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Radio Shack

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NEWS
March 12, 1998 | By Raphael Lewis, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
There's little question that Upper Darby Police Capt. Rudy D'Alesio recalls the night of Feb. 3, 1997: the bullets whizzing toward him, the two men with their pistols blazing, and the terror of staring death in the eye. "I felt as if it was in slow motion," D'Alesio told a Delaware County jury yesterday, testifying against three men accused of robbing a Radio Shack, then fleeing in a hail of gunfire. "They were both looking at me, they were both firing, and I thought I was going to die. " What defense attorneys question, however, is D'Alesio's recollection of who exactly shot at him - and who shot an 8-year-old bystander in the neck along the way. Under direct examination by Assistant District Attorney Michael R. Galantino, D'Alesio pointed with confidence to Duan Seay, 31, and Damon Jones, 24, as the men who fired at him from the rear windows of the late-model, brown car. D'Alesio did not testify about seeing the third defendant, Seay's 28-year-old brother, Damon.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
The armed robber seemed to enter the Radio Shack in Upper Darby right on cue. The employees had just tuned in to America's Most Wanted - the crime- fighting show that focuses on dangerous fugitives - when real-life drama took over. Radio Shack assistant manager Patricia Ames testified Thursday that she and a co-worker were watching the show March 8 when the robber approached her and pulled a shotgun from under his sweater. "I saw the trigger. Then I saw the black barrel," she testified.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | By Julia Cass, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They met at the Susquehanna Valley Mall in 1980 when they were co-workers on the maintenance staff. They became casual friends. Charles "Chuck" DeVetsco, 30 at the time, was a former radio newsman who had decided he would rather be inside the ambulance, helping victims, than outside, reporting on them. He was working part time at the mall while awaiting admission into a paramedic program. Keith Zettlemoyer, 25 at the time, was a loner with a lifelong personality disorder, according to testimony during his trial by his parents and a psychologist.
NEWS
June 20, 1994 | by Jonathan Takiff, Daily News Staff Writer
Q: One of my pleasures as a kid was riding around the neighborhood on my two wheeler, with music blaring from a special bike radio attached to the handlebars. Does anybody make bike radios nowadays, and have they improved any? A: Yes and yes. Emerson Radio - lately into the retro thing with old- fashioned table radio reproductions - has just introduced a new and significantly improved version of the Bike Radio. Dressed up in yellow and gray hard plastic, the receiver picks up FM and AM broadcast bands.
NEWS
November 27, 1999 | by Theresa Conroy , Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
The Wal-Mart parking lot had seen better days. The large asphalt area was strewn yesterday with errant shopping carts and crumpled piles of abandoned circulars. Cars filled with frantic Christmas bargain hunters jammed into spots. Those less fortunate circled and circled and circled, looking for a place to park their sleighs. It was the official kickoff of the Christmas shopping season, and by early afternoon, Wal-Mart on Delaware Avenue had run out of many of its hot sale items.
NEWS
December 8, 1988 | By Lou Perfidio, Special to The Inquirer
The sign on the night deposit box outside the Fidelity Bank building at the corner of Routes 73 and 202 read "Out of Order. " There was an arrow pointing to a file cabinet placed below. For at least one local business, the sign might as well have read "Out of Money. " That's because the bank didn't put the filing cabinet there. Somebody else did. And about $11,000 that the manager of U.S. Restaurants Inc. thought he was putting in his company's account on Saturday night is missing.
SPORTS
March 7, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Baltimore Orioles slugger Albert Belle reportedly has decided to retire. WBAL radio in Baltimore, citing unnamed sources close to the situation, reported that by tomorrow, the 34-year-old outfielder will announce his retirement because of an arthritic right hip. Bill Stetka, the Orioles' director of public relations, did not confirm nor deny the report and said no announcement has been scheduled. Belle has three seasons left on a $65 million, five-year contract. He will receive the remaining $39 million whether he plays or not. The Orioles have an insurance policy that reportedly will cover 70 percent of the amount.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | By Lyn A.E. McCafferty, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Maurice Owens was busy. Boy, was he busy. At 7:45 p.m. March 8, 1991, he robbed a pizza shop at 56th and Delancey Streets in Philadelphia. Five minutes later, he jumped into a cab and held up the cabbie with a sawed-off shotgun. The cabbie jumped ship. By 8:05 or so, Owens had driven over the border into Upper Darby and robbed a Radio Shack at 68th and Market Streets. Then he drove the stolen cab back into the city, and picked up and dropped off a fare. He was caught by police at 8:25 p.m. Those 40 minutes will cost Owens plenty of time.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES Inquirer staff writer Rosland Briggs contributed to this report
Tandy Corp. said yesterday it would close its two area Computer City locations Thursday. It also said it would sell or close all 17 of its Incredible Universe consumer-electronics stores. The Cherry Hill and King of Prussia Computer City stores, which, combined, employ about 70 people, are two of 19 that will be closed, Tandy spokesman Ron Trumbla said. Two other stores will be relocated. The company will continue to operate 89 stores of the chain that started in 1991. The Fort Worth, Texas, retailer, which also operates Radio Shack, said the Computer City closings were part of a strategy to gear the store toward home-office markets.
BUSINESS
May 17, 1996 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
Bryn Mawr Stereo & Video of King of Prussia has been purchased by Tweeter etc. , a Canton, Mass.-based consumer electronics company. Tweeter officials said no store closings are planned and the Bryn Mawr operation will retain its name. Bryn Mawr Stereo has annual sales of $35 million and 170 employees. Combined with Tweeter, it will have annual sales of $105 million and 550 employees. Bryn Mawr Stereo's headquarters in King of Prussia will become a regional office of Tweeter.
