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NEWS
June 14, 1988 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / AKIRA SUWA
When the temperature climbs to 93 degrees, as it did yesterday, the body wants to shut down, head for water, or both. Demonstrating the pleasure of inertial drift are Carl Deppenschmidt of Philadelphia, above, and 5-year-old Kiel O'Donnell, seen floating at Lake Worth Park in Lindenwold.
NEWS
May 3, 2005 | By Stephanie L. Arnold INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A 13-year-old boy died yesterday afternoon after he and two cousins went into Chester Creek aboard a small plastic inflatable pool and their craft overturned, plunging the boys into the chilly, muddy, debris-filled waters. Chester City Fire Commissioner James Johnson said the tragedy began about 4:45 p.m., when the victim and his cousins, ages 14 and 15, entered the creek near Ninth and Penn Streets. "They were using the swimming pool as a small raft and the weight, of course, gave way and capsized," Johnson said.
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
The morning after he thought he would die, Alexi Herrera made it to America. Paddling 120 miles from Cuba, Herrera arrived yesterday in Florida waters, crowded with his brother, cousin and friend onto a haphazard raft made of no more than two tractor-tire inner tubes and two patches of canvas. The four men pushed off from their poverty-stricken homeland at 2 a.m. Sunday. After four days of rowing without even a compass, as sharks circled and the sun baked and their food sank and their hope vanished, the weary men became the most recent arrivals in a new wave of Cuban boat refugees.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"The Cure" is a loose, contemporary variation of "Huckleberry Finn," but its subject isn't racism - it's AIDS. In this contemporary story, a boy and his AIDS-afflicted friend decide to raft down the Mississippi River to Louisiana, where they believe they can find a miraculous antidote to the incurable disease. It's false hope born of youthful ignorance. Erik (Brad Renfro of "The Client") reads in a supermarket tabloid that a bayou scientist has developed a cure for AIDS. Erik is neither old enough nor savvy enough to distrust lurid tabloids, so he convinces his sick friend Dexter (Joseph Mazzello)
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | By Richard R. Rogers, Special to The Inquirer
What a collection of humanity we were. Twenty or so homicide detectives with their wives and families, ready to take on the notorious Kern River. Originally, the idea was one of those momentary thoughts that resulted in a phone call and from there worked up to a trip. Now, here we were, settled in our quaint little guest room at Kernville Lodge. Tonight we would party, and tomorrow we'd conquer the mighty Kern. Piece of cake. Anyone with knowledge of the Kern and listening to our banter that night might have smiled smugly at our lofty disdain for the river.
NEWS
October 29, 1989 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Staff Writer
The upper Yangtze River careens down from its high mountain sources, often whipping itself up into a potentially lethal lather in such places as Tiger's Leap Gorge. Small wonder this first leg of China's principal river has taken the lives of so many who have tried to raft it. Small wonder they call it the Dragon. And small wonder it should attract Richard Bangs and Christian Kallen, whitewater rafters who earlier co-authored Rivergods: Exploring the World's Great Wild Rivers. The two were not the first adventurers to raft the Dragon.
NEWS
October 2, 1996 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Working as a team, eight very young sailors pushed their homemade raft - made of recycled oil drums, donated wood, and a piece of outdoor carpeting - into the Schuylkill yesterday for a short cruise on a beautiful fall day. While it looked as though they were having fun, the explorers, ages 4 through 10, were not playing hooky. The raft was their classroom as it floated out on its tether from a boat ramp at Valley Forge National Historical Park. They are home schoolers, and building a raft that worked was one of their educational projects, said Lorrie Strohsacker, assistant director of Live & Learn, a Rosemont-based learning support center for home schoolers.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | By Monica Rhor, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jose Raul DelaRosa plotted his escape from Cuba for almost two years. He learned all he could about raft-building, grilling the families of people who had sailed out before him. He scoured the black market for plastic foam, inner tubes and rope. He met secretly with eight friends at a remote house where they stashed their vessel-under-construction. They spent 22,000 pesos for materials - more than DelaRosa makes in a year. Then, last Thursday after nightfall, the nine men crept softly along the shore line, jumped into the water, crowded aboard their homemade raft and headed toward the Straits of Florida.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Kathy Hacker, Inquirer Staff Writer
At 13, Angela Stoner Carder learned to fight. A spunky kid, she became very good very fast, in some ways almost a match for the bully in her life. Relentless. That was cancer. That was Angie. A lot of the rounds she lost. Beginning in her first year of junior high, the cancer hobbled her. Later it took her leg, and her hip, and half of her pelvis. It took her from school and friends, took her plans for a nursing career, took even that corner-of-the-mind fancy of some day going to Nashville to sing country.
NEWS
August 15, 1992 | By Pam Belluck, Karen Quinones Miller and Thomas Turcol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS The Associated Press and Inquirer correspondent William H. Sokolic contributed to this report
Their new luxury yacht went down so fast that they said they had to jump ship with little more than their underwear, lifejackets and a round rubber raft. It was half past midnight yesterday when the six men abandoned the 121- foot, $10 million Lady Anna - one of the world's largest sport fishing vessels - 94 miles off Cape May in tempestuous seas. The aluminum-hulled ship, reportedly bulletproof and fitted with 24-karat gold-plated hinges, sank in five minutes, the Coast Guard said.
