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Rail Yard

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NEWS
November 12, 2010 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
At lunchtime on May 15, 2001, CSX Locomotive No. 8888 eased down tracks in a rail yard outside Toledo, Ohio. The engine known as "Crazy Eights" picked up speed as it pulled 47 freight cars, two of them loaded with toxic chemicals, south toward Columbus. Only no one was on board. Jon Hosfeld, a native of Mechanicsburg, Pa., was in the rail yard eating his lunch. He wasn't supposed to be there that day. Hosfeld, 52, ran a CSX yard 67 miles south in Kenton; he'd come north to deposit a carload of children and Ohio's lieutenant governor in Toledo for a program aimed at raising awareness about the dangers of rail crossings.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | By Claire Furia, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Tredyffrin supervisors said they would ask the EPA for an extension to the May 15 deadline for public comment on the $25 million plan to clean up soil, streams and buildings surrounding the Paoli rail yard Superfund site. The site is contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are believed to be linked to cancer. The EPA released plans in March to eliminate the PCBs at the site, which is owned by Amtrak and operated by SEPTA. "It just annoys me that the government is saying we're going to make a clean sweep of this," said Supervisor Herbert Greenwood.
BUSINESS
November 21, 1991 | By Jeff Brown, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Delaware River Port Authority is asking its rail and shipping consultant to take another look at whether the authority's new rail yard in South Philadelphia should be merged with an adjacent, privately run yard or whether the two should compete. The consultant, Jim Brennan of the Lexington, Mass., firm of Temple, Barker & Sloan, told the authority in the summer of 1990 that there might not be enough business to support both the multimillion-dollar DRPA yard and the private RailPort facility, which opened last summer.
NEWS
May 24, 2010 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
An 11-year-old boy who was electrocuted Saturday while climbing on a SEPTA commuter train had apparently walked into a North Philadelphia rail yard after leaving a neighborhood block party. Jewel Angelo, of the 300 block of West Albanus Street, was found dead on the ground near two trains at the Wayne Electric facility Sunday morning. He was apparently killed Saturday evening around 7 p.m. after he climbed atop a train car and touched a rooftop pantograph, which carries 11,000 volts of electricity from overhead lines to power the train, SEPTA assistant general manager James B. Jordan said Monday.
NEWS
November 24, 1993 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The theft of two high-explosive mortar rounds from a container on a flatbed railway car last week in South Philadelphia is under investigation by city police and the FBI, authorities said yesterday. Police said someone broke into a Sea/Land container between 7:50 p.m. last Wednesday and 12:35 a.m. Thursday while the rail car stood unattended in a rail yard at 1100 Terminal Ave. At 2:15 a.m. Thursday, the Police Department's South Detective Division was notified by Conrail authorities that the theft had occurred, police said.
NEWS
March 28, 1986 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Three federal health officials were admitted to the Paoli rail yard yesterday, ending a standoff between the federal government and SEPTA that began Wednesday when transit police barred a health evaluation team from the site. Two representatives from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and one from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) - each clad in protective clothing and shoes - entered the site shortly before 1 p.m. to begin evaluating the risk posed to workers by the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, a suspected carcinogen found at the site.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer (Staff writer Henry Goldman contributed to this article.)
Federal health officials trying to assess the risk posed to workers by high concentrations of a toxic chemical at the Paoli rail yard were barred from the site yesterday morning by SEPTA transit police. Representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency, the Centers for Disease Control and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health tried to enter a gate near a repair shop at the site about 9:30 a.m. but were turned away by armed SEPTA police officers, an EPA spokesman said.
NEWS
June 28, 1987 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
An Environmental Protection Agency official last week said he was optimistic about recent developments in the effort to clean up suspected carcinogens at the PCB-contaminated Paoli rail yard. "This should be a very welcome evening to the citizens of Paoli," William Steuteville, an EPA enforcement officer, told a handful of Paoli residents who had gathered Wednesday evening to hear an update on the controversial cleanup. Steuteville's enthusiasm stemmed from agreements the agency reached last month, after more than a year of negotiations, with the rail companies involved in litigation over the contamination.
NEWS
May 8, 1988 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathy Brown of Paoli was agitated. She pointed a finger and scowled toward various spots in her yard where, according to visiting environmental officials, high levels of toxic PCBs lurk in the soil. "I'm annoyed!" Brown cried Wednesday as she stood in the driveway of her West Central Avenue home next to the alleged source of the contamination - SEPTA's Paoli railroad maintenance yard. After all, said Brown, it was the second time that such news had been delivered to her. The first was more than two years ago. At that time, workers from the federal Environmental Protection Agency covered her yard with plastic.
NEWS
April 4, 1987 | By Reid Kanaley, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA yesterday announced work rules to lessen employees' exposure to toxic PCBs at its Paoli rail maintenance shop, where a federal agency found the worst levels yet of the suspected carcinogen on floors and other surfaces. In an eight-page document outlining the rules - which require employees to wear protective gloves, leave their work shoes at the rail yard, wash their hands after touching PCBs and eat lunch away from their work stations - SEPTA attorney C. Gary Wynkoop said the agency does not admit that a health hazard exists at the rail yard.
