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Radiology

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NEWS
October 8, 1992 | By Pauline Pinard Bogaert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Physician Henrietta Kotlus Rosenberg of Merion has been named chair of the department of radiology at Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. Before coming to the medical center, she was a professor of radiology at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She received a medical degree from the Medical College of Pennsylvania and completed a pediatric internship at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children in Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 7, 2001 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Milton Metzman, 72, of Cherry Hill, a longtime chairman of the radiology department at Kennedy Memorial Hospitals-University Medical Center/Stratford, died at home Friday of complications from a series of strokes. He had lived in Cherry Hill for more than 30 years. Dr. Metzman, a physician, led the radiology department from 1968 to 1996, when he retired. He also had a private practice in Stratford. Dr. Metzman expanded the department from a one-person operation to one that included specialists in different areas of radiology, said Louis A. Papa, who was Dr. Metzman's personal physician.
NEWS
January 8, 1991 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Dr. Paul T. Lloyd, a pioneer in osteopathic radiology, died Saturday. He was 94 and lived in Wayne. Lloyd is credited with being the first to bring the concept of radiation therapy to the osteopathic profession and served as a consultant to osteopathic radiologists throughout the country. He also was an innovator in breast cancer screening programs. He initiated routine X-rays for breast cancer screenings as early as 1930. In 1934 he introduced a post-treatment "follow-up" program for cancer patients, recommending that the follow-up be extended from five years to the patient's lifetime.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dr. Howard Pollack, an internationally known expert in radiology and urology and professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, died Wednesday at Abington Memorial Hospital. Dr. Pollack, 72, helped develop the use of imaging techniques such as ultrasound to diagnose and treat diseases of the urinary and reproductive systems and was a pioneer in using lithotripsy, or shock waves, to crush kidney stones. A longtime resident of Cheltenham who lived more recently in Jenkintown, Dr. Pollack edited the textbook that is considered the bible of the field of uroradiology, and doctors from across the world called on him for advice.
NEWS
August 31, 1989 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Dr. Geraldine E. Hamilton of Drexel Hill has been named chairwoman of the department of diagnostic radiology at Mercy Catholic Medical Center in Darby. Hamilton will direct the department's work at the medical center's two hospitals, Fitzgerald Mercy in Darby and Misericordia Division in West Philadelphia. Hamilton, an associate professor of radiology at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, has a bachelor's degree from Chestnut Hill College and a medical degree from Women's Medical College in Philadelphia, now the Medical College of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Edwin L. Lame, 97, whose nearly 50-year medical career got off to a belated start, died of heart failure Sunday at home in Gladwyne. Dr. Lame had always dreamed of becoming a doctor, his family said, but to please his father he enrolled at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. "His father was an executive with R.D. Wood Co. in Florence, N.J.," said his son Anthony, "and he wanted him to follow in the iron-foundry business. In those days, sons usually did what the parents asked.
NEWS
January 9, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Paul T. Lloyd, 94, an osteopathic physician who pioneered the use of radiation therapy, died Saturday at his home in Wayne. Dr. Lloyd was professor emeritus of radiology at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM), where he had been teaching since 1924. As early as 1930, Dr. Lloyd initiated routine X-ray screenings at the college to detect breast cancer. In 1934, he introduced a post-treatment follow-up program for cancer patients. "He was the father of radiology here at PCOM," said Dr. Albert D'Alonzo, chief of the college's division of cardiology.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Where most radiologists look at an ultrasound and see a bladder indented by a very large prostate gland, Sue Summerton saw the Liberty Bell. What to most might appear as a gallbladder with a couple gallstones were, to Summerton, the face and mile-high hair of Marge Simpson. That bicornuate uterus? The letter "Y. " What's a doctor to do? Summerton turned her unusual point of view into a business, Xray Artistry, reveling more, she says, in the laughs her work elicits than the revenue it generates.
NEWS
December 4, 2004 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Victor Kremens, 86, of Wyncote, a retired radiologist who helped develop X-rays to detect breast cancer, died Thursday of kidney failure at Abington Memorial Hospital. In the 1950s Dr. Kremens assisted Jacob Gershon-Cohen, head of radiology at Albert Einstein Medical Center, in the pioneering of mammography, an X-ray technique to diagnose breast cancer. In the 1960s, Dr. Kremens established the radiology department at Rolling Hill Hospital in Cheltenham. He maintained a practice on North Broad Street in Philadelphia and later in Elkins Park before retiring in the 1980s.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wallace T. Miller Sr., 81, of East Falls, who rose from poverty in Appalachia to become one of the most accomplished radiologists of his generation, died Sunday, June 23, at his home of metastatic lymphoma. Dr. Miller was known as an outstanding clinical radiologist and charismatic teacher during the half-century he served on the staff of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He took top honors in his field, including the 1997 Gold Medal Award from the Radiological Society of North America, and won nearly every accolade possible for his work at Penn's medical school.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 22, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
In 2002, Dr. Murray Schwartz worked very briefly as a radiologist at Valley Hospital in Palmer, Alaska. He was there only from July 1 to 19 and from Sept. 16 to 21, with an August stint at a hospital in Anchorage. But Palmer convinced him that he had made the right decision to work in Alaska, even for only weeks. "He stayed at a little hotel in Palmer," a son, Jason, said. "And he would walk out the front door of the hotel and there were the mountains. He loved it there. " On Thursday, Aug. 18, Dr. Schwartz, 72, of Cherry Hill, a radiologist who from 2000 to 2008 worked brief terms at several hospitals in Kentucky, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, died of complications from pneumonia at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center in Camden.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, Staff Writer
Where most radiologists look at an ultrasound and see a bladder indented by a very large prostate gland, Sue Summerton saw the Liberty Bell. What to most might appear as a gallbladder with a couple gallstones were, to Summerton, the face and mile-high hair of Marge Simpson. That bicornuate uterus? The letter "Y. " What's a doctor to do? Summerton turned her unusual point of view into a business, Xray Artistry, reveling more, she says, in the laughs her work elicits than the revenue it generates.
