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Radio Stations

NEWS
November 1, 1990 | By Wanda Motley and Brigette ReDavid, Special to The Inquirer
Good news for alternative-music fans on the Main Line. Come January, the radio stations at Cabrini College and Villanova University, which have long dedicated their formats to music considered off the beaten track, are hitting the big time with a spot on the FM dial. Both stations have been trying for years to get approval from the Federal Communications Commission for a license in the Philadelphia area, whose airwaves are so jammed with radio signals that it has been virtually impossible for a new station to break into a slot.
BUSINESS
November 3, 1986 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
More than half the homes in the Philadelphia area recently heard from WCAU- AM. But the greeting didn't come over radio speakers. The news/talk radio station says it mailed 1,025,000 individually numbered sweepstakes fliers, inviting area residents to try to win some of the more than $150,000 in prizes it's giving away. One requirement: You have to listen to the station. Like other broadcasters in the brutally competitive radio industry, the CBS-owned radio station is trying to buy a larger audience.
NEWS
July 21, 1987 | By DAVE BITTAN, Daily News Staff Writer
The guy who played the rock disc jockey in "American Graffiti" - the classic George Lucas 1973 film that nostagically re-created the 1960s teen scene - was a gruff-voiced real life DJ named Wolfman Jack (real name Robert Smith, from Brooklyn). Tonight at 11, Wolfman talks with Larry King about the days when the Wolfman Jack show was heard on more than 2,000 radio stations - including the Bakersfield, Cal. station on which George Lucas listened to Wolfman's patter and music. Wolfman Jack recalls that when he met Elvis Presley years ago, Elvis asked for his autograph.
NEWS
September 15, 2001 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
In times of national grief, many people turn to popular music to lift their spirits and articulate their sorrow. And since the terrorist attacks on Tuesday, radio stations have turned to old standbys and new songs as they search for the right music to put the moment in perspective. So far, Lee Greenwood's "God Bless the U.S.A. " is the big winner. On Wednesday, the country singer's patriotic anthem - which was released in 1984 and became a familiar presence during the gulf war - was the most-played song nationwide, ahead of Alicia Keys' "Fallin'," according to Mediabase 24/7, a national radio-monitoring service.
NEWS
August 27, 1991 | By Kevin L. Carter, Inquirer Staff Writer
Power 99 is the area's most popular music station, says the Arbitron rating service. So you'd expect Bruce Holberg, general manager of Power 99 (WUSL-FM, 98.9), to be pretty happy with Arbitron. Wrong. Arbitron, which rates radio stations by measuring their audiences, does not adequately reflect the size of his or other black-oriented stations' audiences, Holberg says. Cody Anderson agrees. He's the owner, general manager and afternoon talk- show host of WHAT-AM (1340)
BUSINESS
June 25, 2004 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A divided three-judge federal appeals court in Philadelphia told the Federal Communications Commission yesterday to reconsider the impact of its new rules allowing broader ownership of multiple radio and television stations in a region. While affirming some easing of the rules governing media cross-ownership, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit kept in place its order blocking implementation of the rules until the FCC reexamined how they would affect the diversity of viewpoints in a region.
NEWS
September 19, 2005 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the seconds ticking away to air time, news anchor Wendy Griffith had adjusted her microphone, retouched her makeup, practiced the tough pronunciations, taken a last sip of water. It was time for a final check - with God. As the crew and staff bowed their heads, Griffith prayed, first for the victims of Hurricane Katrina, and then for a successful broadcast: "We ask you to be with us and that things will go smoothly, and that through our show, people out there will get to know you better.
NEWS
September 11, 1999 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Federal Communications Commission has had its first setback in a campaign against unlicensed radio stations, courtesy of a law Congress passed six years ago to prevent government restrictions on religion. The odd stalemate, illustrating the sometimes unforeseen effects of legislation, occurred last month in the FCC's move to shutter two unlicensed FM radio stations broadcasting in Bethlehem and Lancaster. For the FCC, which has strong powers to license the nation's radio waves to prevent signal interference, such cases are traditionally a regulatory slam-dunk.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1999 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Entercom Communications Corp., a Bala Cynwyd company that has been gobbling up radio stations for several years, yesterday reached an agreement to buy 43 radio stations for $821.5 million in cash. It would be Entercom's largest radio deal yet, reached with the Sinclair Broadcast Group of Baltimore, and shows the frenzy surrounding the consolidation of FM and AM stations. The deals are driven by radio's growing popularity with advertisers and a loosening of ownership rules.
NEWS
June 19, 2002 | By Sara Isadora Mancuso INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Though it already saturates the Garden State's airwaves, Millennium Radio Group L.L.C. has expanded its control in New Jersey by acquiring five more stations this week. The stations are WJLK-FM and WADB-AM, both in Asbury Park; WBBO-FM in Manahawkin; and WOBM-AM and WOBM-FM, both in Toms River. They were sold for about $100 million by Nassau Broadcasting Partners in Princeton, said Andy Santoro, group vice president and New Jersey manager for Millennium, which is based in Amherst, N.Y. Millennium's 12 stations in Atlantic City and Trenton and in Monmouth and Ocean Counties could grow by one more if plans to buy WCHR-FM in Ocean County proceed.
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