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NEWS
April 25, 2000 | by Chris Brennan, Daily News Staff Writer
The silver SEPTA train rolled into the Market-East Regional Rail Station but no one rushed aboard for a ride to the suburbs. The group gathered on the station platform yesterday morning was blocked by a ceremonial ribbon. This was SEPTA's 10th and final new Bombardier train. SEPTA General Manager Jack Leary stood next to the ribbon, touting the first new rail cars added to his agency's fleet in 13 years. The 10 cars, built in Plattsburg, N.Y., cost $12.9 million. With a quick snip of the ribbon, the crowd pushed aboard.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A flawed weld that attaches a plate to a key weight-bearing beam is at the root of SEPTA's rail-car woes, the company that built the cars acknowledged for the first time Tuesday. "The design of how it was welded and the weld itself are in question," Andrew Hyer, marketing and business-development manager at Hyundai Rotem, said Tuesday in the company's first extended comments since cracks in the beams forced SEPTA to pull one-third of its rail cars from service. "How we decide to weld the material may make all the difference," Hyer said.
NEWS
January 17, 1987 | By TOM OPDYKE, Daily News Staff Writer
Four passenger rail cars at SEPTA's Paoli repair yard show signs of contamination by a suspected carcinogen, but not at levels that would be immediately hazardous, the Environmental Protection Agency said yesterday. The EPA on Dec. 6 took so-called wipe samples of the train car's interiors as part of its ongoing investigation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) contamination at the rail yard and its efforts to bring the contamination within acceptable levels. The cars were being serviced at the repair shop, where high levels of PCBs have been found in work areas.
NEWS
June 1, 1993 | by Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
SEPTA is on the verge of the biggest equipment deal in its 25-year history - a fleet of 222 cars for the Market-Frankford El, carrying a price tag of at least $285 million. But it's still unclear who will get the contract - ABB Traction, an Elmira, N.Y., subsidiary of a giant European engineering conglomerate, which submitted the low bid; or AEG Westinghouse, an alliance between Pittsburgh-based Westinghouse and a huge German firm. At a board meeting scheduled for Thursday, SEPTA is expected to decide whether ABB Traction will land the contract, after months of political turmoil and sniping between the two companies.
NEWS
October 6, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
Peter V. Young of Ardmore has been promoted to manager of vehicle projects for SEPTA's rail equipment department. In his new position, Young is responsible for managing the $25 million overhaul of SEPTA's Silverlines II and III regional rail cars. Young has a bachelor's in engineering and a master's from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He joined SEPTA in 1968 as a transportation planner and has held several positions in the transportation, facilities and rail equipment departments.
NEWS
December 20, 1986 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
President Reagan, moving to counter congressional criticism that silo-based MX missiles were vulnerable to surprise attack, proposed yesterday that they be mounted on rail cars and moved around the country in case of a national emergency. The White House, as part of its modernization program for strategic nuclear forces, also announced that Reagan had authorized full-scale research and development to begin next year on a smaller, single-warhead strategic missile - the "Midgetman.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA is still waiting for its last seven rail cars from Hyundai Rotem Co., the South Korean manufacturer that is assembling the Silverliner V cars at a South Philadelphia factory. Hyundai Rotem, a subsidiary of the Hyundai automaker, is two years behind in completing delivery of 120 railcars ordered by SEPTA in 2006, and it faces millions of dollars in penalties. So far, SEPTA has received 113 of the cars, and 108 are in service on SEPTA routes. Five of the 113 are still being tested by SEPTA workers.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1996 | By Rosland Briggs, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Joseph Egan has worked in the rail industry for 17 years. But six years ago, he stepped out of the box and came up with an idea to make installing rail-car interiors more efficient. His idea became United Products Corp., which designs and packages materials used to outfit rail cars. The company has racked up $40 million in contracts from SEPTA and Amtrak. Recently, it also received the Industrial Excellence of the Year award from the Small Business Division of the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1986 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
The long shadows of twilight are falling across Transit America Inc., and both managers and union leaders say the odds are growing slimmer all the time that the troubled company will survive. The former rail car-building division of the Budd Co. and a Northeast Philadelphia institution for more than 50 years, Transit America has not won a new contract to make subway or long-distance rail cars since 1981. It's not as if the company hasn't tried. It has made 19 losing bids in that time.
