CollectionsRadiohead
IN THE NEWS

Radiohead

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2006 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Radiohead became one of the biggest rock bands in the world by rarely behaving the way other rock bands do. Thursday night at the Tower Theater, where the experimentalists from Oxford, England, debuted material on a keenly anticipated two-night stand that launched their North American tour, one encore selection was "No Surprises," a pretty ballad about Thom Yorke's favorite subjects: disillusionment and alienation. But of course Radiohead is full of surprises. After first appearing to be a one-hit wonder with 1993's "Creep," the fivesome (Yorke; multi-instrumentalist Jonny Greenwood and his bassist brother, Colin; drummer Phil Selway; and guitarist Ed O'Brien)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1997 | By Sara Sherr, FOR THE INQUIRER
Sci-fi Japanimation lit the room's video screens and electronic beats whirred on the sound system Sunday night as the British quintet Radiohead opened its Electric Factory show with "Fitter Happier," the only song on its latest CD, OK Computer, to be sung by . . . a computer. On the track, an eerie, processed voice recites an index of contentment indicators: "more productive, comfortable, not drinking too much, regular exercise at the gym (three days a week), getting on better with your associate employee contemporaries.
NEWS
August 20, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Radiohead doesn't make rock of the fist-in-the-air, we-are-the-champions variety. Its music lurks and broods in the shadows, and strives for connections more personal than the consensus-minded, big-backbeat attack known to transform a large gathering of strangers into a unified body. Its songs investigate dark-side emotions, rarely rallying the faithful with sloganeering affirmations, or anything as pedestrian as a sing-along. And yet, near the end of "Karma Police," during a spellbinding first encore set Monday night at the Tweeter Center, the quintet encouraged listeners to join lead vocalist Thom Yorke as he repeatedly intoned the song's closing refrain.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2000 | By Tom Moon, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Thom Yorke, the lead singer of Radiohead, sounds perpetually on the brink of spilling his guarded soul's secrets. On his band's widely hailed 1997 concept album, OK Computer, he appeared as a poster child for vague and formless discontent, caught up in the machinations of something large and potentially menacing and out of his control. His voice full of portent, his syllables halting and conflicted, he seemed almost overcome by the encrypted knowledge he was trying so valiantly to impart.
NEWS
August 13, 2008 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The title of the final song Radiohead played to finish off its dazzlingly dynamic show at the sold-out Susquehanna Bank Center on Tuesday spoke to the exactitude of the performance that preceded it: "Everything In Its Right Place. " Two hours earlier, Thom Yorke, the lead singer of the Oxford, England quintet, started off by singing, over a rubbery guitar line in "15 Step," from last year's In Rainbows, "How come I end up where I started? How come I end up where I went wrong?" Throughout the show, Yorke used his otherworldly voice to circle back on those themes of frustration and disconnection, and sometimes, out and out disaffection, as in "No Surprises," when he sang "Bring down the government/They don't speak for us," and was met with a rousing cheer.
NEWS
May 5, 2004 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
What does a rock band like Radiohead mean to the world? The critically revered five-piece from Oxford, England - known for its intense accounts of dislocation and techno-alienation - sells CDs in respectable, though not earth-shattering, numbers. It generates higher-than-average traffic on Internet bulletin boards, with fans endlessly parsing lyrics for hidden meanings. And it does solid business when it performs live, selling its share of T-shirts. Yet those marketplace indicators don't tell half the story.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2001 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
The work of self-indulgent artistes. Pretentious claptrap. Navel-gazing anti-music copped from Pink Floyd. Experimentation that leads nowhere. And that's just the start. Radiohead, which garnered near-universal praise for 1997's OK Computer, had never before encountered the kind of invective it received last fall for its dense, polarizing Kid A. Many hailed the CD as visionary, but not a few were bewildered. As it tested unusual electronic collages and fractured song forms, burying the voice and trimming back hooks, the musicians once hailed as rock's last original thinkers became an oddity, purveyors of garbled, intentionally impenetrable music.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2003 | By Tom Moon INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
Stop us if you've heard this one before: The Only Band in the Entire Universe That Matters at This Moment is coming to town. Ergo, if you care about rock - nay, the future of culture as we know it - you'll bear witness to (insert band name here) when it brings its cutting-edge music to (insert venue name) and demonstrates why critics call it "the best ever. " The lads of Radiohead, who play the Tweeter Center tomorrow, have been walking around with that burdensome title ever since 1997's disquieting OK Computer - a collection of surreal forays into a haunted inner landscape - spun the rock world sideways.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca and INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
There's a not a band in the world better at projecting postmillennial unease on a grand scale than Radiohead, the six-man art-rock outfit from Oxford, England, that spent a lovely late-spring evening in Camden on Wednesday making beautifully jittery music. All century long, ever since the career-redefining Kid A in 2000, Radiohead has been turning inward, relying on fractured polyrhythms, ambient textures, and Thom Yorke's elegantly alienated vocals to convey a sense of sublime digital-age anxiety.
NEWS
February 22, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Radiohead are masters of surprise. Going back to Kid A , the 2000 album that followed 1997's prog-rock landmark OK Computer with a left turn into ambient-electronic experimentation, the acclaimed British quintet have grown practiced at turning every release into an event that catches their fan base unawares. Last time around, with 2007's In Rainbows , the Thom Yorke-fronted band of Oxford townies got everybody's attention by releasing their music - at first, anyway - as a pay-what-you-wish download, embracing a music-should-be-free ethos they could well afford, having already spent a decade selling millions of CDs and packing arenas.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Dan DeLuca, Music Critic
Releasing your super-secret, heretofore not-known-to-exist album with absolutely no advance notice to surprise the internet and snap the music world to attention? That's soooo early 2016, like something Kendrick Lamar would have done - and did, with his unexpected Untitled Unmastered - way back in March, for goodness sake. The new strategy, it seems, for fans trying to to figure out how they can actually listen to new music by their favorite acts, is a little different. Instead of ambushing them out of the blue - as Beyoncé did in 2013 when she revealed her previous, self-titled album with a midnight Instagram post - you tease with a hint beforehand, so fans can be ready to convene for a virtual listening party.
