CollectionsRadiation
IN THE NEWS

Radiation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 1, 1986 | By Ginny Wiegand, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has cited Abington Memorial Hospital for 10 "significant" violations of radiation-protection rules in its radiation- therapy and nuclear-medicine departments. According to hospital officials, all violations were corrected on Dec. 21, the day after the NRC conducted a surprise inspection. The hospital, on Old York Road in eastern Montgomery County's Abington Township, has 30 days from the NRC's March 24 ruling to pay a proposed $2,500 fine or begin a lengthy appeal process.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | By SUSAN Q. STRANAHAN
Just as America's greatest storehouse of data on the health risks of radiation is about to be opened, finally allowing scientists to determine how little radiation causes adverse health effects, nuclear regulators and the industry they oversee are about to ensure that no American will ever know precisely how much radiation he or she is exposed to. They plan to remove one-third of the volume of low-level radioactive waste generated in this country...
NEWS
July 19, 1990 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer staff writer Robert Zausner contributed to this article
A four-year legal battle over the release of secret occupational health records of workers at the nation's nuclear weapons plants ended yesterday, when Philadelphia lawyers received a computer tape containing the occupational-health records of 44,000 workers at the Hanford nuclear reservation in Washington. "We've got it," said Daniel Berger, an attorney for the Three Mile Island Public Health Fund. "We received the first installment of the records we've been seeking for a long time.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By E.J. Brown, Special to The Inquirer
While most businesses believe big is better, a new Chester County health- care provider says the best medicine may come in small packages. The Exton Cancer Center, which opened three weeks ago in a medical suite at the Oaklands Corporate Center on Route 30, hopes to provide a full range of radiation and chemotherapy for its diagnosed cancer patients more conveniently and possibly at less cost than its hospital-based counterparts, even though it...
NEWS
August 8, 1988 | By Dominic Olivastro
As I write, a 2-year-old girl from Kiev is undergoing surgery at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The child was born five days after the Chernobyl accident, and it is widely believed that the tumor in her brain was caused by the release of radiation from the nuclear reactor. It has been reported that way on television, usually with the sheepish disclaimer that "physicians are not sure of the cause. " Radiation is quickly becoming the new national nightmare. In a curious way it has come to resemble the malignant spirits of the netherworld that once haunted the Middle Ages.
NEWS
January 3, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Charlton Heston says he is on the road to recovery after weeks of radiation to battle prostate cancer. "It's not totally gone, but it's on the path to it," the Academy Award-winning actor said Friday. Heston, 75, finished about seven weeks of radiation last month. The cancer was found during an annual checkup in June. Doctors agreed to let the actor, who is also president of the National Rifle Association, postpone radiation until after November's elections so he could campaign for Republican candidates and continue shooting the comedy Town and Country, his 75th movie.
NEWS
January 15, 1986 | By Robert Alvarez
In May of 1928, Marie Curie, the famous discoverer of radium, received a disturbing letter from an American journalist. After decades of handling radioactive materials without any protection, Madame Curie could not read the letter without assistance because she suffered from radiation-induced cataracts. The journalist's letter said that several young women in Essex, N.J., were dying from destruction of their jaw tissues after licking radium paint brushes in a factory that made luminescent watch dials.
NEWS
June 11, 2011 | By Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press
TOKYO - Japan's nuclear safety officials reprimanded the operator of Japan's tsunami-damaged power plant Friday and demanded an investigation of how two workers were exposed to radiation more than twice the government-set limit. The government also ordered the utility to reduce workers' risks of heat-related illnesses as concerns grow about the health risks faced by the people toiling to get the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant under control. The two men with high radiation exposure worked at a central control room for two reactors when the tsunami struck March 11 and the days that followed.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Gloucester City residents with questions about recent state radiation surveys can meet with officials from the state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) tonight. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. at the Gloucester Heights Fire Hall, 230 Nicholson Rd. The testing identified gamma radiation from radioactive wastes left by the Welsbach Co. in Gloucester City and the General Gas Mantle Co. in Camden. These industries used thorium, a radioactive material, in manufacturing mantles for lamps and lanterns 50 or more years ago. Testing of three sites in the city began in January.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Camden and Gloucester City residents who have questions about testing for possible radiation contamination in their neighborhoods can talk with state officials during a series of meetings beginning Monday. The state Department of Environmental Protection announced last week that several neighborhoods in the two cities may have been exposed to gamma radiation, which can cause cancer, from the residue of old factories in the area. Testing of the areas will begin in two weeks, the department said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 29, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
A pair of Villanova University astronomers had spent years studying the radiation emitted by red dwarfs - a type of star that includes the sun's nearest neighbor, Proxima Centauri. Then, two months ago, they were let in on a big secret. After studying a pattern of "wobbles" in the light from Proxima Centauri, an international team of scientists concluded the phenomenon was caused by a previously unknown planet. Could the Villanova scientists help determine if water might exist on its surface?
