified to be the commander in chief of the armed forces. Despite the end of the Cold War, we still face formidable adversaries around the world and chemical and nuclear proliferation is on the rise.
NEWS
May 5, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
BIRD'S NEST MORE POWERFUL THAN A SPEEDING BULLET TRAIN It wasn't faster than a speeding bullet - but a bird still managed to stop those powerful symbols of Japan's technological prowess, the bullet trains. Seems a bird's nest built atop overhead power lines caused a short-circuit and forced engineers to stop service on two train lines for more than two hours yesterday. Seven trains were canceled, affecting about 25,000 passengers. Delays of 10 minutes to more than two hours - on trains noted for their punctuality - continued more than 10 hours after service was restored.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 22, 2013
GOOD NEWS, KIDS, it's Rabbit Breeders Week in Pennsylvania. Yep. The state House took a bold stand last week and voted 196-0 in favor of honoring rabbit breeders. This bravely bucks conventional wisdom. Who thinks rabbits need help breeding? So maybe there's hope that the House gets hopping (sorry) on other pressing matters and goes against the conventional wisdom that it can't or won't. Take new funding for roads, bridges and SEPTA. You've heard about our infrastructure: basically Iraq after Operation Iraqi Freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2011 | By Howard Shapiro, Inquirer Staff Writer
In Kimberly Akimbo , which opened Thursday and is getting a good ride at Theatre Horizon in Norristown, playwright David Lindsay-Abaire calls for an actress in her 50s to play a 16-year-old. So this is as much a   bow, nice and low, to local actress Maureen Torsney-Weir - who has done a bunch of stage work here as characters her own age - as it is a review of Kimberly Akimbo , by the author of the better-known play Rabbit Hole. Torsney-Weir is convincing and teenaged-all-the-way in a play about a family that includes a girl with the rare and unexplained genetic condition progeria, which ages youngsters inordinately.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2011 | By Howard Gensler
BIG NEWS IN the world of make-up sex - Justin Timberlake and Jessica Biel may be back on. The two Js are "quietly seeing each other again," an unidentified source told Us magazine. "They have been talking the whole time and decided to give it another shot. Jessica really wanted to get back together with him and Justin realized single life is not what it's cracked up to be. " Really? If you're Justin Timberlake, we would guess single life is pretty awesome. On July 3, the couple shared pork tacos at the Black Hoof restaurant in Toronto.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2010 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
I WAS TORN in "Rabbit Hole" between sympathy for a couple who's lost a child, and envy of their fantastic house. Grief is everywhere in the movie, but so are Viking ranges and leaded glass windows, ornate moldings and other fittings appropriate to a fantastic period renovation/updating of their century-old home. As you've probably heard, though, this is not a movie about real estate (although the carved-wood front door does open to fantastic views of the Hudson). Gawking gives way to a consideration of grief.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
There are moments early in the domestic vignette Rabbit Hole , starring Nicole Kidman and Aaron Eckhart as a couple estranged by that which shall not be spoken, when they seem like cousins of George and Martha in Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Wrenching, poignant, and quietly healing, John Cameron Mitchell's adaptation of David Lindsay-Abaire's Pulitzer Prize-winning play soon reveals what has come between the tightly wound Becca (Kidman) and the unraveling Howie (Eckhart)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010
Alice in Wonderland . (Walt Disney Pictures, '10) $29.99. 108 mins. Alice, now 19, slips into a rabbit hole that takes her to "Underland," where she must terminate the Red Queen's reign to save her childhood friends. With Johnny Depp, Mia Wasikowska. PG (fantasy action/violence involving scary images and situations) (CC) The Wolfman 1/2 (Universal, '10) $29.98. 103 mins. An actor who goes home to investigate the savage death of his brother is bitten by a creature. R (bloody horror violence and gore)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Steven Rea and Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITICS
The new year, and new decade, get going with new entries from a formidable trio of top-tier Hollywood auteurs: There's a lysergic-looking reimagining of Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland from Tim Burton; a roiling Gothic thriller, Shutter Island, from the just-honored-at-the-Golden Globes Martin Scorsese, and a timely revisit to the trading floors in Oliver Stone's Wall Street sequel. In the horror vein, The Wolfman, with Benicio Del Toro in lycanthrope mode, looks hair-raising.
FOOD
December 3, 2009 | By Dianna Marder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Food and drink are not uncommon stage props. But in most theater productions, the actors don't actually eat and drink, so the food is often faked. Not so for the Arden Theatre Company's production of Rabbit Hole, which requires the actors to eat crème caramel, chocolate cake, apple torte, zucchini bread, and lemon squares in eight performances a week for nine weeks. The play by David Lindsay-Abaire, winner of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for drama, tells the story of a couple fraught with grief after the loss of their young son. Becca, the distraught mother, who left her Sotheby's real estate job to be a full-time mom, bakes with a renewed fury to cope with her son's death.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2009 | By SHAUN BRADY For the Daily News
JUST BEFORE the time-pressed White Rabbit appears in the opening moments of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," Alice finds herself bored out of her mind, sitting beside a riverbank with her sister's dull book offering nothing in the way of entertainment. "What is the use of a book," Alice moans, "without pictures or conversations?" Of course, Alice shortly thereafter discovers an entire world full of amusing and nonsensical distractions, but had the rabbit hole dropped her into modern-day Philadelphia, she would have a couple of options to fulfill her demands.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2009 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
Sometimes it's obvious why a play wins the Pulitzer Prize. Rabbit Hole, by David Lindsay-Abaire, currently at the Arden Theatre and directed by James J. Christy, is a cathartic crowd-pleaser: Waves of compassion flow toward the stage, nods of understanding in the dark. I was waving and nodding too, in Act One. But by Act Two the predictability of the events, of the emotions, of the responses, of the reconciliations, was so obvious that I felt I'd seen the play before, which I hadn't.
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