CollectionsRailroad Ties
IN THE NEWS

Railroad Ties

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 18, 1991 | By Marego Athans, Special to The Inquirer
They're all grown up now, with wives and mortgages. But every Monday night, they come over to Bob's basement. See, one day a long time ago, when they had nothing but imagination, each of them left a job undone or a vision unfulfilled. The years brought them together. And the years also brought skills and money, 1,000 pounds of plaster, thousands of dollars worth of lumber, 70,000 railroad ties and 1,000 tiny trees. Now they can play make-believe the way they say it ought to be played.
NEWS
April 22, 1996 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A burning freight train rumbled through Tredyffrin, East Whiteland and West Whiteland Townships yesterday morning, touching off small brush fires along seven miles of track running along houses near Route 202 and businesses near Lancaster Avenue. Three carloads of wooden railroad ties caught fire somewhere east of Berwyn and were extinguished in Thorndale, where the train stopped after Chester County emergency dispatchers alerted Conrail about the blaze, company spokesman Ray Husband said.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / PAUL HU
Firefighters clear away railroad ties after a fire at the SEPTA yard near State Road. No one was injured during the blaze yesterday, officials said, and the cause was under investigation.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
Amtrak yesterday suspended an inspector and a supervisor who last week approved a deteriorated stretch of railroad tracks that caused a Gamblers' Express train to derail three days later, officials said. Amtrak spokesman Clifford Black said the workers were temporarily taken off the payroll until an internal inquiry and a hearing into their performance were completed in two to three weeks. He declined to release their names. A report submitted by the suspended inspector Aug. 16 and reviewed by the suspended supervisor indicated that a side track in Winslow Township was checked and that no repairs were needed, Black said.
NEWS
August 21, 1990 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
Deteriorated wooden railroad ties, which had passed an Amtrak inspection last week, caused Sunday afternoon's derailment in Winslow of four cars of a Philadelphia-bound Gamblers' Express train, officials said. The tracks should have been kept about 4 feet 8 1/2 inches apart by the wooden ties, but they bowed wider because of the deterioration, causing the derailment, said Amtrak spokesman Clifford Black. The 2:38 p.m. accident injured four of the 170 passengers and caused an estimated $65,000 in damage to the train, Black said.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
A FREIGHT TRAIN carrying crude oil derailed on a Grays Ferry bridge last month because a maintenance crew didn't follow protocols, the rail line's operator reported yesterday. CSX, according to a statement, told the Federal Railroad Administration that the Jan. 20 derailment over the Schuylkill occurred during a maintenance upgrade. The crew, according to CSX, finished the upgrade without "following CSX engineering protocols. " The crew did not replace temporary fasteners on the railroad ties with permanent ties, CSX said.
NEWS
February 7, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
An ordinance that would result in an additional $4,000 in annual revenues from building-permit fees is expected to be adopted this week by the Sharon Hill Borough Council. At a council committee meeting Thursday night, Councilman John Scully said the ordinance would increase building-permit fees by $10. He said that if the ordinance was adopted at a council meeting Thursday, as expected, the yearly revenue from building-permit fees would increase from about $8,000 to $12,000.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | By Leslie Florio, Special to The Inquirer
Herbert E. MacCombie Jr., the Colwyn Borough engineer, has resigned his position after 14 years of service. MacCombie's resignation was announced Thursday at the monthly borough council meeting. "Herb has been around a long time, almost as long as me," said councilman Ralph Orr. "I regret to see him go, but I know he has other job commitments. " MacCombie would not comment on his resignation. He also is employed as the engineer for Aldan Borough and Tinicum Township, and said Thursday he would continue to serve as the engineer for those towns.
NEWS
November 13, 1986 | By Christine M. Johnson, Special to The Inquirer
For about nine years, Roy Bitterlich of Lexington Road has fought to prevent William Tennent High School students from driving their vehicles across his lawn as a shortcut to the street, he says. Bitterlich said he has planted shrubs, buried railroad ties and tried to maintain a wood fence in his yard, which borders high school property. Despite his efforts, his yard remains torn up, as student motorists continue to "barrel through" in cars and trucks and on motorcycles, he said.
NEWS
November 21, 1996 | By Matthew Dolan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a move that could strengthen their hand in prolonged negotiations with Mount Holly Township, the Burlington County freeholders last night discussed a plan to increase the number of county-owned parking spaces by about 20 percent. R. Thomas Jaggard, the county's planning engineer, presented the freeholders with a renovation plan to create an additional 119 spaces within the existing 513-space county parking lot off Rancocas Road. "These lots were put together over 10 years," Jaggard said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
A FREIGHT TRAIN carrying crude oil derailed on a Grays Ferry bridge last month because a maintenance crew didn't follow protocols, the rail line's operator reported yesterday. CSX, according to a statement, told the Federal Railroad Administration that the Jan. 20 derailment over the Schuylkill occurred during a maintenance upgrade. The crew, according to CSX, finished the upgrade without "following CSX engineering protocols. " The crew did not replace temporary fasteners on the railroad ties with permanent ties, CSX said.
