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Rabies Vaccine

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NEWS
December 3, 1986 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wistar Institute appears not to have violated National Institutes of Health guidelines on genetic-engineering research when it conducted an experiment involving a rabies vaccine in Argentina last summer, a top NIH official said yesterday. Dr. Bernard Talbot, deputy director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, one of the member institutes of NIH, said it appeared that no NIH funds were used to carry out the experiment in Azul, Argentina, and thus NIH guidelines were not violated.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia's battle lines against rabies may be sagging on two fronts, but the strategists are working on the next moves in a broader war. Scientists from Philadelphia's Wistar Institute are seeking state and federal approval to test a genetically engineered rabies vaccine on raccoons. The tests, to be conducted on state game lands about 15 miles west of Scranton, could begin as early as next spring. The Wistar scientists are going ahead with the tests on the new vaccine - served up to raccoons in fish-flavored baits - even as they've been forced to stop using more traditional immunization methods in Philadelphia parks.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wistar Institute in Philadelphia has asked the federal government for permission to conduct the first field tests of a genetically engineered vaccine in the United States. Institute officials said yesterday that they have asked the U.S. Department of Agriculture for approval to test an experimental rabies vaccine on raccoons and other wildlife on uninhabited islands off the coast of Virginia and South Carolina later this year. The institute is seeking to test the same vaccine that caused a storm of controversy when it was used on cattle in Azul, Argentina, in 1986.
NEWS
April 12, 1989 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
South Carolina health officials have rejected a proposal by the Wistar Institute to conduct the first field test of a genetically engineered wildlife vaccine in North America on two uninhabited islands off the South Carolina coast. The rejection of the field trial appears to have dimmed the likelihood that the Philadelphia-based institute will be able to test its controversial rabies vaccine this year. Wistar officials have said they need to start the field trials no later than May if the tests are to be performed in 1989.
NEWS
July 7, 1989 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Virginia health officials have given the Wistar Institute in Philadelphia permission to conduct the first field test of a genetically engineered wildlife vaccine in North America on an uninhabited island off the Atlantic coast. While some details still need to be worked out, Wistar officials say they are optimistic that tests of their rabies vaccine will begin on Parramore Island, a barrier island about 120 miles southeast of Washington, sometime around Labor Day. "All of us here feel pretty good about the approval," said Warren B. Cheston, associate director of Wistar, the nation's oldest biomedical institute.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | By Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Raccoons that scarf up a fish-flavored dinner on a sandy Virginia island next week will move to the front line in the battle against rabies - a struggle currently being waged in Philadelphia and neighboring communities. The raccoons will be unwitting medical pioneers. They'll be testing the first genetically engineered vaccine ever tried outside the laboratory in the United States. Scientists from Philadelphia's Wistar Institute, a research institution on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, will begin setting out baits laced with fish oil and the new rabies vaccine Monday on Parramore Island, 4 1/2 miles off the Atlantic coast of Virginia's Eastern Shore.
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / JILL ANNA GREENBERG
GETTING A LITTLE COMFORT from technician Karyn Rowland is Bun Bun, a beagle owned by Nancy Steacker. Veterinarian Arlene Ronis gives Bun Bun the rabies vaccine. The beagle joined about 300 other pets at a Wrightstown fairground Sunday for a dose of preventive medicine. The clinic was a response to an increase in the disease.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kasey Riemer thought her friend would find the tale amusing: Chasing a bat around the house in the middle of the night, her cats and dogs woke up the family. Her friend, a nurse, wasn't amused. She informed Riemer that she, her husband, and two daughters needed to get to an emergency room pronto to get rabies treatment. "I didn't think the bat bit anyone, so I thought we'd be fine," said Riemer, 51, who lives in Wayne. After a few calls to doctors and even one to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Riemer took her friend's advice, and the family headed off to Bryn Mawr Hospital.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | By Gordon Mayer, Special to The Inquirer
The spread of rabies in Burlington County is following a pattern seen in other counties by confining itself primarily to raccoons, a county public health official said last week. Lumberton and Pemberton Borough last week both reported their first cases of rabid raccoons. Delran, Florence, Mansfield, Pemberton Township and Springfield reported one new rabid raccoon case each. The raccoon rabies epizootic, which describes an epidemic among animals, had infected 38 raccoons and one groundhog in the county as of last Wednesday, said Walter Trommelen, Burlington County public health coordinator.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | By Robert DiGiacomo, Special to The Inquirer
First, some bad news about rabies, which has reached epidemic proportions in much of the mid-Atlantic region: The deadly disease is likely to hit the Camden-Burlington County area by next spring. And once it's here, it can never be eliminated completely. There's also some good news about the disease, which already has infected hundreds of raccoons and other animals in eastern Pennsylvania and northern New Jersey. The disease is treatable in humans - the last death from rabies in New Jersey was in 1971 - and health officials expect the number of cases in animals to peak in about five years.
