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NEWS
April 3, 1990 | By Ellen Warren, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Bush asked the nation's broadcasters yesterday to support the government's new TV Marti broadcasts to Cuba, and he pledged that "the voice of freedom will not be stilled as long as there is an America to tell the truth. " The Cuban government has jammed the TV Marti broadcasts since the project began last Tuesday. Cuba has warned that unless the broadcasts cease, Radio Marti - another Voice of America project aimed at Cuba - might also be jammed. Executives of U.S. television and radio stations meeting here have expressed concern that TV Marti might draw retaliation.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1987 | By Neill Borowski, Inquirer Staff Writer
With Delta Air Lines flying under dark clouds in recent weeks, its problems have been natural fodder for comedians, television hosts and radio personalities. A rash of incidents, including a Delta jet landing at the wrong airport and another straying into the paths of other jets, has turned the airline, unwittingly, into prime material for satire. But Delta apparently isn't laughing. At least two radio stations report that they recently got telephone calls grounding their Delta advertising after spoofs of airline problems.
NEWS
January 16, 2004
RE the arrogant Michael Smerconish's Jan. 8 column: Perhaps the reason why there are only "conservative" hosts is because about six corporations own the entire U.S. media, and they're all run by big-time Republican contributors. (Infinity boasts on their Web site about owning 180 radio stations in the biggest markets in 22 states. Not healthy.) He's right when he says Al Franken and Jeanne Garofalo wouldn't make it in talk radio: You'd have a stream of idiots calling station managers nationwide whining about how "liberal" the media really is and how their talk shows are proof of it. The reason NPR is taxpayer-financed is that they don't have the bottomless pockets that conservatives do. They don't have billionaires like Richard Mellon Scaife and Rupert Murdoch to bankroll them.
NEWS
May 30, 2003
THE FCC will vote soon to deregulate the communications industry. At stake is democracy. There are five major players in the industry: Fox, Viacom, Paramount, Disney, and GE. Only one newspaper owned by these five conglomerates editorialized against cross-media alignment. This legislation will allow them to increase their holdings while crossing over into different media in the same market. This will place into fewer hands control over what we read, hear and see. This will endanger independents who keep localism, diversity and competition alive.
NEWS
May 19, 1986
I am writing in reference to the decision to give Cleveland the honor of playing home to the rock-and-roll Hall of Fame, when we know Philadelphia is undoubtedly the birthplace of rock-and-roll. I urge all Philadelphia musicians who believe that Philadelphia is the birthplace of rock-and-roll to withhold their material from Cleveland and for Philadelphia to establish a rock-and-roll museum here. I urge people to call or write to city officials, radio stations, musicians, etc., and give their support to this issue.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1988 | By SUSAN GUREVITZ, Special to the Daily News
Yes Virginia, there is life beyond mortgage payments and college tuition. One that includes spending lots of money on health spa memberships, new cars and small home appliances. But, according to five local radio stations, most marketers are ignoring the growing segment of the population that has outgrown the in-debt-up-to- their-eyebrows yuppie lifestyle and today controls the bulk of the country's wealth. The radio stations are saying to advertisers that "there's another market beyond age 54," says Roy Shapiro, general manager of KYW-AM radio, who turned 50 last June.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2005 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Sony BMG Music Entertainment agreed yesterday to pay $10 million and stop bribing radio stations to feature its artists in what a state official here called a sophisticated generation of the payola scandals of decades ago. The agreement was announced by New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, who has been investigating the music industry's "pay-to-play" practices. Yesterday, he called the practice "pervasive" and suggested that other music-industry giants could face similar penalties.
NEWS
July 25, 1989 | By Joseph Grace, Daily News Staff Writer
The temperature may have been in the 90s yesterday, but cooler heads in city government were thinking snow. Specifically, how to best shovel out snow-day information on school closings. After 28 years as a city service, the radio bulletin program notifying parents of which schools will be closed due to snow is going private. The city and KYW Newsradio (1060-AM) announced yesterday that KYW would assume responsibility for gathering and distributing the radio bulletin alerts on school closings beginning this fall.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | By DAVID HINCKLEY, New York Daily News
Let's put it this way: The people who handle publicity for George Michael aren't exactly upset over the discussion generated by "I Want Your Sex," his new single. Since the title pretty much sums up the song ("Sex is something we should do/Sex is something for me and you"), some radio stations have refused to play it - fearing it sounds like an endorsement of, yup, casual sex. Meanwhile, the video was too steamy for MTV. "We passed on it in its current form," a spokesperson confirms.
NEWS
September 11, 1997 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gene Graves, 85, a former promotion department employee of The Inquirer and Daily News, died Monday at Bryn Mawr Hospital of complications from surgery for angioplasty. He lived in Gladwyne. Mr. Graves devoted most of his life to promotions, whether it was with newspapers, radio stations, the circus, golf tournaments or horse shows. He was born in England to circus parents; his mother was a trick-horse rider and his father was a superintendent of properties, a job that included overseeing the raising of the big top. His parents immigrated to the United States in 1915, settling in Milford, Conn.
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