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Radioactive Iodine

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NEWS
April 11, 2011 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com215-854-5255
The Philadelphia Water Department announced Monday that it is enhancing its testing procedures and reviewing its treatment technology after federal environmental officials discovered radioactive iodine in the city's drinking water. The level of Iodine-131 found at the city's Queen Lane treatment plant is the highest of 23 sites in 13 states where the particles have appeared following the massive radiation leaks from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Lower levels were found at the city's other two plants.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Authorities are investigating why samples of drinking water from three sites in Philadelphia had a higher level of radioactive iodine than water in other cities. Levels of Iodine-131 found April 4 in samples from treated water at the Queen Lane, Baxter, and Belmont plants were considered within federal safety standards, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. The most common sources of Iodine-131 are nuclear reactors and weapons, but doctors also use it to diagnose and treat thyroid illnesses.
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Government officials have now confirmed what they strongly suspected a year ago: The radioactive iodine-131 in some of the region's waterways, also found in minute amounts in Philadelphia's drinking water, is coming from thyroid patients. After patients swallow the chemical in capsule or liquid form, some of it passes into their urine, which then enters the wastewater-treatment system and winds up in rivers that provide drinking water, the officials said. Philadelphia's water is safe, according to officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the state Department of Environmental Protection, the Philadelphia Water Department, and the city Department of Health.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Finding the source of radioactive iodine in Philadelphia's drinking water won't be easy. Many experts believe the most likely source is Iodine-131, used to treat thyroid cancer or a hyperthyroid. But nothing allows scientists and investigators to track an Iodine-131 sample to a specific medical facility or other source the way, say, they can follow the migratory path of a bird. "There is nothing that will tag that radioactive material from one location to the other," said John Keklak, director of radiation safety at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011 | Associated Press
TOKYO - Fears about contaminated seafood spread yesterday despite reassurances that radiation in the waters off Japan's troubled atomic plant pose no health risk, as the country's respected emperor consoled evacuees from the tsunami and nuclear emergency zone. While experts say radioactive particles are unlikely to build up significantly in fish, the seafood concerns in the country that gave the world sushi are yet another blemish for Brand Japan. It has already been hit by contamination of milk, vegetables and water, plus shortages of auto and tech parts after a massive quake and tsunami disabled a coastal nuclear power plant.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Speeding up the timetable for treatment, doctors at Bethesda Naval Hospital gave President Bush a radioactive iodine drink yesterday to cure the hyperthyroid condition that has been linked to his heart palpitations. After reviewing final test results, the physicians diagnosed Bush's condition as Graves' disease, the same illness that afflicts his wife, Barbara. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said the radioactive medication Bush drank would destroy his malfunctioning thyroid gland within a month.
NEWS
August 2, 1997 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer The Associated Press contributed to this report
We've been nuked. And tens of thousands of us may develop thyroid cancer as a result of fallout from nuclear weapons testing in Nevada in the 1950s, federal health officials said yesterday. Every man, woman and child born before the 1960s was hit by radioactive fallout wafting across the country from blasts at the Nevada Test Site, the National Cancer Institute said. But compared to some places, the Philadelphia area got off easy. Levels of fallout here were lower than the average dose across the country, while parts of Montana and Idaho took the heaviest hits.
NEWS
March 31, 2011 | By Mari Yamaguchi and Shino Yuasa, Associated Press
TOKYO - Fears about contaminated seafood spread Wednesday despite reassurances that radiation in the waters off Japan's troubled atomic plant posed no health risk. While experts say radioactive particles are unlikely to build up significantly in fish, the seafood concerns in the country that gave the world sushi are yet another blow to Brand Japan. It has already been hit by contamination of milk, vegetables, and water, plus shortages of auto and tech parts after a massive quake and tsunami disabled a coastal nuclear power plant.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By Shino Yuasa and Tomoko A. Hosaka, Associated Press
TOKYO - Nearly two weeks of rolling blackouts, distribution problems, and contamination fears prompted by a leaking, tsunami-damaged nuclear plant have left shelves stripped bare of some basic necessities in stores across Tokyo. Some people are even turning to the city's ubiquitous vending machines to find increasingly scarce bottles of water. At the source of the anxiety - the overheated, radiation-leaking nuclear plant - there was yet another setback Thursday as two workers were injured when they stepped into radiation-contaminated water.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 30, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Government officials have now confirmed what they strongly suspected a year ago: The radioactive iodine-131 in some of the region's waterways, also found in minute amounts in Philadelphia's drinking water, is coming from thyroid patients. After patients swallow the chemical in capsule or liquid form, some of it passes into their urine, which then enters the wastewater-treatment system and winds up in rivers that provide drinking water, the officials said. Philadelphia's water is safe, according to officials from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the state Department of Environmental Protection, the Philadelphia Water Department, and the city Department of Health.
