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Racial Equality

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NEWS
June 25, 1999 | By Kristen A. Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hoping to spur meaningful discussion about the state of race relations in Delaware County, a diversity group last night held the first in a series of events aimed at promoting racial equality. The Countywide Diversity Coalition, recently formed by the Media Fellowship House, the Media branch of the NAACP and the League of Women Voters, sponsored the event, which formally launched the group's study circle program. Paul Patchel, program director of the Media Fellowship House, a nonprofit agency that promotes ethnic and racial harmony, called the study circles "small, democratic, and highly participatory.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | By Gerald B. Jordan, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A majority of Americans support programs aimed at helping disadvantaged blacks and other minorities, according to a Harris poll done for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund. The results, released yesterday in a report called "The Unfinished Agenda on Race in America," showed substantial agreement among whites and blacks on ways to achieve racial equality in the United States. About 53 percent of those polled agreed that more should be done to help disadvantaged blacks and other minorities in the next administration than was done during the Reagan years.
NEWS
August 8, 2002
RE THE LETTER "Jacko Wacko on Race Charge" by D. Williams. Williams claims that "Invincible" is a "poor-selling dud" and insinuates that is the reason Jackson is making claims of racism against the music industry. "Invincible" was released in October 2001, yet Billboard Magazine listed the album as No. 11 in the top 20 best-selling albums of 2001, with sales of 5.4 million. It's quite an accomplishment to be listed on the top 20 best-sellers list with only two months of sales. I'd hardly call that a dud. To date, the sales of the album are estimated at 10 million and that is without promotion from Sony.
NEWS
June 20, 2005
RE ROTAN LEE's June 16 op-ed ("Reparations: Its time has come"): Let's sue corporate America because certain companies had slaves. This is the very reason we will never have racial equality in this country. We need to let this go. But we won't. Somebody will always be up in the pulpit shouting that the black people of this country deserve justice. It should not be the concern of the modern world to pay for the wrongdoings of something long abolished. It is clear that the leaders of the black community want to keep this line drawn in the sand.
NEWS
April 20, 1999 | By Angela Galloway, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Dorothy H.L. Carroll was among the protesters who picketed for racial equality in Chester County in the 1960s. She is still on the front lines. Carroll and a dozen other members of the Human Relations Council of Greater West Chester will hold a public forum tonight to ask local residents where they want to see the fight for equality go in coming years. "We want to find out what people are concerned about," said Carroll, co-chairwoman of the council. "It's to investigate and to discuss how people see racism affecting our community and in what areas people want us to work.
NEWS
October 9, 1986 | By Rich Mkhondo, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Leon Sullivan was presented with the Clarence Farmer Human Rights Service Award yesterday by the city's Human Relations Commission. "As an author, scholar, teacher and preacher, the reverend's voice for equality and the need to improve intergroup harmony has been heard throughout the world," commission chairman James S. Allen said of Mr. Sullivan. Mr. Sullivan, architect of the Sullivan Principles - a code of conduct for U.S. companies in South Africa that commits those that subscribe to it to racial equality in hiring, pay and promotions - called on people of all races "to come together to avoid another unfolding of violence and unrest which rocked this country in the '60s.
NEWS
October 4, 1995
Nearly three out of four Philadelphia residents say there is little or no racial or ethnic tension in their neighborhoods. And yet across America, issues of race crop up in discussions about the criminal justice system, affirmative action, and the government's responsibility to the poor and disadvantaged. We've heard a lot from adults on this subject, but not enough from the young people growing up in an era when civil rights are the law, but racial equality may still be elusive.
NEWS
June 11, 2013
By Charles A. Gallagher Two events that took place just hours apart 50 years ago serve as a metaphor for our nation's struggle for racial equality. On June 11, 1963, John F. Kennedy gave a speech to the nation demanding that the federal government aggressively put in place measures to guarantee the constitutional rights of blacks. JFK was comprehensive in his goals, insisting that the federal government be actively involved in addressing institutional racism in housing, the labor market, schooling, access to voting, and public accommodations.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | By Jamie Catrambone, Special to The Inquirer
In his address at the 135th Lincoln University commencement exercises Sunday, Gov. Casey stressed the importance of family in education and applauded the support and sacrifices made by the graduates' families. After receiving an honorary Doctor of Law degree, Casey expressed great satisfaction in the accomplishments of the 244 graduates and their families and said he felt "the great sense of pride" being experienced by those people. "I'm really very touched and moved that you have asked me to be a part of a family celebration," he said.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Terry Smith
Among other race-baiting, presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has referred to the nation's first African American president as a "food stamp president," and someone who engages in "Kenyan, anti-colonial behavior," a coarse reference to President Obama's African father and a nod to "birtherism. " Not content merely to demean the president, Gingrich has said that poor black children lack role models and a work ethic - a broadside against millions of black, working-poor parents who each day serve as shepherds for their children and instill in them work and other ethics.
