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NEWS
September 11, 1987 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau (Inquirer wire services contributed to this article.)
The Pentagon, responding to a report by three Democratic congressmen, insisted yesterday that a Soviet radar complex in Siberia could become the keystone of an extensive anti-missile system. The congressional group, headed by Rep. Thomas Downey of New York, was allowed to visit the site Saturday and said it posed little threat. "This radar is a ballistic missile, detection, and tracking radar," said Frank Gaffney, assistant defense secretary for international security policy.
SPORTS
January 10, 2012
THE PHILLIES are kicking the tires of righthanded relief pitcher Kerry Wood, according to several reports. CSNPhilly.com's Jim Salisbury says the Phillies are one of four teams looking at Wood, a free agent who was 3-5 with a 3.35 ERA for the Cubs last season. Anaheim, Cincinnati and Detroit also are reportedly showing interest. A phone call to Wood's agent was not returned. The 34-year-old Wood was shut down in September after tearing the meniscus in his left knee.
NEWS
May 11, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank W. Widmann, 88, of Cherry Hill, a longtime Radio Corp. of America engineer who helped design various significant radars, died Monday, May 3, at Virtua Hospital in Voorhees following a heart attack. After World War II, Mr. Widmann began working as an engineer for RCA in the Moorestown plant. He soon rose to manager of design and development engineering within the missile and surface radar division. While in that position, Mr. Widmann oversaw the development of some high-profile radars, such as the Ballistic Missile Early Warning System (BMEWS)
NEWS
May 14, 2010 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local police departments in Pennsylvania can't use radar to catch speeders, but that will change if a bill introduced Wednesday becomes law. Currently, only state police can use radar. Town and city officers determine speeds by tailing vehicles or using non-radar systems such as VASCAR, which computes speed from measurements of time and distance. Speaking about House bill 2513 Thursday in Abington were three of its 28 sponsors, Democrats Josh Shapiro and Matt Bradford, and Republican Mike Vereb, all of Montgomery County.
NEWS
December 7, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
A senior congressman has interpreted a new Pentagon report to mean that many U.S. weapons "have been rendered potentially obsolete" by Soviet missiles designed to exploit the Defense Department's heavy reliance on radar. The secret report, a joint effort of the Defense Intelligence Agency and the Central Intelligence Agency completed three weeks ago, paints a "far grimmer" picture of the vulnerability of U.S. weapons to Soviet anti-radar missiles than previously acknowledged, Rep. John D. Dingell (D., Mich.
NEWS
November 16, 1990 | By Larry Lewis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Even sleepy drivers on their way to work or grumpy ones on their way home get the message when they see the double white lines painted sideways across the suburban back roads and residential streets. Slow down or get a speeding ticket. The lines are a dead giveaway that police officers with a VASCAR unit probably are parked in a side street or driveway, recording the speeds of passing cars. Heavy-footed drivers also have learned, said Tredyffrin Township Police Superintendent Thomas Baynard, that VASCAR will not catch them as they speed along curved roads or through school zones packed with school buses because the officer using the unit needs 550 feet of clear vision.
NEWS
April 10, 1986 | By Deborrah Wilkinson, Special to The Inquirer
Glassboro Mayor William Dalton took the opportunity at Tuesday's council meeting to warn residents that the borough would begin radar surveillance of traffic on State Street immediately. The action was prompted by reports that motorists entering State Street from West Street or heading along State Street toward Delsea Drive were traveling at up to 50 m.p.h. In a letter read to the council by the borough clerk, the Rev. William Thielking, pastor of the First United Methodist Church, asked for action.
NEWS
May 4, 2001
Oral sex and middle schoolers; freak dancing among 10-year-olds; allegations of rape by boys as young as 9.. . . Such incidents explode onto the front pages of newspapers like so many grenades, leaving many parents wondering whether the generation gap has suddenly morphed into the Grand Canyon.. . .The fact that these examples of precocious, unhealthy sexualization are not on most adults' radar screens speaks legions. For me . . . the surprise is in the surprise. What else do we expect in a culture in which, by age 19, our children have spent nearly 19,000 hours in front of the television . . . and where nearly two-thirds of all television programming has sexual content?
SPORTS
July 14, 2005 | By Don Steinberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kassim Ouma's junior-middleweight championship fight in Las Vegas tonight hasn't received the same media hype as Saturday's Bernard Hopkins-Jermain Taylor extravaganza across town. That's what happens when one event (Hopkins-Taylor) is on pay-per-view at $49.95 per screen and the other (Ouma against Roman Karmazin) will be televised on a weeknight on HBO Latino, in Spanish (10 p.m.). But boxing is boxing in any language, and Ouma, 21-1, is destined for wider exposure. He's a rising star at age 26 who, if he gets past Russian contender Karmazin (31-1)
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ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 9, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
LAS VEGAS - So how good is Malachi Richardson? Although he entered Syracuse as a McDonald's all-American, the shooting guard was not on any NBA team's draft board in the fall. Then Richardson made the Atlantic Coast Conference's all-freshman team and spearheaded the Orange's run to the Final Four. "At the end of the season, he was on everybody's board," said an NBA executive who spoke on the condition of anonymity. A mock draft by CBS.com has the 76ers selecting Richardson with the 24th pick in the June 23 draft.
