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NEWS
September 12, 1987
The Staggers Act of 1980 greatly reduced regulation of freight-hauling railroads' rates and routes. With one big exception, this rail deregulation has generally served the nation well. Railroads promptly trimmed costs and improved productivity to make themselves competitive with trucking companies for the delivery of many goods. As a result, the rail industry says average rail-freight costs, adjusted for inflation, have dropped 5.1 percent since 1980. And after years of bankruptcies, America's railroads are turning modest profits: Major railroads' return-on-equity was 2.1 percent last year and 6.8 percent in 1985, the industry says.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | By Liam McDowall, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin said he instructed his army yesterday to get ready to help guard Georgian railroads from rebels threatening to cut the vital supply lines. It was the strongest statement yet of Russia's commitment to get involved in Georgia, where leader Eduard A. Shevardnadze has been fighting two insurgencies. Russian troops and armored vehicles were patrolling roads last week along stretches of Georgian railroad affected by the civil war. The railway connects Black Sea ports to the Georgian capital of Tbilisi and landlocked Armenia.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1987 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
The nation's freight railroads could suffer serious economic hardship if Congress re-regulates the industry, a senior Reagan administration official warned here yesterday. Matthew V. Scocozza, assistant secretary of transportation, said the threat of re-regulation comes just as the railroads are beginning to enjoy the benefits of the 1980 Staggers Rail Act, which ended decades of federal control of rates. "We don't realize how dangerous the atmosphere is in Washington toward re- regulation," Scocozza said in a spirited speech to the Penjerdel Council in which he defended transportation deregulation of all kinds.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1989 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Conrail's strategic planners determined earlier this year that it should invest some of its $650 million cash hoard in other, rail-related businesses, $44 million found a home in a company with deep Philadelphia roots. The investment was made in Trailer Train Co., now based in Chicago, a service owned by Conrail and other railroads and largely unknown to the public. But as obscure as it may be, the company might have played a key role in lowering the price and cutting the delivery time of the last automobile, piece of clothing or VCR you bought.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bibliophiles partial to trains may wish to make tracks to Thursday's book sale at Freeman/Fine Arts. More than 40 lots comprising 275 books and magazines devoted to railroads will be featured at the sale, as well as prints, property atlases and photographs. While none of the publications is particularly valuable, together they reflect a time when railroads dominated America's consciousness. There are histories of railroads famous and obscure, including The New Haven Railroad, Its Rise and Fall; The Ma and Pa, a History of the Maryland and Pennsylvania Railroad, and The Unique New York and Long Branch.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1986 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most major U.S. railroads are expressing interest in investing in Conrail if stock in it is sold to the public through a group led by the United Transportation Union (UTU), the union's president testified yesterday. The major railroads selected a spokesman to represent them in promoting the plan and had intended to publicly declare their support for it at a House subcommittee hearing, UTU president Fred M. Hardin said. But the railroads apparently bowed to pressure from "high-ranking" Reagan administration officials to withhold their endorsement of the UTU scheme for a while longer, Hardin said.
BUSINESS
November 10, 1989 | By Tom Belden, Inquirer Staff Writer
The former head of the Federal Highway Administration yesterday said that a big battle was about to erupt in Congress over federal transportation spending and warned railroads they would be the losers unless they lobbied more effectively. Ray Barnhart, who ran the administration from 1981 to 1987, urged railroads to join motorists in trying to convince Congress that more federal tax dollars should be spent on rails and bridges used by both passenger and freight trains. If railroads don't act soon, their competitors in the trucking industry may persuade Congress to allow the use of heavier and longer trucks, Barnhart told a conference of railroad prople here.
NEWS
December 14, 1987 | By GLORIA CAMPISI, Daily News Staff Writer
Joseph B. Muldoon, a noted utilities and railroads analyst, died Saturday. He was 67 and lived in Ardmore. "Railroads were one of his great passions," said his son-in-law, Steve Friedman. "He took trains all over the country. Railroads, his family and Jerome Kern. " A member of the research department at the Philadelphia brokerage firm of Janney Montgomery Scott and a chartered financial analyst, Muldoon was a kindly man with a ready wit. He was remindful both in temperament and appearance of "Santa Claus in a three-piece suit.
BUSINESS
December 21, 1999 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
In a move likely to rile shippers suffering because of two recent troubled rail deals, two more big railroads agreed to merge yesterday. Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp. and Canadian National Railway Co. said they would come together to create North America's largest freight railroad in a deal worth more than $6 billion. The new company, to be called North American Railways Inc., would create a transcontinental route linking Halifax, Nova Scotia, in Canada with the western United States.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Charles G. Super Jr., 84, a former accounting department employee for three Philadelphia-based railroads and a freelance newspaper writer and editor, died Sunday at the Village of Neshaminy Falls retirement community in Montgomeryville. He retired in 1976 after 40 years with the former Pennsylvania Railroad and its successor, Penn Central, and then Conrail in the accounting office at 32d and Market Streets, Philadelphia. Mr. Super also had been a freelance writer for weekly newspapers and at one time was editor of the weekly Germantown Bulletin.