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NEWS
October 6, 2014 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a bleach-white laboratory on the fifth floor of an austere building at Thomas Jefferson University, Matthias J. Schnell plays with biological grenades. Schnell is a microbiologist who specializes in filoviruses - the microorganisms that cause hemorrhagic fevers, such as Ebola. For more than a decade, he has been working on vaccines to prevent the kind of tragedy now ravaging thousands of people in West Africa. "Filovirus research was a very unimportant field," said Schnell, director of the Jefferson Vaccine Center.
NEWS
September 22, 2014 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kasey Riemer thought her friend would find the tale amusing: Chasing a bat around the house in the middle of the night, her cats and dogs woke up the family. Her friend, a nurse, wasn't amused. She informed Riemer that she, her husband, and two daughters needed to get to an emergency room pronto to get rabies treatment. "I didn't think the bat bit anyone, so I thought we'd be fine," said Riemer, 51, who lives in Wayne. After a few calls to doctors and even one to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Riemer took her friend's advice, and the family headed off to Bryn Mawr Hospital.
NEWS
April 15, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hilary Koprowski, a virologist and former director of the Wistar Institute who developed the first polio vaccine and helped improve the rabies vaccine for humans, has died. Koprowski, who was 96 and had been in declining health in recent months, died Thursday of pneumonia at his home in Wynnewood, according to his son Christopher Koprowski, chief of radiation oncology at the Helen F. Graham Cancer Center at the Christiana Care Health System. "Hilary Koprowski left an enduring mark on medical science and the health of humankind, and his many accomplishments serve as a testament to his legacy," said Russel E. Kaufman, president and chief executive officer of the Wistar Institute.
NEWS
March 17, 2013
Rabies probe reaches 5 states Public health agencies in five states are assessing the rabies risk for hundreds of people who may have had close contact with an infected organ donor and four transplant recipients, one of whom died, officials said Saturday. About 200 medical workers, relatives, and others were assessed for potential exposure in Maryland, where the man who received an infected kidney died, state veterinarian Katherine Feldman said. In Florida, about 90 people were identified as potentially exposed, and three were offered the rabies vaccine as of Friday, state health department spokeswoman Ashley Carr said.
NEWS
January 6, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Gloucester Township family is being treated for exposure to rabies after taking in a sick stray kitten that died a day later, Camden County health officials said Friday. The unidentified family of two adults and two children found the kitten Tuesday night and tried to nurse it back to health, the officials said in a statement. But the kitten died Wednesday night, and a township animal control officer who picked it up arranged to have it tested for rabies the next morning. Test results came back positive Friday, and officials told the family members they would have to receive rabies prophylaxis shots because of their exposure to the animal.
NEWS
October 15, 1993 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you think kids are vaccinated against a lot of diseases today, just wait till the 21st century. Stanley Plotkin, a pediatrician who specializes in vaccine research, believes that by 2025, the average American will be vaccinated against about 30 diseases, including AIDS and genital herpes. People in developing countries could be protected against another 10. There will be vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus and parainfluenza, two childhood respiratory diseases; for hepatitis A, B, C and E; for chickenpox; for Epstein-Barr virus, and for Lyme disease.
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | By Sabrina Walters, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Officials here are considering drafting an ordinance that would require cats to be licensed and vaccinated against rabies. "Council has said they would talk about it," Mayor Ann Mullen said last week. Of the state's 567 municipalities, more than 200 already have ordinances regulating cat ownership. "It's true that the courts at one time put cats down as wild, untrained animals," Mullen said. "You rarely see cats controlled, walking on a leash. " The trend to regulate cat ownership started about four years ago when the New Jersey Department of Health started tracking the spread of rabies cases, which by 1989 had reached epidemic numbers.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | By Mac Daniel, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Montgomery County health officials warned residents yesterday to have their pets vaccinated against rabies now that four cases of animal rabies - an unusually high number - have been reported in the first weeks of 1993. Animal rabies cases have been reported this year in Douglas, Upper Pottsgrove, Lower Providence and Upper Frederick Townships, said Gary Gurian, director of the county Health Department. No people have been victims in these rabies cases, he said. By this time last year, no rabies cases had been reported; there were 10 cases all year.
NEWS
July 8, 1992 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Early last evening, Terry walked into his doctor's office, stuck out his arm and hoped he was making history. Terry, who asked that his real name not be published, participated in the clinical trials of the AIDS vaccine developed by Jonas Salk. The vaccine is designed to treat people already infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. It works similarly to the rabies vaccine, which is administered after a person is exposed to rabies. A buoyant 42-year-old, Terry received treatment throughout last year, not knowing whether he was being injected with the genuine, milky-white vaccine or with a placebo.
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