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NEWS
September 12, 1987
The Staggers Act of 1980 greatly reduced regulation of freight-hauling railroads' rates and routes. With one big exception, this rail deregulation has generally served the nation well. Railroads promptly trimmed costs and improved productivity to make themselves competitive with trucking companies for the delivery of many goods. As a result, the rail industry says average rail-freight costs, adjusted for inflation, have dropped 5.1 percent since 1980. And after years of bankruptcies, America's railroads are turning modest profits: Major railroads' return-on-equity was 2.1 percent last year and 6.8 percent in 1985, the industry says.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | By Liam McDowall, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said he instructed his army yesterday to get ready to help guard Georgian railroads from rebels threatening to cut the vital supply lines. It was the strongest statement yet of Russia's commitment to get involved in Georgia, where leader Eduard A. Shevardnadze has been fighting two insurgencies. Russian troops and armored vehicles were patrolling roads last week along stretches of Georgian railroad affected by the civil war. The railway connects Black Sea ports to the Georgian capital of Tbilisi and landlocked Armenia.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1987 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's freight railroads could suffer serious economic hardship if Congress re-regulates the industry, a senior Reagan administration official warned here yesterday. Matthew V. Scocozza, assistant secretary of transportation, said the threat of re-regulation comes just as the railroads are beginning to enjoy the benefits of the 1980 Staggers Rail Act, which ended decades of federal control of rates. "We don't realize how dangerous the atmosphere is in Washington toward re- regulation," Scocozza said in a spirited speech to the Penjerdel Council in which he defended transportation deregulation of all kinds.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Railroads would get at least three more years, and as many as five, to finish a long-awaited rail safety upgrade and could face fines if they miss their benchmarks under a plan unveiled Tuesday and expected to advance in the U.S. House this week. The proposal - which has bipartisan House support - is the newest to give major freight and passenger rail lines more time to install Positive Train Control (PTC), a safety system that government experts say could have prevented the May Amtrak crash that killed eight and injured more than 200 in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1989 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Conrail's strategic planners determined earlier this year that it should invest some of its $650 million cash hoard in other, rail-related businesses, $44 million found a home in a company with deep Philadelphia roots. The investment was made in Trailer Train Co., now based in Chicago, a service owned by Conrail and other railroads and largely unknown to the public. But as obscure as it may be, the company might have played a key role in lowering the price and cutting the delivery time of the last automobile, piece of clothing or VCR you bought.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bibliophiles partial to trains may wish to make tracks to Thursday's book sale at Freeman/Fine Arts. More than 40 lots comprising 275 books and magazines devoted to railroads will be featured at the sale, as well as prints, property atlases and photographs. While none of the publications is particularly valuable, together they reflect a time when railroads dominated America's consciousness. There are histories of railroads famous and obscure, including The New Haven Railroad, Its Rise and Fall; The Ma and Pa, a History of the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad, and The Unique New York and Long Branch.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1986 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most major U.S. railroads are expressing interest in investing in Conrail if stock in it is sold to the public through a group led by the United Transportation Union (UTU), the union's president testified yesterday. The major railroads selected a spokesman to represent them in promoting the plan and had intended to publicly declare their support for it at a House subcommittee hearing, UTU president Fred M. Hardin said. But the railroads apparently bowed to pressure from "high-ranking" Reagan administration officials to withhold their endorsement of the UTU scheme for a while longer, Hardin said.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1989 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former head of the Federal Highway Administration yesterday said that a big battle was about to erupt in Congress over federal transportation spending and warned railroads they would be the losers unless they lobbied more effectively. Ray Barnhart, who ran the administration from 1981 to 1987, urged railroads to join motorists in trying to convince Congress that more federal tax dollars should be spent on rails and bridges used by both passenger and freight trains. If railroads don't act soon, their competitors in the trucking industry may persuade Congress to allow the use of heavier and longer trucks, Barnhart told a conference of railroad prople here.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
Joseph B. Muldoon, a noted utilities and railroads analyst, died Saturday. He was 67 and lived in Ardmore. "Railroads were one of his great passions," said his son-in-law, Steve Friedman. "He took trains all over the country. Railroads, his family and Jerome Kern. " A member of the research department at the Philadelphia brokerage firm of Janney Montgomery Scott and a chartered financial analyst, Muldoon was a kindly man with a ready wit. He was remindful both in temperament and appearance of "Santa Claus in a three-piece suit.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
In a move likely to rile shippers suffering because of two recent troubled rail deals, two more big railroads agreed to merge yesterday. Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp. and Canadian National Railway Co. said they would come together to create North America's largest freight railroad in a deal worth more than $6 billion. The new company, to be called North American Railways Inc., would create a transcontinental route linking Halifax, Nova Scotia, in Canada with the western United States.