NEWS
June 10, 2016 | Gar Joseph
GLIOBLASTOMA is brain cancer. Radiation and chemotherapy fight it. Darren Daulton beat it! Blah, blah, blah. The doctors at Jefferson - oncologists, glioblastomists, radiation shooters - are nothing but sunshine. I am a journalist. Sunshine is boring. "I understand how most patients view a fatal illness," I told my medical group. "But bad news doesn't bother me. In fact, the more detail you give me - bad and worse - the happier I will be. " Happier on the story. Not on my mortality.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Where most radiologists look at an ultrasound and see a bladder indented by a very large prostate gland, Sue Summerton saw the Liberty Bell. What to most might appear as a gallbladder with a couple gallstones were, to Summerton, the face and mile-high hair of Marge Simpson. That bicornuate uterus? The letter "Y. " What's a doctor to do? Summerton turned her unusual point of view into a business, Xray Artistry, reveling more, she says, in the laughs her work elicits than the revenue it generates.
NEWS
March 14, 2016 | Alfred Lubrano
I was diagnosed with Stage 4 head-and-neck cancer three days before my wedding last July. If you're wondering which emotion - dread or joy - wins out in a schizophrenic standoff like that, you've never planned a backyard reception with caterers, florists, and 30 guests all scheduled to swoop in before 6 p.m. What happens is, you say, "I do," then kiss the bride. You lock yourself in the bathroom and scream on your own time. With the discovery of a lump in my neck, I'd emigrated to a different country - Cancer-stan, crowded with around 20 million Americans.
NEWS
January 31, 2016
Three experts from Fox Chase Cancer Center's Department of Radiation Oncology answer frequently asked questions about radiation therapy. Q: What is the goal of radiation therapy with respect to treating cancer? A: For most patients, the goal is to get rid of the cancer completely and, hopefully, prevent it from returning. But for those whose cancer has spread, radiation may be used palliatively, to make symptoms better and improve quality of life, knowing that we likely will not cure the cancer.
NEWS
January 27, 2016 | BY DAN GERINGER, Staff Writer
TERI GILBERT of Northeast Philadelphia is openly defying the Police Department's "no savesies" ban on reserving shoveled-out parking spots in the wake of the weekend blizzard. Gilbert is six months pregnant, so her husband, Mike, who is undergoing radiation treatment for Stage 4 metastatic throat and neck cancer, shoveled out a space in front of their Rhawnhurst house while son Matthew, 23 months, watched from an upstairs window. Then Teri taped a handwritten savesies sign to an orange cone that reads: "This spot was shoveled by a cancer patient for himself and his pregnant wife.
NEWS
December 14, 2015 | By Sandy Bauers, For The Inquirer
When Robert L. Brent was still in grade school, he told his mother he wanted to be a physician. But, he told her, he didn't have to charge his patients any money. His mother told him that was kind of him, but not very practical. "Actually," he said recently, "my dream came true. " Brent, who began his career in the early days of the Atomic Age, became a world-renowned expert on the effects of radiation on the human embryo. He found that birth defects, mental retardation, and miscarriage do not result from the amount of radiation received in most diagnostic tests.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Radiation is a powerful cancer treatment, but protecting healthy tissue from the scatter of damaging rays is challenging. As a result, women who get radiation for cancer in their left breast - which overlaps the heart - have been found to be at increased risk of heart disease and lung cancer. A new study by Thomas Jefferson University researchers confirms that such women can significantly reduce the incidental radiation dose to their hearts with a simple technique: holding their breath.
NEWS
December 21, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most U.S. women who opt for lumpectomy and radiation to treat early-stage breast cancer get irradiated for twice as many weeks as necessary, adding to the cost and inconvenience of the therapy, according to a University of Pennsylvania analysis. High-qual-ity studies have shown that just three weeks of a newer, higher-dose type of radiation are as safe and effective as six to seven weeks of conventional radiation. In 2011, radiation oncology guidelines endorsed the shorter course of "hypofractionated" therapy for lumpectomy patients over age 50. Yet only about a third of such women got it in 2013 - up from about 11 percent in 2008, the researchers found using insurance claims from health plans covering 9 million women.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2014 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Debra Copit, Generosa Grana, and Marisa Weiss have much in common: all mothers, all Main Line residents, all doctors - all breast cancer specialists. And they all have been diagnosed with breast cancer. Their similar stories are both coincidence and cautionary tale - illustrations of breast cancer's indiscriminate nature but also its complexity, storming into the lives of patients with individual and unique markers. Yet at least in one way, cancer has imparted a shared lesson to these women, all of whom are now in excellent health: Getting a diagnosis will change your life.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|