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Rage

SPORTS
January 5, 1998 | For the Daily News
If nothing else, the Rage will know this Friday's American Basketball League opponent very well. That's because they will play the Columbus Quest, a team that beat them, 65-60, at the Palestra yesterday. The Quest also beat them, 77-61, in Columbus, Ohio, on Saturday. With no games until Friday in Columbus, the Rage may be able to obtain a much-needed commodity: sleep. The Rage, which also played last Friday (a loss to Colorado), could use a bit of a rest. "This was each team's third game in 72 hours and the effects showed for both teams," Rage coach Lisa Boyer said.
SPORTS
November 21, 1998 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When the Rage's woeful 13-31 season finally expired last March, Taj McWilliams wanted out. "I asked [ABL officials] to just get me somewhere else," she said recently. "But then Anne Donovan became the coach and Tee [Teresa Edwards] came to us, and I knew things were going to get better. " The transformation of the Rage continues, and McWilliams was a major part of it last night. The 6-foot-4 forward and center scored 11 of her 21 points in the fourth quarter as the Rage defeated the expansion Nashville Noise, 80-72, before a crowd of 2,020 in the Nashville Municipal Auditorium.
SPORTS
January 10, 1998 | By Aaron Portzline, FOR THE INQUIRER
By now, the Rage must be sick and tired of the Columbus Quest. Three games, three losses and three franchise records for futility against the Quest. And all since Jan. 3. Last night's 69-48 loss to Columbus had a familiar feel for the Rage, who established franchise lows for points scored in each of the three games. But this showing was especially distressing. The Rage committed a franchise-record 30 turnovers and scored just eight points in the second quarter and 10 in the third, falling behind by 53-35 going into the fourth.
SPORTS
August 21, 1997 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Philadelphia Rage's home opener will take place on Oct. 19 at the Palestra, where Dawn Staley's team will meet the Atlanta Glory at 6 p.m., according to the American Basketball League schedule announced yesterday. Atlanta features two 1996 Olympic stars in Teresa Edwards, a four-time medalist who will make her debut as the team's head coach this season, and Katrina McClain. The season opener for the Rage, who moved here last month from Richmond, Va., will be held on Oct. 17 in Columbus, Ohio.
SPORTS
February 18, 1998 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
For the first time in her career, Dawn Staley is thinking about the end of basketball. "I'm getting old," said the Rage's 27-year-old point guard. "I'd like to do other things. I can definitely see the end. " Staley doesn't mean next year. Or even the year after. There are, she says, at least three more seasons and one more dream left in her. She wants another Olympic gold medal, like the one she brought home from the 1996 Summer Games in Atlanta. But as Staley nears the completion of her American Basketball League contract, her thoughts turn toward her work with children and what she wants to do with the rest of her life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 1999 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's defiance that drives Rage Against the Machine, the insistence that life is a fight against oppression to be waged every waking moment. "There'll be no shelter here," Zack de la Rocha screeched at the First Union Spectrum on Monday as guitarist Tom Morello, bassist Tim Commerford, and drummer Brad Wilk thundered in unison behind him. "The frontline is everywhere. " For the members of Rage - touring behind their impressively relentless new The Battle of Los Angeles - nothing is so important as taking a public stand for what they believe in. So when the band came to the hometown of death-row inmate Mumia Abu-Jamal, for whom it organized a benefit concert in North Jersey in January, the fallout was predictable: Local law enforcement railed against the group's support of Abu-Jamal, convicted of killing Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner in 1981, and Rage didn't back down an inch.
SPORTS
October 17, 1997 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Who will score the first field goal? Grab the first rebound? Make the first foul shot? Everything the Rage players do tonight will be a first as Philadelphia's new women's pro basketball team - led by the home-grown Olympic gold medalist, Dawn Staley - takes the court at 7 against the reigning American Basketball League champion Columbus Quest. The Rage, coached by Lisa Boyer, will play their home opener at the Palestra at 7 p.m. Sunday against the Atlanta Glory. Based last season in Richmond, Va., the Rage lost the league's first championship series, three games to two, to the Quest.
SPORTS
October 27, 1997 | By Mel Greenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The surging Portland Power short-circuited the Rage in the fourth quarter last night at the Palestra to hand the locals their first defeat, 74-67, in the American Basketball League. The winners (5-0) continued to play like ABL champs instead of league chumps, which they were last season. Portland went midway into December last year before getting win number five. This victory over the Rage snapped last season's 0-10 road record against Eastern Conference teams. ABL all-star Natalie Williams, a 6-foot-2 center who was the dominant post player in the league last season, continued to be an offensive and defensive force last night with 24 points and 14 rebounds for the Power.
NEWS
October 15, 2012 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Allow this humble narrator to correct a misapprehension held by listeners who don't know Swans intimately. Michael Gira's shifting membership noise rock ensemble does not embrace doom or gloom in its sound or lyrics. During its nearly 30 years of an on-and-off existence, there's certainly been dread, existential or otherwise, in Gira's incendiary words, his handsomely low vocals, and his thunderously looming sound-scapes. But there are God, love, and bright shards of luminescence in the bandleader's dense, abrasive shadow play as well.
NEWS
February 27, 2001
Anyone with that much "rage" (Cover story Feb. 22) needs professional help. After all, Eminem can afford the best psychiatrists, psychologists or psychotherapists. What has our society come to when someone like this can become wealthy and admired? TERRY M. CALLEN Gloucester City, N.J. Eminem is a purveyor of hatred, intolerance and violence. His lyrics against homosexuals and women are not the message we need sent to young people. Although some will not be affected, one or two may use these lyrics as justification for gay-bashing, rape and sexual assault.
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