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NEWS
June 23, 1990 | By KATHY DEACON
Law is literature, and this includes death penalty litigation. So malleable, so subject to the bias and imagination of those who interpret it, the law is being read in Pennsylvania to send Mumia Abu-Jamal to the electric chair. On Feb. 2 the Pennsylvania Supreme Court denied Jamal's petition to reargue his appeal upon conviction of killing a police officer. In doing so it left two institutional forces standing between the black journalist and execution: the U.S. Supreme Court and the governor.
NEWS
December 10, 1996 | GEORGE REYNOLDS/ DAILY NEWS
A police honor guard followed by a bagpiper marches slowly past pews of mourners in the Cathedral Basilica of Ss. Peter and Paul last evening at a memorial service to mark the 15th anniversary of the murder of Police Officer Daniel Faulkner (left). Faulkner was shot to death on Locust Street near 13th in December 1981 by radio journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal after the officer had stopped Abu-Jamal's brother for a traffic violation. Abu-Jamal was convicted of the slaying in 1982 and sentenced to death.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After hours of heated debate, parliamentary confusion and numerous votes, the National Association of Black Journalists yesterday adopted a resolution that stops short of calling for a new trial for death-row inmate and radio journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal. In a 34-15 vote, with three abstentions, members supported an official statement that calls for "full and fair disclosure and judicial examination of all the facts involved" in the case of the former radio journalist who once headed the association's Philadelphia chapter.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In the opening moments of "The Brave One," Jodie Foster strolls with her fiance into Central Park, where they are savagely attacked. Before the beating, as the lovers embrace in their quiet, leafy Eden (take note of the apple), director Neil Jordan gooses the soundtrack with the ominous, deafening noise of a low-flying jetliner. It doesn't take the anniversary of 9/11 to tip us to the fact that the movie is seeking some linkage here. (For good measure, the assault is videotaped, so that a grainy video lives on as a sickening memento of the bloody event)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The most potent passages of A Mighty Heart play like love letters from Daniel Pearl to the son he never met, as transcribed by his widow, Mariane. And they are undeniably powerful. But for the most part, Michael Winterbottom's well-intended film, the true story of an idealistic journalist and his gallant wife disinvites emotion by focusing on process at the expense of passion. Pearl, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal , arrived in Karachi, Pakistan, early in 2002, committed to opening dialogue among Islamists, Christians and Jews.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The most potent passages ofA Mighty Heart play like love letters from Daniel Pearl to the son he never met, as transcribed by his widow, Mariane. And they are undeniably powerful. But for the most part, Michael Winterbottom's well-intended film, the true story of an idealistic journalist and his gallant wife disinvites emotion by focusing on process at the expense of passion. Pearl, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, arrived in Karachi, Pakistan, early in 2002, committed to opening dialogue among Islamists, Christians and Jews.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine a celebrated novelist swaggering his way through reconnaissance missions; magazine photographers following soldiers into the thick of Japanese mortar fire; a radio journalist giving daily eyewitness accounts of the hail of German bombs on London. Those personalities, and their exploits, seem to summon up a more heroic time, for both the media and the U.S. military it covered. And to stroll through "Reporting the War: The Journalistic Coverage of World War II" at the National Portrait Gallery is to find our way back to this era, when Ernest Hemingway fought with the French Resistance forces he was covering and Edward R. Murrow braved the London blitz.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ed Rendell? Pat Croce? (Hey, wasn't he a folksinger?) Mary Mason? Just who are these people, and what in the world is a John Bolaris? Fret not, newbie. We're going to break it all down for you. Want to sound hip, fit in, and be able to identify Philadelphia's most famous - and infamous - residents at 20 paces? Read on. Mumia Abu-Jamal is no longer in Philadelphia - he's on death row in Huntingdon, Pa. - but remains one of its most intensely discussed former residents. Abu-Jamal, a radio journalist, cab driver, Black Panther and MOVE supporter, was convicted 14 years ago of the murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | By Julie Stoiber, Monica Yant and Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
About 10,000 supporters of death-row celebrity Mumia Abu-Jamal jammed the west apron of City Hall yesterday in an emotional, almost-festive rally that paired fresh-faced high school students with veterans of Vietnam-era marches. Exhausted from all-night travel, some protesters dozed in the sun as dogs, bongo drums, balloons, babies, bicyclists, and Kool-Aid-colored hairdos swirled around them. There were no clashes between police and the protesters, who came to demand a new trial for Abu-Jamal, convicted in 1982 of killing Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.
