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Railway

NEWS
November 26, 1989 | By Grahame L. Jones, Special to The Inquirer
It was shortly after 2:30 one sunny December afternoon that I met the button man. He stepped forward to take my luggage as I climbed from the bus that had brought me from the airport, a half-hour's ride away through the crackling, dry bush country of Northern Matabeleland. I forget his name, perhaps because I was so intrigued by his coat, which was covered in buttons and badges of every sort and color. He was the doorman at the Victoria Falls Hotel, and his grin of welcome was warm and friendly.
NEWS
December 2, 1998 | By Trudy Rubin
It is freezing cold in the new Moscow, well below zero on the Fahrenheit scale, but women in glamorous fur coats and hoods are heading for the subway, traffic jams the ring roads, and babushkas (grandmas) in knitted kerchiefs carry their bundles along the street. You might almost think that nothing had changed since Aug. 17, when the ruble crashed, Russia defaulted on its foreign debts, and the young liberal reformers whose policies had failed were dumped from power. The Western-style restaurants that used to be crowded with foreign businessmen and "new Russians" are still here.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | By Carolyn Acker, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
While thousands of others flocked to Saugerties, N.Y., this weekend, Ken Springirth made a pilgrimage to Philadelphia. Video camera in hand, Springirth left his home in Erie at 3:00 yesterday morning. He drove to Buffalo, N.Y., flew to Philadelphia, took a train to Chestnut Hill and, at 10 a.m., arrived at his ultimate destination: SEPTA's Germantown depot. Leave Woodstock to the others. Springirth had come to celebrate the 100th anniversary of trolley service along Germantown Avenue.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Charles J. Reutter Sr., 80, a retired special-investigations chief for a railway agency, died Tuesday of heart-related problems at his home in Middletown Township. During his 35 years with the Railway Express Agency, Mr. Reutter rose from patrolman to chief special agent with investigative responsibilities for the Eastern Seaboard, a post he held until his retirement in 1975. Over the years, he received more than 40 commendations from his department and other agencies. The FBI recognized him for helping to find someone who was involved with unauthorized plutonium shipments in the late 1950s, said a son, George Reutter, and he also was cited for his efforts by the New Jersey Police Chiefs Association and similar groups.
NEWS
October 25, 1987 | By Randall Peffer, Special to The Inquirer
Rolling north toward Bangkok. The moon has been stealing through the rice paddies for hours. "Hey you, American," whispers the woman in the seat facing me. She is Thai and her name is Song Mai. Her eyes don't rivet, as a Western stranger's might. They open and take me in as if I were a faintly remembered landscape. She passes a pint of Mae Khong whiskey. "Don't these trains always make you feel like a spy?" That's it. After logging a thousand miles over almost every bit of track - from Singapore's wharves to the beaches of Malaysia and Thailand's Golden Triangle - I have met a fellow traveler who can find words for the feeling you get on Southeast Asia's trains.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
The Supreme Court handed railway unions a defeat yesterday by ruling that federal law does not give workers a right to delay the sale of a railroad. The justices ruled 5-4 that the law does not obligate the railroads to "bargain about the impending sale or to delay its implementation" while the effects, such as a loss of jobs, are negotiated. The court ruled that the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad (P&LE) could sell its 182 miles of track in eastern Ohio and western Pennsylvania without first negotiating with its employees' unions.
NEWS
August 2, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During the railroad strikes of 1877, there were major riots in Pittsburgh and Reading, and the Pennsylvania National Guard was called out to restore order. But the troops proved to be unreliable, and after the conflict was settled the Guard underwent a complete reorganization. The reform involved a number of units from Montgomery County and was led by Gov. John F. Hartranft, who was a local Civil War hero. In July 1877, railroad workers reacting to arbitrary pay cuts went on strike from Baltimore to Chicago.
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
WE NOW have handy initials - PTSD - to label the psychological maladies that afflict war veterans, but still no way to make sense of the horror behind it. That is a point driven home in the engrossing "The Railway Man," the true story of a British soldier, Eric Lomax (Colin Firth), tortured in WWII, who finds his Japanese tormentor, an officer named Nagase (Hiroyuki Sanada), still alive decades later, and seeks him out. Lomax intends to kill the man, but their confrontation - among the most fascinating screen conversations of recent vintage - reveals commonalities in the men that take the encounter in unexpected directions.
NEWS
February 22, 1995 | By Barbara J. Richberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank Willis Hughes, 69, of Wynnewood, founder and former president of Hughes Railway Supplies, died Friday at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Mr. Hughes was born in West Hartford, Conn., attended the Admiral Farragut Academy in Toms River, N.J., and graduated from Lower Merion High School in 1943. He attended the University of Pennsylvania and graduated from the Wharton School in 1950. Mr. Hughes was an Army veteran of World War II. In 1955, he founded Hughes Railway Supplies, a manufacturer's representative business.
NEWS
May 29, 1988 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
The proposed Blue Route is supposed to give some relief to traffic problems in Whitemarsh Township. But under a proposal by one of the contractors, that traffic could get a lot worse before it gets better. Lane Construction Corp., contracted to build a 1.5-mile stretch of the highway from Chemical Road to the Pennsylvania Turnpike in Plymouth Township, is negotiating with the Corson Lime Quarry in Whitemarsh to provide 1.1 million cubic yards of dirt fill. That would mean 61,000 truckloads of dirt going from the quarry to the construction site each year, beginning this summer and continuing until September 1990, when the construction is scheduled to be done, according to Lawrence J. Gregan, Whitemarsh Township manager.
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