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NEWS
June 11, 2013
By Charles A. Gallagher Two events that took place just hours apart 50 years ago serve as a metaphor for our nation's struggle for racial equality. On June 11, 1963, John F. Kennedy gave a speech to the nation demanding that the federal government aggressively put in place measures to guarantee the constitutional rights of blacks. JFK was comprehensive in his goals, insisting that the federal government be actively involved in addressing institutional racism in housing, the labor market, schooling, access to voting, and public accommodations.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | George Parry
It may be time to cancel the lynching. A month ago, in a gated community in central Florida, a neighborhood watch volunteer named George Zimmerman confronted a hoodie-wearing black teenager named Trayvon Martin. According to witnesses, a scuffle ensued, and it ended when Zimmerman shot and killed Martin. After investigating, the police did not bring charges. And then Jesse Jackson intoned that black Americans are "under attack. " The New Black Panther Party posted a $10,000 reward for Zimmerman's capture.
NEWS
February 6, 2012 | By Kevin Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Despite its significant history, the Grand Army of the Republic Museum and Library in Philadelphia is an unimposing structure - save for the two armed guards standing out front. Bedecked in Union blue, the guards leaned on their rifles Sunday ushering in patrons with a tip of the kepi. During the first Sunday of each month, the museum opens its doors to the public and invites speakers to discuss topics that have thematic relevance. In recognition of February's being Black History Month, Sunday's topic was a man who was a major advocate for racial equality - nearly 100 years before the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Octavius Catto's vast contributions to the cause of civil rights were outlined for an audience of nearly 40 by Andy Waskie, a Civil War historian, professor of foreign languages at Temple University, and member of the museum's board of directors.
NEWS
February 2, 2012 | By Terry Smith
Among other race-baiting, presidential candidate Newt Gingrich has referred to the nation's first African American president as a "food stamp president," and someone who engages in "Kenyan, anti-colonial behavior," a coarse reference to President Obama's African father and a nod to "birtherism. " Not content merely to demean the president, Gingrich has said that poor black children lack role models and a work ethic - a broadside against millions of black, working-poor parents who each day serve as shepherds for their children and instill in them work and other ethics.
NEWS
January 16, 2012
TODAY'S celebration of the Martin Luther King holiday has an obvious geographical focal point: The new King memorial on the Mall in Washington, D.C., dedicated just last October. But it's not likely that the Martin Luther King Jr. of the 1960s would mark this day, or the continuing struggle for justice that it represents, at that place. And as laudable as it is, he might not be satisfied only with volunteering for the MLK Day of Service. Instead, Martin Luther King Jr. probably would be "occupying" Wall Street - or D.C. or Philadelphia or Dubuque - and possibly getting slapped into plastic handcuffs for engaging in civil disobedience.
NEWS
January 18, 2011 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
I LOVE THE Martin Luther King Day of Service. But I think I can improve it. Let me start by saying how great it is that, on the third Monday of every January, more and more people are observing this federally created holiday as "a day on, not a day off. " The 16-year-old event has passionate local support. Yesterday, 75,000 people in the Delaware Valley volunteered in 1,200 projects - like retooling computers for the poor, painting PAL centers, creating care packages for sick kids and distributing food boxes to the elderly.
NEWS
September 12, 2010 | By Daniel R. Biddle and Murray Dubin
Their speeches rang with names of battles where black soldiers had died for the Union. Their petitions swelled with testimony from wives and mothers brutalized for trying to ride streetcars to visit loved ones in Army hospitals. But the drive by black activists and their white allies to integrate those horse-drawn cars had been sabotaged and stalled in Harrisburg in 1865. So their fledgling group, the Equal Rights League, sent a new colored lobbyist from Philadelphia to climb the Capitol's marble steps.
NEWS
August 25, 2008 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In The Black List, Volume One, a richly illuminating documentary about the African American experience in the 21st century, Vernon Jordan, the lawyer, businessman and Friend of Bill, reflects on exactly how wide and disparate that experience may be. "We are just as mixed up in views and needs, aspirations, as any other group of people. It's never been monolithic," Jordan asserts, criticizing white culture's need to "define" blacks. "There's always been a difference of opinion, a difference of approach.
NEWS
June 20, 2005
RE ROTAN LEE's June 16 op-ed ("Reparations: Its time has come"): Let's sue corporate America because certain companies had slaves. This is the very reason we will never have racial equality in this country. We need to let this go. But we won't. Somebody will always be up in the pulpit shouting that the black people of this country deserve justice. It should not be the concern of the modern world to pay for the wrongdoings of something long abolished. It is clear that the leaders of the black community want to keep this line drawn in the sand.
NEWS
July 15, 2004 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
MISSION accomplished! The NAACP convention isn't over yet, but it has already been a smashing success. All the goals have been met. The racial divide has been widened, so the existence of the organization and its leaders' roles are safe for the foreseeable future. Well done Messrs. Bond, Mfume and Street. The only downside, of course - apparently of little interest to this week's speakers - is that the interests of those who the NAACP claims to represent haven't been enhanced.
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