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NEWS
July 26, 2010
John E. Irving, 78, who helped turn his family's lumber business into Atlantic Canada's largest conglomerate, died Wednesday in St. John, New Brunswick. No cause of death was given. Along with his father, K.C. Irving, and his brothers James and Arthur, John E. Irving helped direct an expansion of the family's business after World War II that led it to dominate the economy of their home province. Today the family is among Canada's wealthiest and controls about 300 companies, with interests in oil refining, retailing, and distribution as well as lumber, paper, steel, hardware, trucking, shipbuilding, shipping, railroads, printing, and consumer products.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By JOHN F. MORRISON, morrisj@phillynews.com 215-854-5573
BILL WEBBER often said that he didn't look forward to retirement. He said that he wanted to continue working until they put him in the ground - "and maybe longer. " William W. Webber, known as "Wee Willie Webber" to countless TV and radio fans in Philadelphia for more than half a century, longtime officer of the Broadcast Pioneers of Philadelphia and a man who never turned down a request to do a fundraiser, telethon or other charitable benefit, died yesterday. He was 80 and lived in Center City.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Awash in nostalgia and amped-up male camaraderie, Richard Curtis' Pirate Radio takes a great story - the hugely popular offshore radio stations that illegally broadcast pop and rock in 1960s Britain - and turns it into an aggressively irritating floating frat-party romp. Bobbing on an ebullient soundtrack of the Kinks, the Who, "I Feel Free," and "A Whiter Shade of Pale," Pirate Radio plops a gang of misfit DJs down on a red-hulled ship in the North Sea, where they spin vinyl and speak naughtily to schoolgirls, nurses, and university students - all of them listening giddily to the rock-and-roll the government doesn't want them to hear.
NEWS
October 28, 2009 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
William J. Henrich Jr., 80, of Lafayette Hill, a preeminent real estate and trust lawyer and an adviser to the publishing magnate Walter H. Annenberg, died Saturday of heart failure at his home. Mr. Henrich spent most of his career as a senior partner at the Center City firm of Dilworth Paxson L.L.P., where colleagues remembered him as "the very definition of a partner. " "He was a first-rate lawyer and a first-rate business executive," said Stephen J. Harmelin, Dilworth's managing partner.
NEWS
September 23, 2009 | By Helen Bruner and Terry Jones
Radio station owners are gathering in Philadelphia today for the National Association of Broadcasters' Radio Show, where they will share stories about surviving this economy and celebrate radio's bright future - a future in which they will rely on music more than ever. Here in Philadelphia, radio stations are already pumping out more music on new HD signals. Twenty-five local stations broadcast in HD, and 13 offer additional music formats. More listeners are tuning in to these radio signals, too, as portable music players such as the iPod and Zune add FM and HD capabilities.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2009 | Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HOURS AFTER "Survivor" winner Richard Hatch proclaimed on "Today" and on two radio stations Tuesday that being gay is what landed him in prison, Hatch had his infamously naked butt hauled into jail again. For being gay? Nope, for running his mouth. WPRO-AM host John DePetro said that Hatch called in to his radio show twice without the station first getting permission from the federal Bureau of Prisons. Hatch, who had been serving out the remainder of his prison term for tax evasion on home confinement in Newport, R.I., was taken into custody Tuesday afternoon, just hours after his diatribes aired on WPRO, "Today" and WJAR-TV.
NEWS
July 12, 2009 | By Jonathan Storm INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
A small device introduced two years ago in Philadelphia is altering a troubled industry. The gizmo is called a portable people meter (PPM), and participants in ratings surveys - some as young as 6 - carry it everywhere. The meter reports what those who tote it around are hearing. Until 2007, Arbitron Inc., the research firm that compiles radio ratings, calculated audience size by analyzing diaries kept by a random sample of listeners. While some are happy about the new system, others see it as flawed and possibly discriminatory.
NEWS
June 26, 2009
THE KING OF POP has gone to Neverland. Michael Jackson, age 50, died yesterday at a Los Angeles hospital yesterday after suffering a heart attack. The prevailing sentiment from callers on the many radio stations playing tributes last night was that they grew up with Michael Jackson. And those callers spanned all ages, a testament to his career longevity and a relevance few artists could claim. His death at such a young age is a shock; more complicated and more tragic is the death of someone who spent most of his life attempting to defy age and adulthood.
BUSINESS
November 14, 2008 | By Michael Klein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Fox Television Stations and NBC Local Media announced yesterday that they would pool news video in six cities in which they both own TV stations, starting with Philadelphia. The partnership between rivals, tested this spring and summer at Philadelphia's Fox29 and NBC10, acknowledges the economic forces buffeting big media companies and eliminates some redundancies in coverage. John Wallace, president of NBC Local Media, called it "smart from a journalistic perspective because newsrooms can be laser-focused on enterprise" reporting.
NEWS
October 8, 2008 | By KAREN WARRINGTON
BLACK TALK radio in Philadelphia is often an over-the-back-fence kind of conversation. For at least three decades, the African-American community has exchanged the latest news, gossip or social outrage daily on WDAS, WHAT or WURD. The strength of black talk is that it is an essentially private within-the-group dialogue in a public venue transmitted on a radio frequency. While the hosts changed over the years, many of the callers remained constant. The stalwarts, past and present, with their descriptive radio names include: Miss Ann (the Penn Fruit Lady)
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