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Radio Equipment

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NEWS
March 20, 1995 | by Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
When the pop history of Philadelphia is written, Grady and Hurst should get a very long chapter. It seems like they've been around since Marconi invented the radio. Their longevity, popularity and recognizability in Philadelphia is unmatched. Joe Grady, 76, who began a radio career in 1935 and Ed Hurst, 67, who was on the air as a teen-ager, are genuine pioneers. They invented the teen dance show format when Dick Clark was in knickers. In fact, the duo got first crack at hosting "Bandstand," but had to turn down the opportunity because they were tied to radio contracts.
NEWS
March 1, 1988 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
A Republican budget analyst raised questions yesterday about a state police contract for radio equipment that he said cost twice as much as similar equipment purchased by the Transportation Department. During a House Appropriations Committee hearing, budget analyst Michael Rosenstein suggested that the cost of the state police's no-bid, $4.2 million contract with Motorola Corp. was excessive compared with contracts put out on bid. The absence of bidding, he said, eliminated discounts.
NEWS
June 6, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Police departments and fire and ambulance companies throughout Bucks County will spend a total of about $8 million this summer to buy radio equipment that works with the new digital countywide dispatch system, communication officials said last week. Despite the price tag of almost $3,000 for each hand-held and in-vehicle radio, police chiefs around the county say the new system is worth the cost. Problems with aging equipment and with areas where the old analog system simply wouldn't work are strong arguments for new equipment, said Brent Wiggins, the county's director of communications.
NEWS
April 12, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
The Springfield Commissioners have approved the borrowing of $400,000 to update the 20-year-old Springfield Township police radio system. The loan will be used to replace all patrol car and base station radio equipment and to renovate the police radio room, according to township manager Michael LeFevre. It was approved during a special township meeting Tuesday. "There were frequent problems with breakdowns resulting in an almost at- risk situation to an officer should he need backup," said LeFevre.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | By Nancy Reuter, Special to The Inquirer
The ninth annual Hamfest sponsored by the Gloucester County Amateur Radio Club in Mullica Hill will be next Sunday and will feature testing for amateur radio licenses and the sale of new and used radio equipment ranging from nuts and bolts to satellite dishes. Hamfest chairman Harry Spiece said there were about one million amateur radio operators in the United States and that many outside the country. Amateur or "ham" radio operators use radio equipment to speak to other radio operators around the world.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Federal officials yesterday seized the radio equipment of a Norristown man they say is the rogue ham operator who harassed police and firefighters over the airwaves, interrupting their calls and cursing them. Officials of the Federal Communications Commission went to the second-floor apartment of Ernest Woods Jr., in the 500 block of Stanbridge Street, about 10 a.m. and seized two pieces of radio equipment. Wood, who officials say has broadcast insults over police and firefighter frequencies since September, has not been charged with any crime.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | By Larry Parker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Burlington County freeholder board gave preliminary approval yesterday to three bond ordinances totaling almost $4 million to fund several initiatives to upgrade the county's technology for the 21st century. A $1.8 million bond ordinance for county equipment will include $250,000 to install a closed-circuit video network between the county's Minimum Security Facility and Juvenile Detention Center, both in Pemberton Township, and the courthouse in Mount Holly. Retiring Sheriff Edward Cummings long campaigned for such a measure, to keep officers from having to escort prisoners between the jails and Mount Holly for court appearances.
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It's budget time for Chester County municipalities, and many are facing sticker shock over the costs of radio equipment needed to meet the high-tech standards of the county's new communications system. For one 800 megaherz (MHz) mobile radio: $2,250. For a portable radio with accessories: $2,400. For an 800 MHz control station: $5,000. In other words, for a municipality with just one police officer and one patrol car, it will cost more than $10,000 to bring that small department up to speed.
NEWS
April 1, 1993 | By Kathi Kauffman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Before getting married, Lee Robinson had to get permission from her senior officer to wear her wedding gown. "My trousseau was my uniform," she said. Robinson, a World War II veteran now living in Havertown, was one of the first of the lady leathernecks, women Marines. And the corps was adamant. Marines were not to appear in public out of uniform. About 10 members of the Greater Philadelphia Chapter of the Women Marines, all World War II veterans, gathered Saturday at Williamson's Restaurant in Bala Cynwyd to celebrate the 50th anniversary of women in the Marines.
NEWS
October 18, 1997 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just as sound reproduction systems have evolved from the music box through the phonograph through the tape deck to the compact disc system, so have bicycles evolved: from the old penny farthing, through the coaster-brake models and the derailleur gear-shifts to the dirt bikes of today. Yet in both cases, interest in the earliest models persists. That will be evident in two auctions next week. At 4 p.m. Tuesday in West Chester, William H. Bunch will offer 60 balloon-tire bikes from the 1930s to the 1960s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
  The 4700 Wissahickon Ave. complex, once the home of the old Atwater Kent Manufacturing Co., producer of radios, will attract bidders, not broadcasters, next week with sales at two of its tenants. One will even offer a smattering of vintage radio equipment. The first sale will begin at 11 a.m. Sunday at 4700's Suite 101, where Material Culture, the fledgling auction house specializing in ethnic objects from around the world, will offer more than 475 lots of early and contemporary art and antiques from developing nations.
