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NEWS
July 1, 2005 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
He was hailed as an icon of Philadelphia's black community, a groundbreaking radio personality, and an impresario who brought the nation's best rhythm-and-blues artists to the landmark Uptown Theater, and a champion of racial equality and social justice. At a church on a street named for Cecil B. Moore, a civil-rights leader with whom he often collaborated, Georgie Woods was remembered yesterday by about 2,500 people who attended his funeral as, above all else, his radio handle: "The Guy with the Goods.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2006 | By ROBERT STRAUSS For the Daily News
PATTY BALBO, Bob Dewald, Denise Nejame and the Native American Blue Eagle may not be household names in any households but their own, but chances are they are the singers who've been heard most on Philadelphia radio. After all, did the Beatles, Elvis, Bobby Rydell or even the Delfonics sing those wondrous lyrics, "KYW. Newsradio. Ten-Sixty"? At least three times an hour - at the top and the 15s on either end - many news radio faithful probably even join in with the quartet of Philadelphia studio singers.
NEWS
December 18, 2007 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Anchorwoman Alycia Lane's future with KYW (CBS3) is uncertain after her arrest early Sunday on charges of slugging a plainclothes New York City police officer. The station announced that Lane, 35, would begin a planned two-week, end-of-year vacation a week early, effective yesterday. Her name and image were stripped from station promos, and her work on the station's holiday special, airing tonight, was edited out. Observers say her return to her $700,000-a-year anchor job hinges not only on her legal case - a felony charge of second-degree assault that could take months to resolve - but the court of public opinion.
NEWS
July 29, 2008 | By CHRIS GIBBONS
The world is a bad place, a bad place, / A terrible place to live, oh, but I don't wanna die. / All my sorrows, sad tomorrows, take me back, to my old home. - "Reflections of My Life" by the Marmalade IT WAS JUST a little green radio with a big clear-plastic tuning dial. In the late 1960s, my big brother Mike found a small piece of wood paneling and used it as a shelf for the green radio, on the wall above his bunk bed. There were four of us in that room, and every night we would fall asleep with the radio on. We'd listen to WFIL and WIBG ("Wibbage" as we called it)
NEWS
February 6, 2004
SO FCC chief Michael Powell has decided to do something about the Super Bowl halftime entertainment. The only thing Janet Jackson is going to do is plead her case that she's innocent. Janet, you're not Penny on "Good Times" - you're an adult. Act like it. But there's never a cry when a radio jock (Howard Stern or Wendy Williams) uses language like b----, n----- and a-- to describe and demean individuals. Can somebody please tell me when b---- became socially acceptable? You have broadcasters who protect their interests by hiding behind the First Amendment and put the blame on "parents not monitoring what their kids listen to. " Mr. Powell: Take the rose-colored glasses off and use a Q-Tip to remove the wax. Maybe you'll hear something offensive.
NEWS
September 11, 2009
A RECENT column ("Pay for Play," Aug. 25) treated readers to a generous amount of record-label spin regarding legislation in Washington that would require local radio stations to pay an additional licensing fee - a performance tax - for every song aired free to listeners. While characterizing the debate as one between stations and musicians, you glossed over the fact that the group bankrolling this campaign is none other than the Recording Industry Association of America, which represents the four largest record labels in the world.
NEWS
April 14, 2009 | By Chris Plutte
Since arriving in Rwanda six months ago, I have learned a lot about the power of radio. On a recent Wednesday, I looked up from my Facebook page to watch six teenage girls leave my office in Kigali. They were off to the local radio station to produce Urungano (the local word for generation), a program addressing the trials and tribulations of Rwandan girls. The girls typically begin their program with a teenage chat and then work their way into discussions of such issues as underage marriage and child labor - both real problems in Rwanda.
NEWS
March 29, 1993 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
What's in a Z? There are dozens of stations across the country that identify themselves with the letter Z plus a frequency number. Such a statio ID is considered easy to hear and recall, especially critical when listeners fill out radio ratings diaries. (The letter Q with a frequency number is also judged a memorable combination, as are the words "Power," "Magic" and "Kiss" plus a dial number.) Still, WHTZ-FM in New York is now claiming exclusive regional rights to its identification as "Z-100," and demanding that Philadelphia's newly turned contemporary-hits format WKSZ-FM stop identifying itself the same way. WHTZ has issued a threatening "cease and desist" letter to our Z-100, which up to a couple of weeks ago went by "Kiss 100" and played easy listening.
NEWS
November 16, 1994 | By Andy Wallace, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Florence Steck, 75, of Havertown, a performer, director and producer who helped shape programming in the early days of radio and television, died Monday at Delaware County Memorial Hospital. She was the widow of another radio and TV pioneer, Jack Steck, who died this year. The day she died would have been their 35th wedding anniversary. Mrs. Steck went to work in radio in 1938 as a secretary and singer on WPEN. At the time, there were few women in radio, but Mrs. Steck - whose maiden name was Florence Bendon and who sang under the name Carol Wynne - worked her way into a staff position as a production assistant.