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TRAVEL
July 7, 2014 | By Phil Goldsmith, For The Inquirer
When our friends Iris and Howard asked whether we wanted to join them on a weeklong whitewater rafting and camping trip in the Grand Canyon in honor of her 70th birthday, my wife and I jumped at the chance. Iris is a great planner. We aren't. So we wouldn't have to do anything but show up. Still, my wife Essie had reservations about the trip. And for good reason. Camping, like planning, is not our forte. The only time we went camping was three decades ago with a group of friends.
NEWS
March 17, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drew Ferrara and Connie Kaminski expected flood-insurance premiums to rise in parts of Yardley, a Bucks County river town swamped by three major floods between September 2004 and June 2006. But not by 800 percent. When the insurance bill arrived in December for their two-story real estate office near the Delaware River, they saw premiums jump from about $3,000 a year to nearly $27,000. "The absurdity of it was shocking," Ferrara said. "Who can afford to pay this type of insurance?"
NEWS
January 19, 2014 | By Kate Harman, For The Inquirer
Missing is contagious. That's what coach Ashley Jones often reminds the members of her Central girls' basketball team. It's a phrase that resonated with senior guard Kayla Henderson. The idea is to be mindful of the shots you take during a game - to be careful with the basketball on every possession. The Lancers didn't have to worry about missing many shots on Friday afternoon, as Central hit eight three-pointers on its way to a 55-46 victory over Public League rival Northeast.
NEWS
July 27, 2013
By Todd R. Nelson Every so often, it's good to let yourself drift, to just follow the current and see where it takes you. It's good to leave an hour, a morning, a day unplanned; to enter open space and time and invite its effects. Sadly, it's something we hardly give ourselves permission for any more. The artist Paul Klee spoke of drawing as "taking a line out for a walk. " We can see his art as such an exploration, following a random thought, or just drifting. Look what comes of it: something fresh and new. This is what summer is for, I like to think.
NEWS
December 19, 2012 | By Joelle Farrell, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - The Assembly approved a slew of job-creation bills during its final voting session of the year. Gov. Christie, a Republican, typically refuses to talk about legislation until he signs or vetoes it. But at a news conference last month, Christie said he would prefer a tax cut to "more programs. " He also has said that he would not approve spending bills that are not part of budget negotiations. The jobs package would cost about $20 million, according to Democratic Assembly leaders.
TRAVEL
December 16, 2012 | By Brian Remondino, For The Inquirer
Peering over the edge of a jagged, 30-foot cliff into the calm, pristine waters of the Mediterranean Sea, my stomach twisted and turned like a roller coaster. I was frozen. Unable to take a leap of faith, I preoccupied myself by reflecting on the unforgettable chain of events that culminated with this epic test of will in the beautiful town of Positano, Italy. As I stepped off the tour bus, the blissful landscape of the Amalfi Coast overwhelmed my senses. Breathing in the fresh sea air, I strolled through the scene of an Italian postcard: Tiers of pastel blue, red, and yellow houses lined the mountainside, radiant violet flowers dangled from the overhang above the cobblestone walkway, and the welcoming, crystal-clear waters of the Mediterranean enchanted me like a horde of sirens.
NEWS
May 30, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
OCEAN CITY - Memorial Day at the Jersey Shore is usually the perfect time to dip your toe in the water. But with Fourth of July-like weather conditions across the region - and warmer-than-usual ocean temperatures - many visitors and residents got right back into the swim of things. "We never get to go in the water this early. It's usually too cold. This is great," said 8-year-old Ben Cheever, of Maple Shade, as he exited Hoy's 5 & 10 at 34th & West with a brand-new canvas raft.
SPORTS
November 15, 2011 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bad news keeps coming for the Eagles. Wide receiver Jeremy Maclin emerged from Sunday's game with a sprain in his AC joint - in his shoulder - and what coach Andy Reid described as a "slight" hamstring strain. Cornerback Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie has a high ankle sprain and torn ligaments and was in a walking boot, and offensive lineman King Dunlap suffered a concussion. If Maclin misses time he would represent the most significant loss. He leads the team in receptions and receiving yards.
NEWS
September 26, 2011 | By Maya Rao, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Planning on a nose job? New Jersey senators want you to undergo surgery in-state. They will break from campaigning to vote on a bill Monday to phase out a 2004 tax on plastic surgery that some complain has driven people out of state for cosmetic procedures. That legislation is one of more than a dozen bills up for a vote aimed at bolstering the state's struggling economy. Others would give businesses tax breaks and offer loans to spur job growth at a time when New Jersey's unemployment rate has soared to 9.4 percent.
FOOD
July 21, 2011 | By Ashley Primis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jason Varney was working hard to capture the perfect, not-so-perfect photo from Guapos Tacos food truck one day last week. His assistant, Caroline Kavit, sat on a low wall in JFK Plaza, delicately holding a taco. "A little lower," Varney directed. "No, it's not right. " He stepped back. "How would I eat a taco?" Kavit asked. "Ah, more like this," she turned it vertically, and paused for a bite that she'd never take. At least not until Varney got what he wanted. Salsa dripped down her fingers, onto the crumpled parchment paper around the taco.
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