NEWS
May 5, 2010 | By Claudia Vargas INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William Goldstein, 91, of Willingboro, a radio and communication captain during World War II who for 30 years helped upgrade X-ray technology at many Southeastern Pennsylvania hospitals, died of congestive heart failure Monday in the Masonic Home of New Jersey. Following intense, yearlong training to be an operative for the Office of Strategic Services, Mr. Goldstein, known to everyone as Bill, decided he preferred communication electronics. He had grown up building radio sets in his basement, said his daughter Dena Goldstein Sharpe.
NEWS
March 23, 2003 | By Andrea Gerlin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
ASSEMBLY AREA SPARTAN, southern Iraq - The First Battalion, Fourth Marine Regiment's own vehicles could prove to be a tougher opponent than the Iraqi army. At least one-fifth of the battalion's large fleet of amphibious assault vehicles broke down, overheated, or ran out of fuel during the 100-mile trip from its dispersion area in northern Kuwait through rural terrain in southwestern Iraq. The journey took nearly 30 hours, ending early yesterday. Radio communication breakdowns during the latter stages hampered coordination among the battalion's five companies.
NEWS
October 5, 2001 | By Cynthia Burton INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia emergency officials said yesterday that the city has a plan - one that is constantly updated - to deal with a terrorist attack. Key city officials discussed the plan yesterday in response to questions the public and the media have asked since Sept. 11: Is the city prepared to deal with a terrorist attack, particularly by biological and chemical agents? "Although we are prepared to respond, we must strengthen our response," said City Managing Director Joseph Martz, who was joined at a briefing at Fire Headquarters by Police Commissioner John F. Timoney, Fire Commissioner Harold Hairston and other top emergency personnel.
NEWS
June 9, 2000 | By Matt Archbold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Montgomery County has applied to the state to increase its 911 surcharge from 68 cents up to $1 partly to raise money to fix shortcomings in its emergency dispatch radio system. "Dead spots" in radio coverage and an inability to communicate with officers inside heavily walled structures have plagued the $5 million system since it was installed in 1996. Those problems were exemplified last year in a simulated response to a possible hostage situation at Wissahickon High School.
NEWS
September 12, 1999 | By Chani Katzen, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The 180 members of the Marple Newtown Amateur Radio Club won't be partying when the year 2000 arrives. They will be glued to their ham radios and ready to assist, in case lights blink off, phone lines come down, or the world comes crashing down. Already, four area hospitals have asked them to stand by in case power fails. "In tornadoes or hurricanes or when power shuts down, hams are the only people that can communicate," said Walter Faust of Lansdowne, the club's president.
NEWS
June 6, 1999 | By Mark Binker, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Police departments and fire and ambulance companies throughout Bucks County will spend a total of about $8 million this summer to buy radio equipment that works with the new digital countywide dispatch system, communication officials said last week. Despite the price tag of almost $3,000 for each hand-held and in-vehicle radio, police chiefs around the county say the new system is worth the cost. Problems with aging equipment and with areas where the old analog system simply wouldn't work are strong arguments for new equipment, said Brent Wiggins, the county's director of communications.
NEWS
October 18, 1997 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Just as sound reproduction systems have evolved from the music box through the phonograph through the tape deck to the compact disc system, so have bicycles evolved: from the old penny farthing, through the coaster-brake models and the derailleur gear-shifts to the dirt bikes of today. Yet in both cases, interest in the earliest models persists. That will be evident in two auctions next week. At 4 p.m. Tuesday in West Chester, William H. Bunch will offer 60 balloon-tire bikes from the 1930s to the 1960s.
NEWS
August 30, 1995 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Chester County commissioners are expected to approve tomorrow a contract that East Brandywine Police Chief Arthur Brown expects to vastly improve his life. The $11.76 million deal is for a new public-safety radio communications system, a key component of the county's 911 project. The contractor is E.F. Johnson of Burnsville, Minn. Brown is one of many who says it's about time that the county replaces a patchwork system that has evolved in fits and starts. "The radios that we have in our police cars now are shot," Brown said.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | By Larry Parker, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Burlington County freeholder board gave preliminary approval yesterday to three bond ordinances totaling almost $4 million to fund several initiatives to upgrade the county's technology for the 21st century. A $1.8 million bond ordinance for county equipment will include $250,000 to install a closed-circuit video network between the county's Minimum Security Facility and Juvenile Detention Center, both in Pemberton Township, and the courthouse in Mount Holly. Retiring Sheriff Edward Cummings long campaigned for such a measure, to keep officers from having to escort prisoners between the jails and Mount Holly for court appearances.
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