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Radio Stations

NEWS
January 23, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Local lawyer Ragan Henry, through his wife, Regina, agreed in principal Friday to buy oldies station WFIL-AM (560) for just under $7 million, with an eye toward turning it into a talk, interview and information station. "That's my gut feeling right now," said Henry, who already owns 10 stations across the country. "But whenever we buy a station, we do considerable research to see what the market will bear. It also tells us to what degree we should aim to reach the black community or the community in general.
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Michael Venditti, 46, a radio-station chief engineer who helped build stations around the country and also was a pioneer in comtemporary Christian music radio, died April 27 at his Cherry Hill home after battling cancer for 17 months. Born in Riverside, he was raised in Burlington City and Edgewater Park. He had lived in Cherry Hill for three years. Mr. Venditti was the co-owner of WNJC-AM (1360) in Washington Township, where he worked in sales and engineering and as an on-the-air personality.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1990 | By Mark de la Vina, Daily News Staff Writer
Although several Philadelphia radio stations are celebrating what would have been John Lennon's 50th birthday today, the former Beatle is practically a nonentity among people born after 1970. For many college-age students, Lennon isn't a pop figure with whom they can easily identify. Give 'em U2 or R.E.M. anyday. Dan Schwartz, a 20-year-old associate editor for the Daily Pennsylvanian, explained that Lennon appeals more to the thirtysomething crowd. "He's so removed from our generation," Schwartz said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1986 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dorothy E. Brunson, a black broadcaster from Baltimore, has been awarded the right to operate a television station on Channel 48 in the Philadelphia area. The new station is expected to become the first in a top-10 market to be wholly black-owned. Brunson, who owns three AM radio stations, was selected by an administrative law judge for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The regulatory agency announced the decision yesterday. Competition for the license, which is allocated to Burlington, N.J., was touched off when WKBS-TV vacated Channel 48 in August 1983.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1989 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
There are radio stations that play only country music or rock 'n' roll, and radio stations that specialize in "all-news" or "talk. " Philadelphia attorney and entrepreneur Ragan Henry hopes that soon there will be radio stations that solely feature programs for little kids. To that end, Henry, who owns several radio stations in the United States, and Linda Katz and Marcia Moon, co-directors of the Philadelphia-based, non- profit Children's Literacy Initiative, have formed a joint venture called "The Children's Radio Network Inc. " According to Moon, the network will pre-record in Philadelphia sufficient programming to fill 13 hours per day, seven days a week of radio time and will attempt to syndicate it to AM stations looking for a new and different format.
NEWS
July 8, 2004 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tom Bigby, who helped engineer the sports-talk format at WIP-AM (610) and as program director ran the station with an iron fist for 15 years, has announced that he is leaving later this month. Bigby, 61, will become program director at all-news KRLD-AM in Dallas, where his children and grandchildren live. Like WIP, KRLD is a property of Infinity Broadcasting. His last day in Philadelphia will be July 23. The move by Bigby was generally unexpected among the ranks but appears to be voluntary.
NEWS
December 12, 2005 | By Stephen R. Schwartz
Once again, local radio stations have burned me out on Christmas music. How is that possible? After all, the month between Thanksgiving and Christmas had always been my favorite time of year. People seemed more kind to one another as those wonderful songs rang out and filled the holiday air. But no more. There was a time when holiday songs didn't come to play until Black Friday, when radio stations would air one, maybe two an hour - just enough to set a proper mood. As Christmas drew closer, more were added.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1997 | By Lisa Marie Pane, REUTERS Inquirer staff writer Bob Fernandez contributed to this report
Evergreen Media Corp., already the nation's largest radio broadcasting company, yesterday agreed to buy Chancellor Broadcasting Co. and Viacom Inc.'s radio stations for a combined $2.58 billion in stock, cash and debt. The merger and the $1.075 billion purchase of the Viacom stations would create a business worth $5 billion, the companies said. "This takes them from three companies with pretty strong positions to a juggernaut," said Bankers Trust analyst Mark McFadden. The 10 Viacom properties are in Los Angeles, Chicago, New York, Washington and Detroit.
NEWS
April 3, 1990 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush asked the nation's broadcasters yesterday to support the government's new TV Marti broadcasts to Cuba, and he pledged that "the voice of freedom will not be stilled as long as there is an America to tell the truth. " The Cuban government has jammed the TV Marti broadcasts since the project began last Tuesday. Cuba has warned that unless the broadcasts cease, Radio Marti - another Voice of America project aimed at Cuba - might also be jammed. Executives of U.S. television and radio stations meeting here have expressed concern that TV Marti might draw retaliation.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1987 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Delta Air Lines flying under dark clouds in recent weeks, its problems have been natural fodder for comedians, television hosts and radio personalities. A rash of incidents, including a Delta jet landing at the wrong airport and another straying into the paths of other jets, has turned the airline, unwittingly, into prime material for satire. But Delta apparently isn't laughing. At least two radio stations report that they recently got telephone calls grounding their Delta advertising after spoofs of airline problems.
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