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Race And Class

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2005 | By Annette John-Hall INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Playwright Tracey Scott Wilson grew up in the kind of solid, middle-class family where race consciousness permeated the household like the smell of greens cooking in the kitchen. The politics of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Black Panthers were both fair game for dinnertime discussion. Wilson's mother, a nurse, and her father, a manager at the Port Authority, all but banned Tracey and her three older siblings from watching television - that is, unless an African American was on. Such an event caused the whole family to gather around the tube, and they'd call up their Newark, N.J., neighbors to make sure they were tuned in as well.
NEWS
January 14, 2013
Sol Yurick, 87, whose street-gang novel The Warriors was adapted into a film of the same title that became a cult favorite, has died. His daughter, Susanna Yurick, said the author died of complications from lung cancer Jan. 5 at Beth Israel Hospital in Manhattan. A native and longtime resident of New York City, he drew upon his years working in the Welfare Department for The Warriors , his first book, which came out in 1965. The movie, released in 1979, was directed by Walter Hill and substantially changed from Mr. Yurick's book.
NEWS
April 29, 1999 | By Acel Moore
To a parent, the death of a child - particularly one who is murdered or accidentally killed by other children - always evokes in me the most profound emotions. Three incidents last week had a chilling effect on my psyche. The first, and the one that has gotten the most national attention, was the massacre of 12 high school students and one teacher by two of their classmates in Littleton, Colo., an upper-middle-class suburb of Denver. The two perpetrators, ages 17 and 18, were heavily armed with guns and pipe bombs.
NEWS
November 12, 1994 | By SALLY STEENLAND
Listen to these IQs of the rich and famous, as reported in the media. A very bright Madonna (140) outshines John F. Kennedy (119), who's slightly above normal. The extremely brilliant Reggie Jackson (160) scores above them both. Gangster John Gotti (110) is stuck with mid-level smarts. And poor J.D. Salinger (104) is merely average. What do these numbers mean? That Madonna would make a top-notch president? That Kennedy could've written better novels than Salinger? That Reggie Jackson should run the world?
NEWS
December 23, 1992 | By Anne L. Boles, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As with zillions of other grade schools in countless small towns, the holiday season at East Fallowfield Elementary School means a big recital. The children had practiced their instruments, such as glockenspiels and tambourines. They filed into an auditorium festooned with American Indian dolls with brown, white and orange faces. Then their voices chimed old favorites from Israel and Liberia. Merry Christmas, everyone - and Happy Hanukah and Happy Kwanzaa. Confused over all the different holiday celebrations?
NEWS
May 12, 1989 | By ELLIS COSE, From the New York
A 29-year-old woman goes to the top of a 21-story building to watch a sunrise. There, two armed men rape her and force her to jump from the roof. She grabs a television cable that miraculously breaks her fall. She holds on, naked and screaming, until residents of the building save her life. The story makes the inside pages of New York's newspapers. Life in the city goes on. Weeks later, a 28-year-old woman goes out for an evening jog. She is beaten, gang-raped and left for dead.
NEWS
November 5, 2008
WE HAVE HOPE. Of course, that word was the cornerstone of Barack Obama's campaign, but it took his historic victory yesterday to make us realize how much of it we have been missing. Steadily, over the years, we have felt the erosion of hope for a country united on the principles of democracy and fairness, a country that could once again lead the world based, not on military might, but on a steadfast defense of human rights. For so long, we have missed the hope that ordinary people could join together to bring about change.
NEWS
February 21, 2006
IREAD with interest Dave Davies' overview of the pros and cons of the new stadiums (Feb. 16). While I believe the article was fair and thorough, I was surprised that no mention was made of the Children's Fund, which was a part of the final negotiation. The fund promised to provide $2 million a year for 20 years (half each from the Phillies and Eagles) for programs and services for Philadelphia's children and families. At the time, many of us took no position on the pros or cons of the stadiums, but we were clear that if the public were to invest in playgrounds for higher-income adults, we ought to be making sure Philadelphia neighborhood children could benefit as well.
NEWS
July 28, 1993
In their attempts to frustrate President Clinton by impeding passage of his national-service initiative, Senate Republicans have shown that their party is so obsessed with sticking it to President Clinton that any thought of doing what's good for the country has vanished from their thought processes. National service, a plan that lets college students partly pay off tuition loans by doing needed work to help the country, is no new, untested concept. Its roots are found in the GI Bill, the Peace Corps, VISTA and numerous state programs.
NEWS
December 12, 2000 | by Judy Wicks
As a Philadelphia business owner concerned with social responsibility in business, I support the nonviolent demonstrators who exercised their First Amendment rights during the Republican National Convention this summer. Along with many of my peers in the business community, I agreed with the demonstrators voicing their concerns over the increasing influence of corporations in public life. While we do not condone property destruction or intentional violence, we endorse this movement as an important voice for change.