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NEWS
May 15, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
When John A. Fry arrived at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster 14 years ago as a candidate for college president, the first thing he saw was a shuttered linoleum manufacturing plant that loomed across the street. "If I get this job, that goes," he thought, wincing at the hulking mass of brick buildings and smokestacks that rose behind the college fitness center. "You couldn't think about a worse way to introduce a campus. " The notion was far from whimsical, considering it came from Fry, who was fresh off his pivotal role at the University of Pennsylvania in revitalizing its West Philadelphia neighborhood.
NEWS
May 9, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
A triangular tract of now mostly vacant land that was the engine of Merchantville's growth in the 19th century could be the key to the borough's future. "This is the last developable site in town," says Mayor Ted Brennan, a lawyer, a father of four, and an energetic proponent of a renewed effort to strengthen the Camden County suburb's somewhat faded heart. "We want to build something that will stand the test of time," adds the mayor, whose father, Patrick, served in the same role from 1995 until 2006.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Amtrak and its development partners want to build a new underground concourse linking 30th Street Station with SEPTA's subways and trolleys as the first step in a 35-year plan for the area. The concourse, to be topped by a skylight and lined with shops along its 250-foot span, would be completed during the first half of the 2020s, according to a draft of the 30th Street Station District Plan to be released during an open house at the station Wednesday from 4 to 7 p.m. The draft is the latest stage in a $5.25 million study, nearing completion after two years, of plans for the station.
NEWS
January 8, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Transforming the lackluster 175 acres roughly bounded by the Schuykill and Walnut, Spring Garden, and 32d Streets into a new, pedestrian-friendly community with offices, an expanded Drexel University, and housing is not just smart; it is inspired. The plan linking two of the city's most vibrant economic centers, University City and Center City, represents the kind of clear thinking that has been missing from past plans for the 30th Street Station area, among them covering the rail yard with a baseball stadium, convention center, or amusement park.
BUSINESS
December 16, 2015 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The massive rail yard at 30th Street Station would be partially capped under an evolving proposal to transform the area into a vibrant new neighborhood linking Center City with West Philadelphia. This framework also calls for three new pedestrian bridges over the Schuylkill, ample public space around the station and along the river, a revamped station building with more shopping, and a new transit center for intercity bus routes and expanded rail service. The draft, to be unveiled Wednesday during an open house at the station, integrates public responses to previously proposed alternatives for the so-called 30th Street Station District Plan being devised by Amtrak, Drexel University, SEPTA, Brandywine Realty Trust, and others.
NEWS
November 15, 2013 | BY HARRIS M. STEINBERG
THERE ARE 96 acres of prime real estate hiding in plain sight in the middle of our resurgent city. We scuttle past them every day by car or train. In a land-rich city like Philadelphia, it is often hard to see the treasures lying just beneath our feet. I'm talking about the rail yards at 30th Street. Bounded by the Schuylkill on the east, JFK Boulevard on the south, 32nd Street to the west and Spring Garden Street to the north, the rail yards are the most significant piece of real estate in the city.
BUSINESS
October 4, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
As 120 rail cars loaded with 80,000 barrels of sweet crude from North Dakota pulled with a clang into the South Philadelphia high-speed oil-train unloading yard, thunderous applause erupted from many of the 1,000 workers at the former Sunoco Inc. refinery. "Last year, we all thought we were going to get laid off and shut down," recalled Bob Partridge, who runs the warehouse for Philadelphia Energy Solutions L.L.C., operator of the former refinery. "Here we are and we are all working.
NEWS
June 1, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA officials apologized Thursday for keeping Regional Rail passengers in the dark about rush-hour delays Wednesday evening that affected 68 trains. "Beyond the mechanical problem, we were also delayed in getting concrete information out to customers, and that only heightened frustrations," SEPTA said in a statement issued to riders Thursday. An empty Paoli/Thorndale train on its way from a rail yard to Center City broke down at 4:50 p.m. at a junction near 16th Street and Indiana Avenue in North Philadelphia, partially blocking a key intersection and making it difficult to operate switches, SEPTA said.
NEWS
November 12, 2012 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drexel University's entrepreneurial president has set his sights on the possibility of building over and developing part of the Schuylkill Rail Yards, long ogled by visionaries for its expansive prospects yet largely untouched because of the potential infrastructure problems it poses. President John A. Fry is embarking on a university-funded million-dollar-plus feasibility study with Amtrak and SEPTA to determine options. Could 30th Street Station and its West Philadelphia community be connected to the Art Museum and Center City via an elevated platform built atop the rail yards?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | By Stephan Salisbury and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Across Columbus Boulevard from the looming façade of Dave and Buster's, half a dozen archaeologists sweltered around a hole in the ground Tuesday afternoon and looked with enthusiasm at a lot of brown and black dirt and rock, as archaeologists often do.   A hole and rubble inspired hope. Tim Mancl hefted about a foot-and-a-half length of old encrusted iron, slightly rounded at the top. "This is a section of rail from the rail yard," he said. "It's really heavy. " He laid it down with a clank.
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