LIVING
August 1, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the eyes of the world are indeed on Philadelphia this week, radio talk-show host Michael Smerconish wants them to see his anger. And that of his listeners. Listeners who say they are fed up with liberals and their sympathies for the criminals of America. Those sorts of people have forgotten the victims, Smerconish says. "For as long as I have been on the radio, I have believed that perpetrators get too much attention and victims get too little. " This afternoon at 5, Smerconish, whose show airs 5 to 7 p.m. weekdays on WPHT-AM (1210)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2007 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com 215-854-5992
In the opening moments of "The Brave One," Jodie Foster strolls with her fiance into Central Park, where they are savagely attacked. Before the beating, as the lovers embrace in their quiet, leafy Eden (take note of the apple), director Neil Jordan gooses the soundtrack with the ominous, deafening noise of a low-flying jetliner. It doesn't take the anniversary of 9/11 to tip us to the fact that the movie is seeking some linkage here. (For good measure, the assault is videotaped, so that a grainy video lives on as a sickening memento of the bloody event)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The most potent passages ofA Mighty Heart play like love letters from Daniel Pearl to the son he never met, as transcribed by his widow, Mariane. And they are undeniably powerful. But for the most part, Michael Winterbottom's well-intended film, the true story of an idealistic journalist and his gallant wife disinvites emotion by focusing on process at the expense of passion. Pearl, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, arrived in Karachi, Pakistan, early in 2002, committed to opening dialogue among Islamists, Christians and Jews.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2007 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
The most potent passages of A Mighty Heart play like love letters from Daniel Pearl to the son he never met, as transcribed by his widow, Mariane. And they are undeniably powerful. But for the most part, Michael Winterbottom's well-intended film, the true story of an idealistic journalist and his gallant wife disinvites emotion by focusing on process at the expense of passion. Pearl, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal , arrived in Karachi, Pakistan, early in 2002, committed to opening dialogue among Islamists, Christians and Jews.
LIVING
August 1, 2000 | By Kevin L. Carter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If the eyes of the world are indeed on Philadelphia this week, radio talk-show host Michael Smerconish wants them to see his anger. And that of his listeners. Listeners who say they are fed up with liberals and their sympathies for the criminals of America. Those sorts of people have forgotten the victims, Smerconish says. "For as long as I have been on the radio, I have believed that perpetrators get too much attention and victims get too little. " This afternoon at 5, Smerconish, whose show airs 5 to 7 p.m. weekdays on WPHT-AM (1210)
NEWS
April 25, 1999 | By Julie Stoiber, Monica Yant and Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
About 10,000 supporters of death-row celebrity Mumia Abu-Jamal jammed the west apron of City Hall yesterday in an emotional, almost-festive rally that paired fresh-faced high school students with veterans of Vietnam-era marches. Exhausted from all-night travel, some protesters dozed in the sun as dogs, bongo drums, balloons, babies, bicyclists, and Kool-Aid-colored hairdos swirled around them. There were no clashes between police and the protesters, who came to demand a new trial for Abu-Jamal, convicted in 1982 of killing Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.
NEWS
December 10, 1996 | GEORGE REYNOLDS/ DAILY NEWS
A police honor guard followed by a bagpiper marches slowly past pews of mourners in the Cathedral Basilica of Ss. Peter and Paul last evening at a memorial service to mark the 15th anniversary of the murder of Police Officer Daniel Faulkner (left). Faulkner was shot to death on Locust Street near 13th in December 1981 by radio journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal after the officer had stopped Abu-Jamal's brother for a traffic violation. Abu-Jamal was convicted of the slaying in 1982 and sentenced to death.
NEWS
September 5, 1996 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Ed Rendell? Pat Croce? (Hey, wasn't he a folksinger?) Mary Mason? Just who are these people, and what in the world is a John Bolaris? Fret not, newbie. We're going to break it all down for you. Want to sound hip, fit in, and be able to identify Philadelphia's most famous - and infamous - residents at 20 paces? Read on. Mumia Abu-Jamal is no longer in Philadelphia - he's on death row in Huntingdon, Pa. - but remains one of its most intensely discussed former residents. Abu-Jamal, a radio journalist, cab driver, Black Panther and MOVE supporter, was convicted 14 years ago of the murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner.
NEWS
August 19, 1995 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
After hours of heated debate, parliamentary confusion and numerous votes, the National Association of Black Journalists yesterday adopted a resolution that stops short of calling for a new trial for death-row inmate and radio journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal. In a 34-15 vote, with three abstentions, members supported an official statement that calls for "full and fair disclosure and judicial examination of all the facts involved" in the case of the former radio journalist who once headed the association's Philadelphia chapter.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1994 | By Julia M. Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Imagine a celebrated novelist swaggering his way through reconnaissance missions; magazine photographers following soldiers into the thick of Japanese mortar fire; a radio journalist giving daily eyewitness accounts of the hail of German bombs on London. Those personalities, and their exploits, seem to summon up a more heroic time, for both the media and the U.S. military it covered. And to stroll through "Reporting the War: The Journalistic Coverage of World War II" at the National Portrait Gallery is to find our way back to this era, when Ernest Hemingway fought with the French Resistance forces he was covering and Edward R. Murrow braved the London blitz.
NEWS
June 23, 1990 | By KATHY DEACON
Law is literature, and this includes death penalty litigation. So malleable, so subject to the bias and imagination of those who interpret it, the law is being read in Pennsylvania to send Mumia Abu-Jamal to the electric chair. On Feb. 2 the Pennsylvania Supreme Court denied Jamal's petition to reargue his appeal upon conviction of killing a police officer. In doing so it left two institutional forces standing between the black journalist and execution: the U.S. Supreme Court and the governor.
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