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Radiation

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NEWS
April 1, 1986 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has cited Abington Memorial Hospital for 10 "significant" violations of radiation-protection rules in its radiation- therapy and nuclear-medicine departments. According to hospital officials, all violations were corrected on Dec. 21, the day after the NRC conducted a surprise inspection. The hospital, on Old York Road in eastern Montgomery County's Abington Township, has 30 days from the NRC's March 24 ruling to pay a proposed $2,500 fine or begin a lengthy appeal process.
NEWS
June 11, 2011 | By Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press
TOKYO - Japan's nuclear safety officials reprimanded the operator of Japan's tsunami-damaged power plant Friday and demanded an investigation of how two workers were exposed to radiation more than twice the government-set limit. The government also ordered the utility to reduce workers' risks of heat-related illnesses as concerns grow about the health risks faced by the people toiling to get the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant under control. The two men with high radiation exposure worked at a central control room for two reactors when the tsunami struck March 11 and the days that followed.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | By SUSAN Q. STRANAHAN
Just as America's greatest storehouse of data on the health risks of radiation is about to be opened, finally allowing scientists to determine how little radiation causes adverse health effects, nuclear regulators and the industry they oversee are about to ensure that no American will ever know precisely how much radiation he or she is exposed to. They plan to remove one-third of the volume of low-level radioactive waste generated in this country...
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Robert Zausner contributed to this article
A four-year legal battle over the release of secret occupational health records of workers at the nation's nuclear weapons plants ended yesterday, when Philadelphia lawyers received a computer tape containing the occupational-health records of 44,000 workers at the Hanford nuclear reservation in Washington. "We've got it," said Daniel Berger, an attorney for the Three Mile Island Public Health Fund. "We received the first installment of the records we've been seeking for a long time.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By E.J. Brown, Special to The Inquirer
While most businesses believe big is better, a new Chester County health- care provider says the best medicine may come in small packages. The Exton Cancer Center, which opened three weeks ago in a medical suite at the Oaklands Corporate Center on Route 30, hopes to provide a full range of radiation and chemotherapy for its diagnosed cancer patients more conveniently and possibly at less cost than its hospital-based counterparts, even though it...
NEWS
August 8, 1988 | By Dominic Olivastro
As I write, a 2-year-old girl from Kiev is undergoing surgery at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The child was born five days after the Chernobyl accident, and it is widely believed that the tumor in her brain was caused by the release of radiation from the nuclear reactor. It has been reported that way on television, usually with the sheepish disclaimer that "physicians are not sure of the cause. " Radiation is quickly becoming the new national nightmare. In a curious way it has come to resemble the malignant spirits of the netherworld that once haunted the Middle Ages.
NEWS
January 3, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Charlton Heston says he is on the road to recovery after weeks of radiation to battle prostate cancer. "It's not totally gone, but it's on the path to it," the Academy Award-winning actor said Friday. Heston, 75, finished about seven weeks of radiation last month. The cancer was found during an annual checkup in June. Doctors agreed to let the actor, who is also president of the National Rifle Association, postpone radiation until after November's elections so he could campaign for Republican candidates and continue shooting the comedy Town and Country, his 75th movie.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By Robert Alvarez
In May of 1928, Marie Curie, the famous discoverer of radium, received a disturbing letter from an American journalist. After decades of handling radioactive materials without any protection, Madame Curie could not read the letter without assistance because she suffered from radiation-induced cataracts. The journalist's letter said that several young women in Essex, N.J., were dying from destruction of their jaw tissues after licking radium paint brushes in a factory that made luminescent watch dials.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Gloucester City residents with questions about recent state radiation surveys can meet with officials from the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) tonight. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. at the Gloucester Heights Fire Hall, 230 Nicholson Rd. The testing identified gamma radiation from radioactive wastes left by the Welsbach Co. in Gloucester City and the General Gas Mantle Co. in Camden. These industries used thorium, a radioactive material, in manufacturing mantles for lamps and lanterns 50 or more years ago. Testing of three sites in the city began in January.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Camden and Gloucester City residents who have questions about testing for possible radiation contamination in their neighborhoods can talk with state officials during a series of meetings beginning Monday. The state Department of Environmental Protection announced last week that several neighborhoods in the two cities may have been exposed to gamma radiation, which can cause cancer, from the residue of old factories in the area. Testing of the areas will begin in two weeks, the department said.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Radiation is a powerful cancer treatment, but protecting healthy tissue from the scatter of damaging rays is challenging. As a result, women who get radiation for cancer in their left breast - which overlaps the heart - have been found to be at increased risk of heart disease and lung cancer. A new study by Thomas Jefferson University researchers confirms that such women can significantly reduce the incidental radiation dose to their hearts with a simple technique: holding their breath.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most U.S. women who opt for lumpectomy and radiation to treat early-stage breast cancer get irradiated for twice as many weeks as necessary, adding to the cost and inconvenience of the therapy, according to a University of Pennsylvania analysis. High-qual-ity studies have shown that just three weeks of a newer, higher-dose type of radiation are as safe and effective as six to seven weeks of conventional radiation. In 2011, radiation oncology guidelines endorsed the shorter course of "hypofractionated" therapy for lumpectomy patients over age 50. Yet only about a third of such women got it in 2013 - up from about 11 percent in 2008, the researchers found using insurance claims from health plans covering 9 million women.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Debra Copit, Generosa Grana, and Marisa Weiss have much in common: all mothers, all Main Line residents, all doctors - all breast cancer specialists. And they all have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Their similar stories are both coincidence and cautionary tale - illustrations of breast cancer's indiscriminate nature but also its complexity, storming into the lives of patients with individual and unique markers. Yet at least in one way, cancer has imparted a shared lesson to these women, all of whom are now in excellent health: Getting a diagnosis will change your life.