SPORTS
May 10, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
TOMS RIVER, N.J. - One month from today, the Phillies will be on the clock and a top prospect who pitches his home games 30 minutes away from their single-A Lakewood affiliate will be staring them in the face. Do the Phillies make Barnegat High School's Jay Groome the No. 1 overall selection? There are growing rumblings that the team will look elsewhere with that pick, and one major-league scout said he does not envy the Phillies' situation. "Picking first overall, I'd hate it," a baseball executive said.
SPORTS
April 15, 2016 | By Phil Anastasia, Staff Writer
A pair of bloop doubles produced the first run in the bottom of the sixth. A three-base error on a pickoff throw produced the tying run in the bottom of the seventh. A player called up from the junior-varsity game generated his first career hit at the varsity level and came around to score the winning run in the bottom of the eighth inning. It all went according to plan for Williamstown in a 3-2 victory over Haddon Heights, since the Braves' strategy usually involves scrapping, clawing, and hanging around despite daunting circumstances.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2016
Has America's job market broken? Are we becoming a nation of part-timers? Of underemployed young people and can't-afford-to-be-retirees stitching together low-wage workweeks? That's one view of a "gig economy," in which - except for company owners - all our cars are taxis, our homes are hotels, and none of our weekly hours qualifies for company benefits. So we have to buy high-deductible health plans on the not-so-free market? "Gig work reflects the more flexible or fragmented work arrangements of many in today's labor market," namely Uber and Lyft drivers, TaskRabbit "freelance laborers," Upwork free-lancers, and Etsy salespeople, writes John Silvia, the Pennsylvania native who serves as chief economist at Wells Fargo & Co., in a recent report on the "gig" economy.
SPORTS
January 13, 2016 | By Marc Narducci, STAFF WRITER
Not surprisingly, neither sporting director Earnie Stewart nor coach Jim Curtin was willing to tip his hand when discussing the Union's plans for the Major League Soccer SuperDraft on Thursday. This is the first draft for Stewart and a critical one for a team coming off a 10-17-7 season. The Union will have two of the top six picks. They will select third (their own pick) and sixth, a pick acquired in a trade with Houston. If he is available, it would be a surprise if the Union didn't select left back Brandon Vincent of NCAA champion Stanford at No. 3. Vincent is not attending the MLS combine in Florida for a good reason.
SPORTS
November 5, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
FORT MYERS, Fla. - When Riley Pint walked a batter in his first inning at Perfect Game's national showcase in June, there was a rumble of surprise among the hundreds of observing scouts. In the buildup to this gathering of the nation's best high school players, the lanky Kansan had been portrayed as some sort of baseball ideal, one without pitching or personal flaws. His pre-showcase scouting report from Perfect Game, a website that ranks baseball prospects, raved about a fastball that reached 96 m.p.h.
NEWS
September 17, 2015 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathy Orr , the mighty meteorologist so rudely cashiered by CBS3 two months ago after 12 years of stalwart service, has stuck a perfect landing at Fox 29, where she'll have a regular slot at 5 p.m. and 10 p.m. weekdays. Fox 29 made the announcement with a short statement on Wednesday. Orr, who will debut Sunday evening, chimed in with this tweet: "I love Philadelphia, and am thrilled to continue my career with FOX 29. It's a perfect fit. See U Sunday. " A repeated local Emmy winner and member of the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia Hall of Fame, Orr began her career in the Philly TV market in 1998.
SPORTS
February 19, 2015 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
YESTERDAY, we looked at some of the bigger individual Phillies story lines we'll be monitoring, as pitchers and catchers hold their first official workout tomorrow. Now, let's look at five names who haven't garnered nearly as much attention, but who have more to gain (or lose) than most pitchers and catchers in camp this spring. 1 Miguel Alfredo Gonzalez: At this time last year, the Phillies were hoping that their first significant foray into one of baseball's emerging markets (Cuba, Korea, Japan, etc.)
SPORTS
September 5, 2014 | BY JOHN McGONIGAL, Daily News Staff Writer mcgonij@phillynews.com
STATE COLLEGE - Ohio State's defensive line, now coached by former Penn State coach Larry Johnson, is stocked with future NFL talent. Michigan State's stifling unit is headlined by preseason All-America defensive end Shilique Calhoun. But after taking in the opening week of college football, the preseason talk of premier front fours might have unjustly left a Big Ten unit out of the conversation. "I would say that people overlook us," Penn State defensive tackle Austin Johnson said.
SPORTS
September 5, 2014 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gus Bradley stayed in Philadelphia on Jan. 15, 2013, after an interview with the Eagles, one day away from potentially succeeding Andy Reid as the team's head coach. If not for Chip Kelly's change of heart, Bradley likely would have been hired in Philadelphia and not by the Jacksonville Jaguars. In fact, Reid called Bradley to talk to him about the Eagles job. "He called me and . . . just said, 'Hey, Gus, I know you're there, I just want to tell you Philadelphia is a great place, a great organization, an unbelievable opportunity,' " Bradley said Wednesday.
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