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NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum and Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writers
Amtrak Train 188 was traveling at more than 100 m.p.h., more than double the speed limit, when it crashed Tuesday night at Frankford Junction, killing at least seven people and injuring about 200, investigators said Wednesday. The death toll was expected to rise, as emergency crews continued to search for bodies in the mangled wreckage of the seven-car train. About a dozen passengers were still missing. The deadly derailment could have been prevented if Amtrak had installed an electronic train-control system that is already in place on other parts of its rail network, National Transportation Safety Board member Robert Sumwalt said.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When you get right down to it, it was a question of physics. At the site of the Amtrak derailment on Tuesday, the track had a fairly significant curve. Imagine a giant circle with a diameter of nearly 2,900 feet, more than a half-mile. The track's path would trace the outline of that circle. The track also had a "superelevation" of five inches, meaning the outer rail was five inches higher than the inner rail. Given those parameters, a locomotive pulling seven Amtrak-size cars could safely travel up to about 55 m.p.h., said Pennsylvania State University engineer Steve Dillen, who performed a rough calculation at The Inquirer's request.
NEWS
May 15, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Investigators of Tuesday's deadly Amtrak derailment say they are focusing on reports that the train was traveling more than twice the 50-mile-an-hour speed limit when it entered a sharp curve in Frankford. An automatic train control system designed to prevent speeding was not in place where Amtrak Train 188 crashed, killing seven people and injuring more than 200. The train's engineer, who has not been identified, declined to give a statement to police investigators and left the East Detectives Division with an attorney, police commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Tougher inspection and maintenance standards for railroad tracks could prevent dangerous derailments of trains carrying explosive crude oil, officials of the rail inspectors' union say. Lawmakers in Congress and rail regulators have focused much of their attention on the strength of oil tank cars and the volatility of Bakken crude oil, but track flaws and train speed can also be significant factors in accidents. "Let's see what we can do to keep the damn trains on the track," said Rick Inclima, a member of the Federal Railroad Administration's (FRA)
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
  More than a decade after a group of urban pioneers living in the Loft District suggested the abandoned Reading Railroad viaduct could be repurposed as an elevated park, an unusual partnership will make the idea a reality and enable construction to start this summer on the first phase of the project. The William Penn and Knight Foundations plan to formally announce Monday that they are joining forces and checkbooks to fund $11 million worth of park improvements in Philadelphia, primarily in underserved neighborhoods.
NEWS
October 17, 2014 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a wide-ranging lecture on the Underground Railroad, which brought thousands of slaves to freedom in the 19th century, historian Charles Blockson said Wednesday that the role of Philadelphia cannot be overlooked. "Philadelphia was a major terminal on the Underground Railroad, because of its location as a seaport and so forth," Blockson told about 70 people at Temple University's Sullivan Hall. Inside the Charles L. Blockson Afro-American Collection, an archive of historical materials he has gathered over 70 of his 80 years, Blockson spoke for more than an hour about the network of safe houses and "conductors" that helped runaway slaves from the South make their way north to freedom.
NEWS
September 26, 2014 | BY JENELLE JANCI, Daily News Staff Writer jancij@phillynews.com, 215-568-5906
LARRY ROBIN wants to dig deeper into Philadelphia's role in the Underground Railroad. Robin, director of Moonstone Arts Center, and formerly of Robin's Bookstore, designed the center's upcoming Hidden History Program, "The Underground Railroad in Philadelphia. " The events will run from Sept. 29-Oct. 26. The program will kick off Monday with a showing and discussion of the film "The Underground Railroad: The William Still Story," at 5:30 p.m. at Walnut Street West Library. Moonstone Arts Center is offering nine free showings of the film throughout the program.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2014 | By Zoë Miller, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not the Hogwarts Express, but families looking for a fun locomotive outing can skip the costs (and the crowds) of a Florida amusement-park sojourn and head instead to the historic railroads of the Philadelphia area. There aren't any witches and wizards, but between the scenery and the amicable staff, the rails have a magic of their own. In Bucks County, about 50 minutes outside Philadelphia, you can visit the New Hope & Ivyland Railroad. "The buildings, the grounds, and the railroad itself date back to 1891, so the railroad cars we have here date back to as far as 1913," said Paul Harland, New Hope & Ivyland's general manager of passenger operations.
NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Julie Xie, Inquirer Staff Writer
Charles F. Fluehr, 82, of Cheltenham, a veteran and a former owner of his family's furniture store, died Tuesday, April 15, of leukemia at Einstein Medical Center Elkins Park. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Fluehr and his sister, Claire, were the third generation in their family to manage 5 Floor Fluehr Furniture Store at Front and Emerald Streets since it opened in 1888. Mr. Fluehr graduated from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in 1949, then earned a degree in commerce and business from the University of Notre Dame in 1953.
NEWS
March 14, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
NO ONE WAS injured and nothing was spilled in the Jan. 20 train derailment over the Schuylkill, but that didn't stop City Council members from peppering CSX executives with questions about how it happened. "We really just skipped over a catastrophe," Councilman Kenyatta Johnson told a panel of CSX representatives yesterday during a joint hearing of the committees on transportation and public utility and public safety. "Nobody stepped up to the plate and addressed this, saying, 'Hey - there's a tanker hanging off the side of the expressway.' " The councilman has been vocal about the lack of timely response from both the city and CSX after the derailment of seven cars carrying crude oil along the 25th Street Bridge in his South Philadelphia district.
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