NEWS
October 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than a decade after prostate cancer became the economic driver behind proton beam therapy in the U.S., it still isn't clear that men treated with the technology do better than those who get less costly radiation treatments. That's why expert groups have recently advised against insurance coverage of proton therapy for prostate cancer - and why some private plans are refusing to pay for it. The Catch-22 is that this pullback is hampering a clinical trial co-led by the University of Pennsylvania that would finally settle the question of superiority.
NEWS
August 11, 2014 | By Art Carey, For The Inquirer
Sam Rennix could be forgiven for assuming that the worst was behind him after triple-bypass surgery in 2010. Then, last summer, his throat became sore, like something was stuck in it. Unlike many men, Rennix, who lives in Springfield, Delaware County, and is manager of Wolfe Pool Supply in Narberth, doesn't hesitate to see a doctor when something's amiss with his health. Perhaps it's because he's married to an intensive-care nurse and knows all too well that procrastinating can turn a curable problem into a death sentence.
NEWS
December 5, 2013 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of a University of Pennsylvania neuroscientist who died of brain cancer sued the university Tuesday, alleging that the school bore responsibility for his death by failing to protect him from laboratory radiation. The family of Jeffrey H. Ware further alleged that Penn physicians enrolled him in a study without proper consent, treating his gliosarcoma with still more radiation, thereby subjecting him to painful side effects long after there was any hope of recovery. Ware, who died in October 2011 at age 47, lived in Haddonfield.
NEWS
October 17, 2013 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Patients enduring the excruciating pain of cancer that has spread to the bones are often given multiple doses of radiation. There is strong evidence, however, that one dose controls pain as effectively as 10 or more. In addition, one treatment is cheaper and far more convenient for patients who already have plenty on their minds. Yet a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers has found that only 3.3 percent of Medicare patients receiving radiation for prostate cancer that had metastasized to the bone received a "single-fraction" treatment.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
Imagine Radiohead without the self-importance, and . . . well, that's more or less impossible. But it's one way to approach the music of Atoms for Peace, which teams Radiohead front man Thom Yorke and producer Nigel Godrich with Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea and percussionist Mauro Refosco. Drummer Joey Waronker, most regularly of R.E.M., rounds out the quintet. Yorke and Godrich started Tuesday's show at the Liacouras Center with guitars at the ready, picking out the clipped rhythms of "Before Your Very Eyes . . . ". But stagehands soon took the guitars away, and Godrich retired to a bank of keyboards - musical and computer - while Yorke concentrated on his dance moves.
NEWS
September 8, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
In very rare cases, using radiation to kill the primary tumor of a patient with metastatic cancer leads to the disappearance of tumors throughout the body. Scientists can't explain this amazing collateral effect, but it seems to activate an antitumor immune response. Mohan Doss, a medical physicist at Fox Chase Cancer Center, believes the distant tumors melt away because of incidental low-dose rays emanating from the high-dose therapy. And that bolsters a theory he has researched for years: radiation at or slightly above natural background levels can stimulate the body's disease-fighting defenses.
NEWS
July 28, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Like her patients at the University of Pennsylvania, radiation oncologist Neha Vapiwala applauded the recent approval of a new drug for men with late-stage prostate cancer that has spread to their bones. But Vapiwala was also excited by the big picture. The debut of Bayer Pharmaceuticals' Xofigo, a form of radium, is a legacy of the work of Marie and Pierre Curie, who isolated the element from uranium 115 years ago. The novel drug opens the door to a new class of radiation-emitting therapies with "great potential" to treat other cancers, and perhaps nonmalignant conditions that affect bones, Vapiwala said.
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