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BUSINESS
July 23, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Anticipating traffic congestion from the Democratic National Convention and the SEPTA rail crisis, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission on Thursday passed an emergency order allowing Uber to temporarily put older cars on the road in Philadelphia's suburbs. The PUC voted 4-0 to lift restrictions requiring vehicles to be no older than 10 model years and have no more than 350,000 miles on the odometer. The order will allow Uber to deploy vehicles 15 model years and newer in its service in Bucks, Chester, Delaware, and Montgomery Counties.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
SEPTA's board chairman said Thursday that he has no second thoughts about buying the railcars that were recently pulled from service due to flaws found in one of their key components. "I was very comfortable with those guys being able to do the job," said Pasquale "Pat" Deon, referring to Hyundai Rotem, which received the contract to build 120 cars 10 years ago. Deon was board chairman at the time. Hyundai Rotem's railcars, the Silverliner V's, were delivered from 2010 to 2013 and this month were revealed to have fatigue cracks in equalizer beams, pieces that transfer weight from a car to the axles.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
A flawed weld that attaches a plate to a key weight-bearing beam is at the root of SEPTA's rail-car woes, the company that built the cars acknowledged for the first time Tuesday. "The design of how it was welded and the weld itself are in question," Andrew Hyer, marketing and business-development manager at Hyundai Rotem, said Tuesday in the company's first extended comments since cracks in the beams forced SEPTA to pull one-third of its rail cars from service. "How we decide to weld the material may make all the difference," Hyer said.
NEWS
July 17, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
SEPTA said Friday that it has leased 10 more rail cars to ease the crowding and delays that have plagued Regional Rail service during July. Schedules will be adjusted as of Monday to reflect the additional cars and make the best use of 18 leased cars already in service, the transit agency said. The crowding and delays are the result of cracks found in 115 of SEPTA's Silverliner V cars, which led the agency to pull all 120 cars from service two weeks ago. Officials say they hope to announce the results of their investigation into the cracks next week.
NEWS
July 16, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
In car after car, the trouble spot was the same: Hairline cracks along a joint where contractors had welded steel plates no bigger than an ice cream sandwich. On Thursday, SEPTA engineers offered the first public look at the cracks that sidelined 120 rail cars, upending the daily commute for thousands of passengers since early July. Still unclear is what caused the cracks, in most cases barely noticeable to the untrained eye, but officials said they hope to have an answer next week.
NEWS
July 8, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
The crack in SEPTA's rail cars has led Uber and the Philadelphia Parking Authority to heal their own breach. The city regulatory authority and the ride-hailing app giant have reached a temporary agreement to allow Uber to operate legally in Philadelphia. This comes just a week after state legislators said a bill that would have regulated the hail-by-app industry was too unwieldy to vote on before the summer recess. "It's taking away the stigma. We will make it legal here pending the legislation," said Vince Fenerty, the PPA's executive director.
NEWS
July 7, 2016 | By Joseph N. Distefano, Staff Writer
SEPTA's decision to ground the largest fleet of passenger railcars built by Hyundai Rotem's South Philadelphia factory didn't hurt the company's share price, which rose modestly in trading Monday on the Korea Stock Exchange. Hyundai Rotem's investors such as Vanguard Group are used to the political, scheduling, and quality-control disputes that often plague multinational military and transit-vehicle providers, such as Hyundai Rotem. Still, the headlines over the weekend - that inspectors are checking welds while passengers are herded into crowded, older trains, possibly for months - do not help the company's efforts, or the city's, to achieve the decades-old dream of growing its Weccacoe Avenue plant into a center for the U.S. passenger railcar business, and become a successor to long-vanished American manufacturers.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
With last year's crash in oil prices, less crude is moving by train, creating a surplus of idle rail cars that have become opportunistic vessels for some traders storing petroleum until prices recover. "There are a lot of people looking to do it," said Dennis A. Hoskins, managing partner of crude marketing at Energy Midstream, a Texas trading company that recently stored a light crude-oil derivative called condensate in rail cars for 15 days before shipping it to Canada. Though no government agency maintains data on the practice, the use of so-called rolling storage for crude oil does not appear to be widespread.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sticker shock is likely to keep three proposals to repurpose an unused rail right of way in the city from becoming reality, officials from the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission said Tuesday. The organization spent more than a year studying possible new uses for the 1.6-mile City Branch and concluded it would be difficult to raise the more than $100 million needed to repurpose the route. The City Branch is a former freight rail pathway running through a trench and tunnel system behind the Rodin Museum and the Barnes Foundation, past the Art Museum, terminating near 33rd Street and the Schuylkill River.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
IF YOU LIKE SEPTA, you're not alone. While the city school district is flunking financially and the police department is too often suspect, the region's transit authority appears to be on the right track. Ridership on SEPTA's 13 regional rail lines hit an all-time high of 37.4 million trips in fiscal year 2015, the period from July 1 2014 through June 30, SEPTA announced yesterday. It was the third year in a row a ridership record was set, according to numbers the authority provided to the Daily News . On the financial side, at the end of FY15, SEPTA marked its 16th consecutive year of operating with a balanced budget, said SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch.
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