CollectionsRace Riots
IN THE NEWS

Race Riots

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 30, 2001 | By Claude Lewis
More than 20 police officers were injured two nights ago in a violent clash sparked by racial tension. The conflagration did not take place in Selma, Birmingham or Cincinnati. This time it happened thousands of miles away in Oldham, a northwest British town where curried rice is a far more popular dish than fish and chips. The battle in England did not involve blacks and whites, but whites and Asians. English authorities, facing an election in a little more than a week, quickly grabbed up every available microphone and went out into the streets to perform damage control.
NEWS
January 9, 1990 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barely five months ago, black protesters dared to picnic on a whites-only beach near Cape Town. Riot police, backed by a helicopter and snarling dogs, drove them away with whips and clubs. This month, thousands of blacks have swarmed over previously whites-only beaches across South Africa. The police have stayed away, along with some resentful whites. But thousands of other whites have mingled peacefully with blacks, sharing sands that for decades had been officially segregated.
NEWS
July 6, 2002 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Max Gordon, 99, a longtime shopkeeper in North Philadelphia who made headlines for guarding his business with a club during the 1964 race riots, died Thursday. Mr. Gordon was born in Ukraine and came to the United States in 1932 after spending five years in Cuba, said Frances Shusterman, his daughter. In Cuba, he met his future wife, Anna Zitman, who was from the same Ukrainian hometown as Mr. Gordon. In Philadelphia, Mr. Gordon ran a hosiery stand for several years before he opened his store, Gordon's Hosiery and Women's Apparel, at 917 N. Marshall St. He lived upstairs with his wife.
NEWS
July 24, 2001 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Charles Robertson, one of nine white men charged with killing a black woman during race riots in 1969, pleaded not guilty at his arraignment yesterday. Robertson, 67, emerged from the brief proceeding at the York County Courthouse saying that he was "very confident" he would be cleared of the murder charge. "My job is to run the city of York," he said. Robertson's attorney, William Costopoulos, said he would file a motion seeking to dismiss the case because the charges against his client "do not rise to the level of murder.
NEWS
March 25, 2012
By Eric Goodman University of Nebraska Press. 288 pages. $18.95. Reviewed by John Shortino Within the first few pages of Twelfth and Race , Eric Goodman introduces many of his novel's major themes: racial tension, family secrets, parental abandonment, and the loss of identity. As the book opens, Lorraine, a young mother, leaves her family and mixed-race son, driven away in part by their rejection of her Puerto Rican boyfriend. Her son, Richard, grows up to have his identity stolen.
NEWS
March 3, 2004
FIRST the white folks and now the Koreans are getting into the act of blaming black men for their homicides. Mrs. Evisoon Cho, after allegedly bludgeoning to death her niece, said that two black men accosted her outside her Bensalem home. Believable maybe because that's what most people think black men do. As a black man, I know we have enough of our own problems without others blaming us for their shortcomings. Haven't we as black men had enough of the Asbells, Dacris, Stuarts, Susan Smiths and countless others using the black man as their scapegoats?
NEWS
August 15, 2002 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
York County prosecutors dropped murder charges yesterday against four of the 10 defendants in the 1969 shooting death of a black woman, in a move clearly intended to focus their case against former York Mayor Charles Robertson and three other men. In exchange, the white defendants - Rick Knouse, William Ritter, Clarence Lutzinger and Thomas Smith - pleaded guilty to a single conspiracy charge each for their role in the ambush killing of 27-year-old...
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
There were no crack houses, no drug corners, no drive-by shootings. But if you think Philadelphia was peaceful and relatively crime-free in the "good old days," try reading old newspapers. For example, the big story in January 1919 was the trial of Mayor Thomas B. Smith on charges related to the murder of a police detective at the hands of 18 gangsters imported from New York by the mayor's faction of the GOP to crack skulls and terrorize opponents. OK, politics was dirtier in 1919, but the streets were safer.
NEWS
October 19, 1989 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
It's 1989. This is trendy, hip South Street. But Harry C. Silcox doesn't see it that way. When Silcox looks at South Street, it's always Oct. 10, 1871 - Election Day, the day of the great race riots. "Look, there's only one house on this block that is totally unchanged," he says, pointing to a shabby, abandoned property at 814 South St. "That's the boarding house where Octavius Catto lived," he says. And just to prove it, he whips out a photocopy of an 1870 census sheet listing Catto at that address.
NEWS
May 25, 2001 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One week after being indicted on murder charges in the shooting of a black woman during this city's race riots in 1969, Mayor Charles H. Robertson withdrew from the 2001 mayoral race yesterday. The announcement caught Democratic Party officials by surprise. Robertson, whose term is scheduled to end in January, had repeatedly said he would neither resign nor drop out of the race. Two days before his indictment, the two-term mayor won a narrow primary victory over challenger Ray Crenshaw.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 25, 2012
By Eric Goodman University of Nebraska Press. 288 pages. $18.95. Reviewed by John Shortino Within the first few pages of Twelfth and Race , Eric Goodman introduces many of his novel's major themes: racial tension, family secrets, parental abandonment, and the loss of identity. As the book opens, Lorraine, a young mother, leaves her family and mixed-race son, driven away in part by their rejection of her Puerto Rican boyfriend. Her son, Richard, grows up to have his identity stolen.