NEWS
July 21, 2011 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three weeks after an earthquake and tsunami severely damaged Japan's Fukushima nuclear power plant, Lisa Daniels opened an e-mail with test results of river water samples from Southeastern Pennsylvania. It was just after lunch April 1. Nationwide, officials were testing rain, rivers, milk, and other substances to learn if radioactivity from the stricken plant was present. They'd seen it after Chernobyl, and now it was showing up nationwide, including in rainwater from a deluge in central Pennsylvania.
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Finding the source of radioactive iodine in Philadelphia's drinking water won't be easy. Many experts believe the most likely source is Iodine-131, used to treat thyroid cancer or a hyperthyroid. But nothing allows scientists and investigators to track an Iodine-131 sample to a specific medical facility or other source the way, say, they can follow the migratory path of a bird. "There is nothing that will tag that radioactive material from one location to the other," said John Keklak, director of radiation safety at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By WILLIAM BENDER, benderw@phillynews.com 215-854-5255
The Philadelphia Water Department announced yesterday that it is enhancing its testing procedures and reviewing treatment technology after federal environmental officials found radioactive iodine in the city's drinking water. The level of Iodine-131 found at the Queen Lane treatment plant is the highest of 23 sites in 13 states where the particles have appeared following the massive radiation leaks from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Lower levels were found at the city's two other plants.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
Authorities are investigating why samples of drinking water from three sites in Philadelphia had a higher level of radioactive iodine than water in other cities. Levels of Iodine-131 found April 4 in samples from treated water at the Queen Lane, Baxter, and Belmont plants were considered within federal safety standards, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. The most common sources of Iodine-131 are nuclear reactors and weapons, but doctors also use it to diagnose and treat thyroid illnesses.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011 | Associated Press
TOKYO - Fears about contaminated seafood spread yesterday despite reassurances that radiation in the waters off Japan's troubled atomic plant pose no health risk, as the country's respected emperor consoled evacuees from the tsunami and nuclear emergency zone. While experts say radioactive particles are unlikely to build up significantly in fish, the seafood concerns in the country that gave the world sushi are yet another blemish for Brand Japan. It has already been hit by contamination of milk, vegetables and water, plus shortages of auto and tech parts after a massive quake and tsunami disabled a coastal nuclear power plant.
NEWS
March 31, 2011 | By Mari Yamaguchi and Shino Yuasa, Associated Press
TOKYO - Fears about contaminated seafood spread Wednesday despite reassurances that radiation in the waters off Japan's troubled atomic plant posed no health risk. While experts say radioactive particles are unlikely to build up significantly in fish, the seafood concerns in the country that gave the world sushi are yet another blow to Brand Japan. It has already been hit by contamination of milk, vegetables, and water, plus shortages of auto and tech parts after a massive quake and tsunami disabled a coastal nuclear power plant.
NEWS
March 26, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
Besides the workers who have tried to cool the melting fuel at Fukushima, most residents within about 50 miles of the stricken nuclear plant have so far been exposed to radiation levels lower than those from a typical CT scan. With reports of contaminated food and water as far away as Tokyo, millions of people in Japan will be exposed to some radiation, and they will be closely watched. Experts expect that plant workers with the highest exposure will face an increased lifetime risk of cancer.
NEWS
March 25, 2011 | By Shino Yuasa and Tomoko A. Hosaka, Associated Press
TOKYO - Nearly two weeks of rolling blackouts, distribution problems, and contamination fears prompted by a leaking, tsunami-damaged nuclear plant have left shelves stripped bare of some basic necessities in stores across Tokyo. Some people are even turning to the city's ubiquitous vending machines to find increasingly scarce bottles of water. At the source of the anxiety - the overheated, radiation-leaking nuclear plant - there was yet another setback Thursday as two workers were injured when they stepped into radiation-contaminated water.
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