NEWS
August 31, 1987 | By JOE O'DOWD Jr., Daily News Staff Writer
Robert Goulet has been a fixture on the nightclub scene for more than 20 years, known by the title "Mr. Las Vegas. " Not only does Goulet perform in this glitziest of towns, he even lives there. The mellow voice, swaggering gait and bedroom eyes make him a big favorite with audiences. Although he hasn't had a hit record for some time, Goulet still sells out his performances. Larry King talks with Goulet at midnight on WIP (610/AM). Before the advent of television, millions of people were entertained by radio, whose programs were followed just as religously as today's TV soap operas.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Changes coming to 'Radio Times' The WHYY show Radio Times tweeted on Thursday: "Exciting changes coming to @whyyradiotimes. Starting next week, Marty will only do the interview for Hour 1. Marty Moss-Coane , celebrating 25 years this year as host of the show, announced on the air that the second hour will be hosted by anchor/reporter Mary Cummings-Jordan . Lost Boys recall Williams Some of the younger castmates of Robin Williams...
NEWS
August 10, 2016 | By Jeff Gammage, Staff Writer
It's not pirate radio. But then again, it's not too far from a parrot and an eye patch. Ideas for programming include shows on geek culture, salsa music, and legalizing marijuana, along with poetry slams, local bands, and news from the neighborhoods. Some shows might be broadcast in Khmer or Bhutanese. Philadelphia's new radio station, low-power, public-access WPPM - as in "People Powered Media" - is inventing itself in a hurry. It's set to go live with all original programs next month, charged with serving the underserved and providing unique and educational points of view and information.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
When her husband died, life began all over again for Birtan Aka Collier. A former banker and mayoral adviser, she had been married 30 years to Ralph Collier, a sophisticated voice in local radio who interviewed celebrities and newsworthy figures. He worked for seven decades in radio, wrote a weekly travel column for the Main Line Times , and hosted a travel program for listeners until he died in 2013. That's when she stepped up to the microphone: She took over her husband's interviews and began recording the shows.
NEWS
July 2, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Gov. Christie on Thursday shot back at a conservative New Jersey radio host critical of his new tax plan, accusing the host of deliberately misleading listeners to "try to make yourself famous" and boost ratings. The host, Bill Spadea of New Jersey 101.5's morning show, snapped back, "Governor, it's not any more about ratings for me than it is about a nice tax-cutting headline for you. " At issue is Christie's plan to raise the state's 14.5-cent-per-gallon tax on gasoline to 37.5 cents as part of legislation to replenish New Jersey's fund for the construction and maintenance of roads, bridges, and rail lines.
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
EWING, N.J. - For a good three hours Tuesday morning, the conservative radio host was filling the airwaves with invective against the proposed gas-tax hike, ripping into a deal brokered in the "middle of the night" by Gov. Christie and Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto. Then, during a commercial break from Bill Spadea's four-hour morning show on New Jersey 101.5 FM came some interesting news: The governor had reached out to the station's news director. "That was the first time in six years Christie has ever called me to say, 'What should I do about this?
NEWS
July 1, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
The topic was "voter anger" in the 2016 presidential election, but columnist and TV and radio host Michael Smerconish suggested that many Americans are not seething with discontent. "If there's a new silent majority in the nation, it's not tea-party activists, it's not millennials who are feeling the Bern, it's the tens of millions of Americans who are not angry but too complacent," he said. Smerconish was the featured speaker Wednesday at an event hosted by Philadelphia Media Network, parent company of the Inquirer, the Daily News, and Philly.com, at the Independence Visitor Center.
NEWS
June 13, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
The tech-loving kid who grew up to be president of the South Jersey Radio Association was just 14 when he first messaged the universe. "I said something like, 'My name is Ken. My location is Clementon, New Jersey,' " Ken Botterbrodt recalls. "I was in the basement with an 18-watt transmitter I built from parts of TV sets. I sent a signal out, and somebody - a guy in Michigan - came back. "It was magical. " As Botterbrodt and other association members mark the centennial of the oldest continuously operating club of its kind in North America (sjra.org)
NEWS
June 9, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
TUESDAY, AL CAPONE was not the most celebrated name in Eastern State Penitentiary. It was Joey Warchal. About a week ago, I told you how Joey, a precocious 13-year-old from Somerton, discovered what he called an "historically inaccurate" radio in the cell of Capone, likely the prison's most famous inmate, during a school tour. The Chicago gangster was incarcerated in 1929 and 1930, but Joey, who is an antiques collector specializing in radios and record players, noticed the floor-model wooden radio in the plush cell was manufactured in 1942.
NEWS
June 1, 2016 | By Stu Bykofsky
AT A glance, Joey Warchal knew something was very wrong. He loved everything he saw during a tour of Eastern State Penitentiary - Al Capone's cell most of all, but something was very wrong. A tour guide said the Prohibition-era gangster was incarcerated in 1929 and 1930. "The radio featured in the display is historically inaccurate," Warchal politely emailed Eastern State Penitentiary senior vice president Sean Kelley after his tour. "As an antique collector specializing in radios," Warchal said "the radio displayed is a Philco A-361, made in January 1942," after Capone had departed Eastern State.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
If anyone doubts how trendy podcasting has become, note the recent Season Five finale of HBO's Girls . While Lena Dunham's character, Hannah, waits in line for her slot at a storyteller's event, another monologuist tells her, "I have a podcast - I care," to prove both his universal concern and utter hipness. During its decade of existence, podcasting has gone from rudimentary, nerdy chatterboxing and being an arm of public broadcasting to gorgeously produced, often live, geek culture audiobooks.
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