NEWS
November 9, 2007 | By Dianna Marder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"Tell me," Vera Cramer Hershenberg urged her 80-year-old father. "Tell me about where you grew up, and why you became a doctor. Tell me how you want to be remembered. " And with that, David Cramer's story, of a Jewish doctor tending to African American families in North Philadelphia during race riots in the late 1960s, poured out. "I was never afraid," he said. "When the riots started, my patients came and sat on my steps and made sure nothing happened to me or my office. " Cramer, of Center City, was speaking to his oldest daughter, but he was speaking for posterity - for his grandchildren and for everyone else's.
NEWS
March 3, 2004
FIRST the white folks and now the Koreans are getting into the act of blaming black men for their homicides. Mrs. Evisoon Cho, after allegedly bludgeoning to death her niece, said that two black men accosted her outside her Bensalem home. Believable maybe because that's what most people think black men do. As a black man, I know we have enough of our own problems without others blaming us for their shortcomings. Haven't we as black men had enough of the Asbells, Dacris, Stuarts, Susan Smiths and countless others using the black man as their scapegoats?
NEWS
March 14, 2003 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two black men were convicted yesterday in the 1969 shooting of a white police officer, bringing resolution to the second of two long-buried civil-rights-era murders and bringing solace to yet another family whose long wait for justice was finally over. The jury - 11 whites and one black - deliberated seven hours before finding Leon "Smickel" Wright and Stephen Freeland guilty of second-degree murder in the shooting death of Officer Henry Schaad. The verdicts yesterday came more than three years after York County prosecutors reopened the investigations into the two unsolved killings that took place during the city's 10-day race riots.
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than three decades after a young black woman was gunned down at the height of the city's race riots, an all-white jury yesterday convicted two white men of her murder and acquitted the former York mayor who prosecutors said orchestrated the attack. The jury of six men and six women took 10 hours to convict Robert Messersmith, 53, and Gregory Neff, 54, of second-degree murder in the shotgun slaying of Lillie Belle Allen on July 21, 1969. The 27-year-old mother of two from Aiken, S.C., was visiting relatives when she and four family members drove into an ambush involving about 100 youths, many of whom aimed weapons at the car. Allen, a preacher's daughter, was shot after leaving the car to take the wheel from her panicked sister.
NEWS
August 15, 2002 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
York County prosecutors dropped murder charges yesterday against four of the 10 defendants in the 1969 shooting death of a black woman, in a move clearly intended to focus their case against former York Mayor Charles Robertson and three other men. In exchange, the white defendants - Rick Knouse, William Ritter, Clarence Lutzinger and Thomas Smith - pleaded guilty to a single conspiracy charge each for their role in the ambush killing of 27-year-old...
NEWS
July 6, 2002 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Max Gordon, 99, a longtime shopkeeper in North Philadelphia who made headlines for guarding his business with a club during the 1964 race riots, died Thursday. Mr. Gordon was born in Ukraine and came to the United States in 1932 after spending five years in Cuba, said Frances Shusterman, his daughter. In Cuba, he met his future wife, Anna Zitman, who was from the same Ukrainian hometown as Mr. Gordon. In Philadelphia, Mr. Gordon ran a hosiery stand for several years before he opened his store, Gordon's Hosiery and Women's Apparel, at 917 N. Marshall St. He lived upstairs with his wife.
NEWS
January 6, 2002
Does anyone really believe this stuff? Yes Judging a religion by its worst exemplars and most repulsive acts is like judging an individual or a nation by the worst they've ever done ("Does anyone really believe this stuff?" Jan. 1). I would hate to have my life appraised solely on the basis of my most stupid statements and most selfish behaviors. Would any of us believe in what the United States stands for if all we knew was slaveholding, massacres of Native Americans, entrenched poverty, slums, race riots, lynchings and the exploitation of meat packers?
NEWS
December 19, 2001 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A judge rejected a defense motion yesterday that sought to have all charges dismissed in a 1969 race-riot slaying, clearing the way for Mayor Charles H. Robertson and eight other white men to stand trial in the killing of a black woman. Bucks County Court Senior Judge Edward G. Biester Jr. said that, despite the decades-long delay in prosecuting the case, he found no prejudice or intentional delay on the part of police or York County district attorneys. "I can make no finding that the delay was the result of negligence . . . that would have compromised any defendant's case," said Biester, who was appointed to hear the motion after York County Court Judge John Uhler, a former York prosecutor, recused himself.
NEWS
November 20, 2001 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seven months after Mayor Charles H. Robertson and eight other white men were charged with killing a black woman during race riots in 1969, defense attorneys seeking dismissal of the charges are trying to show that the 32-year prosecution delay has unfairly jeopardized their clients' chances for a fair trial. At a pretrial hearing in York County Court yesterday, defense attorneys sought to determine why it took that many years to indict suspects in the murder of Lillie Belle Allen, 27, one of two people slain in the 10 days of rioting.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|