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NEWS
March 16, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
South Indian police today questioned two men in connection with a railway bridge bombing that sent a speeding express train into a dry river bed, killing at least 32 people. Police in Tamil Nadu, India's southernmost state, told Reuters the two unidentified men were picked up in a village near the Marudaiyar Bridge on which two remote-controlled bombs were detonated early yesterday. The bridge is about 160 miles south of Madras. They also said a camp near the bridge housing Tamil guerrillas fighting for "Eelam," a separate homeland in Sri Lanka, was cordoned off and searched for incriminating material, but gave no further details.
NEWS
August 2, 1998 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
During the railroad strikes of 1877, there were major riots in Pittsburgh and Reading, and the Pennsylvania National Guard was called out to restore order. But the troops proved to be unreliable, and after the conflict was settled the Guard underwent a complete reorganization. The reform involved a number of units from Montgomery County and was led by Gov. John F. Hartranft, who was a local Civil War hero. In July 1877, railroad workers reacting to arbitrary pay cuts went on strike from Baltimore to Chicago.
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
West Chester funeral director Joseph Boyd, whose daily work might naturally expose him to the frailty of human existence, has stopped bicycling on streets in his town. "It's so dangerous out there," Boyd said the other day. West Chester high school teacher Martha Carson-Gentry has cut back using local country roads for some of her long-distance bicycling. "In Chester County," she said recently, "you can't do it anymore without an element of danger. " The undertaker and the high school teacher, when they contemplate their biking futures, look to the woods and the fields.
NEWS
October 12, 2010 | By Margaret Talev, McClatchy Newspapers
WASHINGTON - With the weak economy driving voter discontent three weeks out from congressional and state elections, President Obama on Monday renewed his call to spend an additional $50 billion on improving the nation's transportation infrastructure. His plan calls for rebuilding 150,000 miles of roads, laying or maintaining 4,000 miles of railways, restoring 150 miles of airport runways, and advancing a new air-traffic control system. He said crumbling infrastructure weakens the economy and leaves the nation trailing foreign competitors in investment, including China, Russia, and Europe.
NEWS
November 29, 2013 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last of two articles. High-speed rail in the United States is closest to reality in California, but the nation's busiest rail route - the Northeast Corridor - is struggling just to keep the trains running as Amtrak pleads for money to eventually bring bullet trains to the Northeast. The 457-mile-long corridor between Washington and Boston carries 750,000 riders and 2,000 trains a day on an antiquated system prone to frequent failures and delays. And while California can largely start from scratch to build a high-speed line planned to connect Los Angeles and San Francisco by 2029 - though it must overcome legal and funding challenges, including a ruling this week stopping a bond sale - the corridor faces a daunting retrofit.
NEWS
February 14, 2012 | By Miriam Hill, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the subterranean shadows, the models scurry at the sound of people tromping their way. They won't say why they chose this abandoned SEPTA tunnel for a fashion shoot, though the cavernous space does offer a darkly glamorous backdrop. Above them, traffic zooms by on Pennsylvania Avenue, just steps from the Art Museum. The noise of cars and trucks barely penetrates the thick walls of the passage. On this particular Saturday, a group of about 40 people were drawn here - armed with flashlights to avoid rocks and empty soda bottles in the blackness - by Paul vanMeter, a hyperkinetic professional gardener.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1988 | By Idris Michael Diaz, Inquirer Staff Writer The Journal of Commerce contributed to this article
Conrail has offered to take over the financially troubled Delaware & Hudson Railway, which yesterday filed for protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The Delaware & Hudson, a regional railroad that is a subsidiary of closely held Guilford Transportation Industries Inc. of Billerica, Mass., apparently has become a casualty of Guilford's unsuccessful battle to circumvent union work-rule and staffing requirements. Guilford's efforts were thwarted last week when a federal arbitrator invalidated the company's plan to lease the Delaware & Hudson's assets to Springfield Terminal, another subsidiary that has lower labor costs.
NEWS
July 12, 1987 | By Steve Wartenberg, Special to The Inquirer
The last time A. Duer Pierce Jr. took a train from the Kennett Square Station, it was June 1944. He was on his way to Philadelphia to be inducted into the service and was too nervous to enjoy the scenery. This year, on July 4, Pierce was back at the station, this time with his two granddaughters in tow, helping the Octorara Railway celebrate its 10th anniversary. In honor of the anniversary, the railway, normally used for freight, was offering 20-minute passenger service between Kennett Square and Avondale.
NEWS
April 15, 1993 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The commissioners lifted a gag order Monday night and permitted the Park and Recreation Board to resume a study of prospective bicycle and pedestrian trails. The park and recreation staff had been prohibited from reviewing or even discussing trails under a gag order imposed last month by Commission President Clinton A. Stuntebeck after protests from residents about a proposed bicycle trail for the abandoned Philadelphia & Western Railway. A resolution to patch up differences between commissioners and the park board was introduced by Commissioner Curtis R. Nase and unanimously adopted, 7-0. "We have to soothe any wounds that may have occurred," Nase said.
NEWS
April 11, 1988 | By JIM SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
The prosecutor called them "20th-century train robbers. " Although they can't compare with the Butch Cassidys of the past, they were good at jumping onto a moving boxcar and ditching its cargo on the side of the track for friends to cart away. The setting was Southwest Philadelphia, near 56th Street, where the Conrail trains run slowly. Between August 1986 and last May, mostly at night, the gang ripped off goods, mostly clothing and VCRs, worth $93,000, Assistant U.S. Attorney Lee J. Dobkin said.
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