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NEWS
July 1, 2005 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was hailed as an icon of Philadelphia's black community, a groundbreaking radio personality, and an impresario who brought the nation's best rhythm-and-blues artists to the landmark Uptown Theater, and a champion of racial equality and social justice. At a church on a street named for Cecil B. Moore, a civil-rights leader with whom he often collaborated, Georgie Woods was remembered yesterday by about 2,500 people who attended his funeral as, above all else, his radio handle: "The Guy with the Goods.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2006 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
PATTY BALBO, Bob Dewald, Denise Nejame and the Native American Blue Eagle may not be household names in any households but their own, but chances are they are the singers who've been heard most on Philadelphia radio. After all, did the Beatles, Elvis, Bobby Rydell or even the Delfonics sing those wondrous lyrics, "KYW. Newsradio. Ten-Sixty"? At least three times an hour - at the top and the 15s on either end - many news radio faithful probably even join in with the quartet of Philadelphia studio singers.
NEWS
December 18, 2007 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anchorwoman Alycia Lane's future with KYW (CBS3) is uncertain after her arrest early Sunday on charges of slugging a plainclothes New York City police officer. The station announced that Lane, 35, would begin a planned two-week, end-of-year vacation a week early, effective yesterday. Her name and image were stripped from station promos, and her work on the station's holiday special, airing tonight, was edited out. Observers say her return to her $700,000-a-year anchor job hinges not only on her legal case - a felony charge of second-degree assault that could take months to resolve - but the court of public opinion.
NEWS
July 29, 2008 | By CHRIS GIBBONS
The world is a bad place, a bad place, / A terrible place to live, oh, but I don't wanna die. / All my sorrows, sad tomorrows, take me back, to my old home. - "Reflections of My Life" by the Marmalade IT WAS JUST a little green radio with a big clear-plastic tuning dial. In the late 1960s, my big brother Mike found a small piece of wood paneling and used it as a shelf for the green radio, on the wall above his bunk bed. There were four of us in that room, and every night we would fall asleep with the radio on. We'd listen to WFIL and WIBG ("Wibbage" as we called it)
NEWS
February 6, 2004
SO FCC chief Michael Powell has decided to do something about the Super Bowl halftime entertainment. The only thing Janet Jackson is going to do is plead her case that she's innocent. Janet, you're not Penny on "Good Times" - you're an adult. Act like it. But there's never a cry when a radio jock (Howard Stern or Wendy Williams) uses language like b----, n----- and a-- to describe and demean individuals. Can somebody please tell me when b---- became socially acceptable? You have broadcasters who protect their interests by hiding behind the First Amendment and put the blame on "parents not monitoring what their kids listen to. " Mr. Powell: Take the rose-colored glasses off and use a Q-Tip to remove the wax. Maybe you'll hear something offensive.
NEWS
September 11, 2009
A RECENT column ("Pay for Play," Aug. 25) treated readers to a generous amount of record-label spin regarding legislation in Washington that would require local radio stations to pay an additional licensing fee - a performance tax - for every song aired free to listeners. While characterizing the debate as one between stations and musicians, you glossed over the fact that the group bankrolling this campaign is none other than the Recording Industry Association of America, which represents the four largest record labels in the world.
NEWS
April 14, 2009 | By Chris Plutte
Since arriving in Rwanda six months ago, I have learned a lot about the power of radio. On a recent Wednesday, I looked up from my Facebook page to watch six teenage girls leave my office in Kigali. They were off to the local radio station to produce Urungano (the local word for generation), a program addressing the trials and tribulations of Rwandan girls. The girls typically begin their program with a teenage chat and then work their way into discussions of such issues as underage marriage and child labor - both real problems in Rwanda.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
LET'S FACE it, when you think of a game-show host "type," local sports-gabber Mike Missanelli doesn't spring immediately to mind. Historically speaking, the most successful TV-game emcees have been genial to the point of unctuousness - walking, schmoozing embodiments of the phrase "warm and fuzzy. " Mikey Miss, on the other hand, has made headlines with public explosions of anger. If you call him on his daily 3-to-7 p.m. radio show on 97.5 The Fanatic and say something that he disagrees with, he's likely to question your sanity, intelligence and reason for living.
NEWS
March 29, 1993 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
What's in a Z? There are dozens of stations across the country that identify themselves with the letter Z plus a frequency number. Such a statio ID is considered easy to hear and recall, especially critical when listeners fill out radio ratings diaries. (The letter Q with a frequency number is also judged a memorable combination, as are the words "Power," "Magic" and "Kiss" plus a dial number.) Still, WHTZ-FM in New York is now claiming exclusive regional rights to its identification as "Z-100," and demanding that Philadelphia's newly turned contemporary-hits format WKSZ-FM stop identifying itself the same way. WHTZ has issued a threatening "cease and desist" letter to our Z-100, which up to a couple of weeks ago went by "Kiss 100" and played easy listening.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Florence Steck, 75, of Havertown, a performer, director and producer who helped shape programming in the early days of radio and television, died Monday at Delaware County Memorial Hospital. She was the widow of another radio and TV pioneer, Jack Steck, who died this year. The day she died would have been their 35th wedding anniversary. Mrs. Steck went to work in radio in 1938 as a secretary and singer on WPEN. At the time, there were few women in radio, but Mrs. Steck - whose maiden name was Florence Bendon and who sang under the name Carol Wynne - worked her way into a staff position as a production assistant.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 26, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - After a 2008 train collision killed 25 people in California, Congress mandated new safety measures to prevent more high-speed disasters. But the goal was met with an invisible obstacle: radio spectrum. Licenses to the airwaves - used for everything from TV to police scanners to space exploration - are critical to the new system, Positive Train Control. But Amtrak and most other passenger rail agencies floundered for years while trying to acquire those licenses, leaving them short of the bandwidth needed to use the new safety systems.