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NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Emily Babay, STAFF WRITER
A juvenile died after falling from a railroad trestle into Neshaminy Creek in Bucks County this week. Northampton Township police said child fell about 4 p.m. Wednesday from a SEPTA trestle behind the Village Shires community in Holland. Police didn't release the juvenile's name, age or gender. The child received medical treatment at the scene and was flown in a medical helicopter to the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, but later died. Further details about the incident weren't available.
NEWS
June 23, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, Staff Writer
It started with a simple question from a passerby who noticed the clock at 12th and Market Street always seems to be off: Who owns it? We decided to find out.  It turns out the clock has a long, storied history with Philadelphia and was once a sort of Tinder of its day.  Here's a post that piqued our curiosity on the Slack messaging app. Coming up on 120 years, with the exception of a 14-year absence, the four-faced post clock now...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
If you missed this brilliant theatrical commentary on contemporary race relations during last year's Fringe Festival (as I did), don't make the same mistake twice. Underground Railroad Game , reprised at FringeArts - created and performed by Jennifer Kidwell and Scott Sheppard - is both wildly entertaining and profoundly troubling. We, the audience, are cast as middle schoolers; we are about to begin a new thematic unit on the Civil War. Our two teachers have teamed up to make history come alive with the "Underground Railroad Game," whereby little black dolls are hidden in various spots around the school, and students, divided between the Union Army and the Confederate Army, have to transport the dolls to safe houses or else capture them.
NEWS
May 16, 2016
Male charged with throwing spikes, rocks Police identified Blake Bowers, 18, of North Philadelphia, as the man who threw 8-inch railroad spikes from an overpass in University City that struck three vehicles Friday night. Bowers, of the 1100 block of West Montgomery Avenue, was charged with aggravated assault, reckless endangerment, and related charges. He is accused of throwing the spikes off an overpass about 40 feet above the 600 block of University Avenue in University City shortly before 8:30 p.m. One spike smashed through the windshield of a Dodge Charger and lodged in the dashboard; the driver was treated for broken glass in his eyes.
NEWS
May 10, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
When the enemies of slavery were turned away from community meeting places, farmer and lime merchant George Corson gave them a sanctuary where they could rail loud and long against what was known as "the peculiar institution. " Cobbled together in 1856 from a carriage shed and a stone barn at Germantown and Butler Pikes, Abolition Hall became a locus for the antislavery movement in a neighborhood that already was an Underground Railroad station as significant as any in the United States.
NEWS
April 20, 2016
ISSUE | HISTORY Site threatened Sunday's Memory Stream column made vivid the role of William Still in conveying slaves to freedom via the Underground Railroad (" 'That glorious humanitarian institution' "). That Still chronicled this history through his journals is even more remarkable. Among the details captured in Still's journals is a tribute to George Corson, a Quaker from Plymouth Meeting best known as the builder of Abolition Hall. Corson and others from his extended family were conductors on the Underground Railroad, and George and his wife, Martha Maulsby Corson, sheltered runaway slaves in their home, barn, and fields.
NEWS
December 26, 2015 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
Linda Weston, the Philadelphia woman sentenced to life in prison last month for enslaving and torturing disabled adults for years in a Tacony basement, now says she was "railroaded" by her lawyers into pleading guilty, and is accusing her victims of taking money to lie about her. In a handwritten letter to U.S. District Judge Cynthia M. Rufe, Weston, 56, maintained she was unaware of what was happening when she accepted a plea deal this year that...
NEWS
December 19, 2015
By Christopher Hart During this holiday season, millions of Americans will ride on passenger railroads to be with family and friends. It's certainly a very safe way to make the trip. But if all had gone as planned, travel by rail could have been even safer. That's because a technology called positive train control (PTC) can detect imminent collisions and trains moving at excessive speeds. Humans can make errors, even on their best days, and PTC provides an extra safety net that slows or stops trains when their operators do not. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB)
NEWS
December 5, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Senate and House approved a sweeping transportation bill Thursday that could help increase the compensation to victims of the May 12 Amtrak crash in Philadelphia and boost funding for rail safety - both steps coming in response to the derailment that killed eight people. The five-year, $305 billion bill includes policy provisions related to highway safety, railroads, and road programs. Several policy riders, though, including one to reauthorize the Export-Import Bank, drew criticism, and some faulted the bill for being funded with gimmicks.
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