NEWS
March 16, 2013 | By Jon Hurdle, NJ SPOTLIGHT
As Jersey Shore towns look for ways to rebuild boardwalks destroyed by Hurricane Sandy, one company is offering a recycled building material that it says is more durable than wood and reuses tons of plastic that would otherwise end up in landfills. Axion International, based in Union County, combines the kinds of plastic used in milk jugs and car dashboards to fabricate a substance that is strong enough to make railroad ties, and is resistant to the waves and water that degrade wooden boardwalks over time.
NEWS
July 16, 2009 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Almost three decades have gone by since railcars hauled sugar from the old Jack Frost refinery on the Delaware River. But that hasn't deterred an obscure, 120-year-old railroad company from staking a claim to the land under those ghost tracks - and throwing another challenge in the path of the SugarHouse Casino project. The Philadelphia Belt Line Railroad is trying to prevent SugarHouse developers from using a strip of land that cuts across the project's 22-acre site, which straddles Fishtown and Northern Liberties.
NEWS
February 19, 1999 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Staff Writer
There's an old verse about coal miners, and the last lines go like this: "Nothing but blackness above "And nothing that moves but the cars . . . "God, if You wish for our love "Fling us a handful of stars. " It is the lot of men who toil beneath the earth to dream of the open heavens, to be captivated by air and space. This is one of the themes at work in "October Sky," the story, the true story, of a West Virginia boy condemned to a life in the mines, rescued by his dream of reaching the stratosphere.
REAL_ESTATE
November 9, 1997 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
Village of Stoney Run, Maple Shade, Burlington County After speeding along bustling Route 73 in Maple Shade - a major highway two minutes from Routes 38, Interstate 295 and the New Jersey Turnpike that is lined with an eclectic mix of commercialism - turning into the Village of Stoney Run gives one a pleasant jolt. Quiet in timbre and tone, the heavily wooded garden-apartment community appears quite cozy, and far removed from commercial establishments. "I work in New York City, and this is near the bus to New York . . . and it's near the mall, as well as family and friends," said Carolyn Paloscio, 28. A trading assistant in a New York bank, Paloscio has lived at the Village of Stoney Run with Julio Robles, 24, for a little more than a year.
NEWS
July 1, 1997 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
A 4-year-old boy was struck and critically injured by a SEPTA commuter train last evening in West Philadelphia as he apparently played on the railroad tracks. At about 5:15 p.m., the boy, Raheem Kelly, of Yeadon, who was visiting his grandparents in the Regent Street area of Kingsessing, was on the tracks near the 49th Street station, possibly looking for tadpoles that live in the puddles between the railroad ties. A westbound R3 train sounded its whistle, but Raheem could not escape in time, witnesses said.
NEWS
November 21, 1996 | By Matthew Dolan, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In a move that could strengthen their hand in prolonged negotiations with Mount Holly Township, the Burlington County freeholders last night discussed a plan to increase the number of county-owned parking spaces by about 20 percent. R. Thomas Jaggard, the county's planning engineer, presented the freeholders with a renovation plan to create an additional 119 spaces within the existing 513-space county parking lot off Rancocas Road. "These lots were put together over 10 years," Jaggard said.
NEWS
April 22, 1996 | By Anne Barnard, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A burning freight train rumbled through Tredyffrin, East Whiteland and West Whiteland Townships yesterday morning, touching off small brush fires along seven miles of track running along houses near Route 202 and businesses near Lancaster Avenue. Three carloads of wooden railroad ties caught fire somewhere east of Berwyn and were extinguished in Thorndale, where the train stopped after Chester County emergency dispatchers alerted Conrail about the blaze, company spokesman Ray Husband said.
NEWS
March 13, 1996 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A troubled bridge over Bucks County waters has closed, bringing a serene silence to the quaint little village of Wycombe. The approximately 1,000 residents of the Victorian village, placed on the National Historic Register in 1985, are enjoying quietude for the first time in years. On Feb. 23, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation closed the 91-year-old, six-arch stone bridge over Mill Creek, which divides the central Bucks town, literally and philosophically. The one-lane bridge, also on the Historic Register, has a yawning crack where the roadway meets the retaining wall on the upstream side.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / PAUL HU
Firefighters clear away railroad ties after a fire at the SEPTA yard near State Road. No one was injured during the blaze yesterday, officials said, and the cause was under investigation.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|