NEWS
May 21, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - On April 15, less than a month before eight people were killed in last week's train derailment in Philadelphia, Amtrak closed on a deal to acquire the radio spectrum it needs to upgrade its rail safety system throughout the Northeast Corridor, according to Amtrak and the Federal Communications Commission. Had it been in place, the system, Positive Train Control, could have slowed or stopped the speeding Amtrak Train 188 and prevented the crash, a National Transportation Safety Board member has said.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2015 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Columnist
Tom and Paul Kelly still work in commercial radio, polling listeners and advising such stations as More FM Philadelphia on what music to play. Big Daddy Graham is still happy holding down the overnight schmooze slot at Sportsradio 94WIP. But for more pleasure and maybe their future, these guys are banking on Internet radio - the Kelly brothers are co-operators (with third partner, Al Clay) of the Havertown streaming service iRadioPhilly. And Graham is weekly host of a music party on Wildfire Radio, a streaming Internet radio operation based in Collingswood.
NEWS
May 13, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The crowd at radio 104.5 FM's sold-out eighth annual "Birthday Show" at the Susquehanna Center on Sunday was decidedly young. On this Mother's Day, it seemed that many local young adults care more for music than for Mom. Then again, this concert line-up was something mothers could love. Despite a few dark souls, the schedule that showed the happy face of post-post-post-post-punk. I even thought I heard some nonspecific-insignia-T-shirt-wearing moms - more of them, actually, than the nonspecific insignia-T-shirt-wearing kids - cheering Irish singer Hozier.
NEWS
April 12, 2015 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the fall, Camden officials installed a chain-link fence around the perimeter of the vacant Radio Lofts building in the city's downtown. The measure was intended to secure the aging structure from trespassers, as well as protect passersby from bricks and other falling debris, but it was also a tacit acknowledgment that the long-delayed plan to develop the property was nowhere close to getting started. The 10-story Cooper Street landmark formerly known as RCA Building No. 8 has long been seen as a next step toward revitalizing Camden's downtown.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Jenny DeHuff
A QUEEN has lost her crown. NBC10 has confirmed that reporter Nefertiti Jaquez is no longer with the station. A spokesman declined to reveal the reason, citing a "no comment" policy on personnel matters, but several sources say that Jaquez's departure was connected to her reporting on slain Philadelphia Police Officer Robert Wilson III last Thursday night. According to TVSpy, Jaquez, at 5:34 p.m. last Thursday, reported live from Temple University Hospital that she had solid information that the officer was dead.
NEWS
February 17, 2015
ON AIR, OFF AIR, Josh Innes loves to talk. About his love of radio. Life in Philly. And the '80s sitcom "Coach," which he owns on DVD. Either way, it's the same guy. "Me on the radio is me here right now, and that's what I take pride in," Innes, 28, said yesterday afternoon, sitting at a bar table at Kildare's Irish Pub in Manayunk. "Obviously, when you're on the radio, you kind of ham it up a little bit. I have to say it in a way to get people responding, but every opinion I have on the radio is an opinion of mine," he said.
NEWS
February 12, 2015 | By Sarai Flores and Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writers
Stephen Timothy Roll, 61, of Bala Cynwyd, an executive at WHYY for more than two decades, died Friday, Feb. 6, of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Known as Tim, Mr. Roll had a long career in the Philadelphia radio and TV industry. He was a manager of corporate underwriting at WHYY, where he worked for 24 years. In his role with WHYY, Mr. Roll sold advertising spots to corporate and nonprofit clients across all platforms - radio, TV and on www.whyy.org . Before that, Mr. Roll worked in radio advertising sales for WCAU-AM, KYW-AM, and WMGK-FM.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | By Molly Eichel
J OHN BOLARIS is back on the regular broadcast beat for the first time since he was fired from Fox 29 in 2012, but this time he's radio-bound. Bolaris will host "CenterStage with John Bolaris," on WTEL (610-AM) (WIP's former signal) from 6 to 7 p.m. Saturdays, starting this week. His first guests include Mayor Nutter and "Mob Wives" star Natalie Didonato . "I'm just going to be honest and real, nothing phony," Bolaris said. Bolaris told me that "CenterStage" will interview celebs both local and national, trying to get to the person underneath the status.
NEWS
January 9, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugene J. Giello, 67, of Drexel Hill, a sports radio talk-show host, died Sunday, Jan. 4, of heart failure at Roxborough Memorial Hospital. Mr. Giello, known as "Gene," was the Bucks County-based producer and host of Sports Chatter Guys: Where Your Opinion Really Does Matter! The show was broadcast on WBCB (1490 AM), ESPN (950 AM), and WWDB (860 AM). It aired live Sundays between 4:30 and 6:30 p.m. from Chickie's & Pete's Crab House & Sports Bar in South Philadelphia. Cohosts were Paul J. Solari and Kevin Midgette.
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