NEWS
January 6, 2016 | By Walter F. Naedele, Staff Writer
When he was growing up near 17th and Diamond Streets in North Philadelphia in the 1920s and 1930s, Conrad M. Brahin lived in the apartment above a pharmacy and soda counter owned by his parents. The pharmacy was run by his father, Samuel, an immigrant from Kiev, in what is now Ukraine, who had graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. "He ran deliveries for my grandfather [and] encountered some situations where people were trying to rob him," Conrad Brahin's son, Jason, said.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wallace T. Miller Sr., 81, of East Falls, who rose from poverty in Appalachia to become one of the most accomplished radiologists of his generation, died Sunday, June 23, at his home of metastatic lymphoma. Dr. Miller was known as an outstanding clinical radiologist and charismatic teacher during the half-century he served on the staff of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He took top honors in his field, including the 1997 Gold Medal Award from the Radiological Society of North America, and won nearly every accolade possible for his work at Penn's medical school.
NEWS
June 7, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sister Rita Joseph Knapp, 98, a former radiology supervisor at two Philadelphia hospitals, died Sunday, June 2, of cardiovascular failure in Assisi House in Aston, Delaware County. She had been a professed member of the Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia for 77 years. Born in Philadelphia, Sister Rita Joseph graduated from St. Anthony Commercial School. She entered the convent in 1933, completed her high school education in the novitiate school, and professed her first vows in 1936.
NEWS
June 6, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
THE FAMILY OF Dr. Sidney Wallace ran out of words in trying to describe him: "Physician, scholar, author, teacher, researcher, inventor, businessman, painter, sculptor, cartoonist, songwriter, singer. " And, oh yes, "outstanding husband, father and grandfather. " It was not hard for those who knew Sidney Wallace to believe that one man could embody all these splendid characterizations. Add one more accomplishment: He once cured himself of kidney cancer. Sidney Wallace, a pioneer in the field of interventional radiology, developer of a cancer drug and an artist and musician in what spare time he allowed himself, died May 25 of cancer.
NEWS
September 15, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph J. Darby Jr., 64, of Upper Gwynedd, a biomedical technician who helped develop the diagnostic ultrasound unit at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, died Monday, Sept. 10, of liver failure in the hospice unit at Abington Memorial Hospital. "Joe was at the helm of technical operations for the division of diagnostic ultrasound in the department of radiology," Barry B. Goldberg, a professor of radiology who directs that Jefferson division, said. "Joe has worked with me for 30 years," Goldberg said.
NEWS
June 14, 2012 | By Laura Ungar, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Isabel Doran is only 4 years old, but she's already had about 15 CT scans - and every one comes with a dose of radiation. "I think there's always that part of you that thinks it's too much," said her mother, Veronica Doran of Burke, Va. Doran is glad the scans have allowed doctors at Children's National Medical Center to monitor Isabel's progress while they treat her kidney cancer. But she's worried about the long-term effects of the scans, which could put Isabel at risk for another cancer later.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Simon M. Berger, 99, of Wyndmoor, a radiologist who did pioneering research on using X-rays to diagnose breast cancer, died of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on Saturday, Jan. 7, at home. In 1951, Dr. Berger and Dr. Jacob Gershon-Cohen received a grant from the National Institutes of Health to investigate the pathology and the technical requirements for breast cancer detection with X-rays at Albert Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia. The two conducted a course in 1955 on mammography, which uses low doses of radiation to produce an image of the breast on film.
NEWS
December 13, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jill Townsend Red, 76, of Malvern, a nurse and conservationist, died of nonsmoking lung cancer Thursday, Dec. 8, at home. In 1970, Mrs. Red and her husband, Donald E., moved to Radnor when he joined the radiology staff of Lankenau Hospital. He later chaired the radiology department and was president of the medical staff. While her husband pursued his medical career, Mrs. Red raised four sons, worked as a nurse, and became involved in the community. She and other activists fought to protect the former 46-acre Zantzinger estate in Radnor from development.
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