NEWS
February 25, 2013
Various Artists Son of Rogues Gallery: Pirate Ballads, Sea Songs & Chanteys (Anti- ***1/2) It goes without saying that the double disc Son of Rogues Gallery , a 36-song compendium featuring Keith Richards and Tom Waits, Patti Smith, Michael Stipe and Courtney Love, Johnny Depp, Macy Gray, Dr. John, and many others, is a rambling, shambling affair. The sequel to 2006's Rogues Galley , the current seafaring collection once again has Philadelphia-raised longtime Saturday Night Live musical director and professional eclecticist Hal Willner acting as the musical captain of the ship.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2012 | By Sam Adams, For The Inquirer
The D.I.Y. ethic was a cornerstone of the punk and hardcore movements. But it's one thing to do it yourself when you're playing to a few dozen people in a friend's living room, and another when you're eight years into your career with more than 300,000 albums sold. The Doylestown quintet Circa Survive, who will play Friday and Saturday at Union Transfer to celebrate the release of their fourth album, Violent Waves , on their own label, have come to self-sufficiency after two albums on the independent label Equal Vision Records and a third, 2010's Blue Sky Noise , released on Atlantic.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca and INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
It was tough to tell whether you were at a theme park or a pop concert Thursday at the Wells Fargo Center, where Coldplay was playing the first of back-to-back nights. The Chris Martin-led British quartet was up on stage — and in the crowd — playing music focused on its candy-colored fifth album, Mylo Xyloto (2011), mixed with ingratiating hits from throughout its dozen-year career. But the show was as much about the exploding bursts of color filling up the room as it was about the soaring melodic soft-rock that was being brought to life by pianist-guitarist-singer Martin and his bandmates, Guy Berryman, Jonny Buckland, and Will Champion.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | Daily News Staff Report
MUSIC   Hooks Galore San Diego-spawned singer-songwriter Greg Laswell serves a poppy, propellant, piano-centric sound that echoes dramatically down the ear canals. His 2012 "Landline" album has been winning favorable comparisons to Coldplay and Radiohead at their most anthemic. Having notable female counterparts like Sara Bareilles and Ingrid Michaelson serving sirenlike backup parts has also perked up interest. Another album guest, Elizabeth Ziman, is Laswell's current tour opener with her band the Catapult.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2012 | Howard Gensler
Last summer's concert catastrophe occurred when Sugarland's stage collapsed in August, killing six, when a storm thrashed Indiana. On Saturday disaster struck in Toronto, where the stage collapsed before a Radiohead concert, killing Scott Johnson, the band's drum technician, who was trapped under the rubble. Three other people were injured. Officials from the Ontario Ministry of Labor searched through the wreckage for clues to the cause of the collapse. They were also investigating whether safety regulations and standards were followed and if staff were properly trained.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2012 | By Dan DeLuca and INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
There's a not a band in the world better at projecting postmillennial unease on a grand scale than Radiohead, the six-man art-rock outfit from Oxford, England, that spent a lovely late-spring evening in Camden on Wednesday making beautifully jittery music. All century long, ever since the career-redefining Kid A in 2000, Radiohead has been turning inward, relying on fractured polyrhythms, ambient textures, and Thom Yorke's elegantly alienated vocals to convey a sense of sublime digital-age anxiety.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012
Radiohead The King of Limbs came as a surprise last year, not so much for its music, which was an extension of the moody, electronic art rock Radiohead has perfected, refined, then perfected again, but because it dropped with little advance notice: all of a sudden, a new Radiohead album. The record wasn't a groundbreaking statement like OK Computer or Kid A , but it was still one of last year's best, full of tense abstractions and abstract tensions. For this tour, the band has been playing nearly all of The King of Limbs each night, so expect a self-contained and textured set, although Thom Yorke will still twitch and jitter; guitarist extraordinaire Jonny Greenwood will still impress - he's the least flashy guitar hero in rock-and-roll.
NEWS
February 22, 2011 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Radiohead are masters of surprise. Going back to Kid A , the 2000 album that followed 1997's prog-rock landmark OK Computer with a left turn into ambient-electronic experimentation, the acclaimed British quintet have grown practiced at turning every release into an event that catches their fan base unawares. Last time around, with 2007's In Rainbows , the Thom Yorke-fronted band of Oxford townies got everybody's attention by releasing their music - at first, anyway - as a pay-what-you-wish download, embracing a music-should-be-free ethos they could well afford, having already spent a decade selling millions of CDs and packing arenas.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2011 | By JONATHAN TAKIFF, staff
Rock gods Radiohead reign supreme, but new releases from Adele, Lauren Pritchard and Steve Riley also vie for attention. THE FUTURE OF MUSIC: Like its 2007 predecessor "In Rainbows," Radiohead's "The King of Limbs" (TBD Records, B+) is almost as interesting a marketing project as it is an album. The set was first announced in a band Tweet on Valentine's Day. It went on sale - online only at www.thekingoflimbs.com - last Friday, one day earlier than originally planned, priced at $9 in MP3 form and $14 as higher-quality WAV files.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|