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BUSINESS
October 27, 2011 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Oracle Corp. boss Larry Ellison didn't used to like this cloud-computing thing. He expected Oracle would keep selling big business software systems, updates, and maintenance onto client servers, instead of letting customers move their secure data functions online to the world computing cloud. In a famous 2008 investor conference (you can watch it on YouTube), Ellison called the cloud-computing idea "gibberish" and "crap" and "idiocy. " But on Monday, Oracle agreed to pay $1.5 billion for RightNow Technologies Inc. , a Bozeman, Mont., firm that makes cloud-based customer-management software in competition with Newtown Square-based SAP Americas , Oracle's rival.
BUSINESS
September 12, 2011 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
Like any good son, Fred Allegrezza wanted to make life easier for his mother. Unlike most sons with magnanimous ambitions, Allegrezza's actually led to a business - one aimed at helping the AARP generation turn on and tune in. To the Internet, that is. Allegrezza's business plan has a financial and a social bottom line - build profit and make isolation a less pervasive part of growing old. At the center of his entrepreneurial endeavor...
SPORTS
April 18, 2005 | Daily News Wire Services
It took Greg Biffle a little while to overcome the mental and physical discomfort from a crash in practice at Texas Motor Speedway. It took hardly any time at all for him to make the rest of the field feel bad in yesterday's Samsung/RadioShack 500. "I was sore when I went to bed, sore when I woke up and I'm still sore," said Biffle, who ran over debris on the track during a Nextel Cup practice on Saturday, cutting down the right front tire...
NEWS
January 1, 2002 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin L. Fleishman, 75, of Rydal, a retired podiatrist, World War II pilot, ham radio operator, photographer, auto racer, and astronomer, died of cancer Friday at Holy Redeemer Hospital in Philadelphia. A renaissance man, Dr. Fleishman spoke to senior citizens groups about foot care and to schoolchildren about the mysteries of the cosmos. He practiced podiatry in Northeast Philadelphia for 30 years until retiring in 1987 and also taught podiatric surgery at several area hospitals.
SPORTS
March 7, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Baltimore Orioles slugger Albert Belle reportedly has decided to retire. WBAL radio in Baltimore, citing unnamed sources close to the situation, reported that by tomorrow, the 34-year-old outfielder will announce his retirement because of an arthritic right hip. Bill Stetka, the Orioles' director of public relations, did not confirm nor deny the report and said no announcement has been scheduled. Belle has three seasons left on a $65 million, five-year contract. He will receive the remaining $39 million whether he plays or not. The Orioles have an insurance policy that reportedly will cover 70 percent of the amount.
NEWS
November 28, 2000 | by Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writer
Let's start with the basics, fellas. You can save yourself a lot of headaches this holiday shopping season if you arm yourself for battle before you take one step out the front door. Here goes: The first thing to ensure a quick, productive shopping experience is to go alone. You don't need friends or family members slowing you down as they try to drop hints about what you should buy them. Make a plan before you leave the house. Don't wait till you reach the crazed, overcrowded mall to decide what you want to buy your wife, kids or mother.
NEWS
November 27, 1999 | by Theresa Conroy , Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
The Wal-Mart parking lot had seen better days. The large asphalt area was strewn yesterday with errant shopping carts and crumpled piles of abandoned circulars. Cars filled with frantic Christmas bargain hunters jammed into spots. Those less fortunate circled and circled and circled, looking for a place to park their sleighs. It was the official kickoff of the Christmas shopping season, and by early afternoon, Wal-Mart on Delaware Avenue had run out of many of its hot sale items.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | by Mister Mann Frisby, Daily News Staff Writer
It's not easy being cool, because as soon as you get it down to a science, BAM, the trends change and you're left with a closet full of Hawaiian shirts. Anyone who ran out and bought a Betamax or multicolored leg warmers in the '80s can relate. It's not as simple as wearing the right clothes, although the rags you pick play a big part in an individual's cool factor. Furniture, electronics, where you hang out, also play into the equation. Really cool people realize that summer is here and it's time to get the their act together.
NEWS
May 10, 1999 | By Carrie Budoff, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The idea came from the news, a simple reminder to change your smoke-detector batteries when moving your clocks ahead or back in the spring and fall. At that moment, Jordan Wompierski, a 10-year-old always on the prowl for a new invention, had a breakthrough: Why not create a clock with a built-in smoke detector? From that idea came the Life-Time, a clock-and-detector-in-one devised by Jordan and his fifth-grade classmate Catherine Horan. The pair took first place at a regional invention competition, called Students Inventions Through Education, held in Pomona on April 28. Next month, their work will be submitted in Invent America, a program run by the U.S. Patent Model Foundation in Alexandria, Va. This is just the latest chapter in Jordan's career as a young inventor.
NEWS
June 14, 1998 | By Doug Lansky, FOR THE INQUIRER
I'd like to tell you about an ongoing radio show that you could call "Truck Talk," which is nothing like Car Talk, the popular NPR program in which two brothers spend 70 percent of their air time laughing hysterically at their own jokes. "Truck Talk" features real truckers discussing real trucking issues that go to the very core of the contemporary trucking lifestyle, such as if the female driver approaching in the left lane has nice legs. You probably haven't heard this show, which covers America's roadways day and night, because you need a special radio to listen in. The only reason I know this is because I recently spent three months driving around America with my fiance, Signe.
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