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NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Critics pricked up their ears two years ago when screenwriter John Ridley, riding high on the critical acclaim of 12 Years a Slave , announced he was developing a TV drama.       It would be a different kind of crime drama, he said. Ridley, who won an Oscar the following year, stayed true to his promise: American Crime , which premieres at 10 p.m. Thursday on ABC, is one of the most powerful and original dramas to grace the broadcast networks in years. If the first three episodes are any indication, it will rank with HBO's True Detective as the best TV series about crime in America.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | BY MARK STERN
I IMAGINE THAT Aretha Franklin educated many on what respect means and how to spell it. Her 1967 cover of an Otis Redding tune became popular at a time when civil rights in relation to race, class and gender were on the minds of many. She leaves no room for misunderstandings about what she wants. She just spells it out: "R-E-S-P-E-C-T. " No confusion. No metaphor. No nuthin'. "Give me my propers ," she demands. Give it to me. And, as with any good demand, therein also lies a threat: See what happens if you don't.
NEWS
January 14, 2013
Sol Yurick, 87, whose street-gang novel The Warriors was adapted into a film of the same title that became a cult favorite, has died. His daughter, Susanna Yurick, said the author died of complications from lung cancer Jan. 5 at Beth Israel Hospital in Manhattan. A native and longtime resident of New York City, he drew upon his years working in the Welfare Department for The Warriors , his first book, which came out in 1965. The movie, released in 1979, was directed by Walter Hill and substantially changed from Mr. Yurick's book.
NEWS
March 25, 2012
By Eric Goodman University of Nebraska Press. 288 pages. $18.95. Reviewed by John Shortino Within the first few pages of Twelfth and Race , Eric Goodman introduces many of his novel's major themes: racial tension, family secrets, parental abandonment, and the loss of identity. As the book opens, Lorraine, a young mother, leaves her family and mixed-race son, driven away in part by their rejection of her Puerto Rican boyfriend. Her son, Richard, grows up to have his identity stolen.
NEWS
July 27, 2009
WAS THE police officer who arrested Henry Louis Gates in his Cambridge home a racist, or did Gates overreact to a cop just doing his job? Did President Obama make matters worse when he commented on the case during a Wednesday news conference, or did he make an important point? Is that conversation, being carried out over Internet, TV, radio and print, the same one that's being conducted in Philadelphia over the controversial Domelights Web site? A week after Gates was arrested, these questions - and what they mean in "post-racial" America - are still being hotly debated.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2008 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
'The truth makes for a bad sermon. It tends to be confusing and have no clear conclusion. " So says Father Flynn from the pulpit of St. Nicholas, the Bronx church where this young and popular priest has set up shop in the fall of 1964. In Doubt , John Patrick Shanley's crisp, cogent adaptation of his own Pulitzer- and Tony-winning play (tellingly called Doubt, a Parable when it debuted in New York in 2004), the truth is left for the audience to decide. And while the conclusion isn't necessarily clear, it is unsettling.
NEWS
November 5, 2008
WE HAVE HOPE. Of course, that word was the cornerstone of Barack Obama's campaign, but it took his historic victory yesterday to make us realize how much of it we have been missing. Steadily, over the years, we have felt the erosion of hope for a country united on the principles of democracy and fairness, a country that could once again lead the world based, not on military might, but on a steadfast defense of human rights. For so long, we have missed the hope that ordinary people could join together to bring about change.
NEWS
June 11, 2008 | By CHAD DION LASSITER
IT CAN BE argued that the conventional and traditional institutions (family, schools, churches, business, government) are out of step with the needs of children and youth - specifically black children and youth. Many of the black youngsters whom I've worked with in Philadelphia over the last 15 years are nothing more than canaries in the coal mine who reflect the conditions in their environment, the physical and social toxins. The cumulative effect of the negatives and hassles in the world these young people live in has traumatized and stifled any resiliency that might help them overcome the odds.
NEWS
May 13, 2007
Looking at how a candidate campaigns can offer clues as to what kind of leader he'd be. Philadelphians say they yearn for a leader who'll be mayor of the whole city, who'll rise above the grubby same-old, same-old at City Hall, who'll offer both vision and focus, who'll put city before self, who'll reach for new alliances with suburbs and Harrisburg. There's only one candidate in this race who has risen steadily in the polls by drawing support from all races and all neighborhoods, while the other candidates drooped.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2007 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
The United States might not know who Russell Peters is, the Anglo Indian comedian from Canada whose snarky smarts, crackling characterizations of racial stereotypes, and well-heeled mimicry have made him the toast of the North (not to mention the rest of the planet) for nearly 20 years. But we're about to find out. Right after he wakes up. "I forgot we were supposed to talk until my brother knocked on my door," Peters says from the home in Toronto he shares with his sibling.
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