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Railworks

NEWS
May 4, 1993 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
At the Norristown Transportation Center yesterday morning, SEPTA service supervisor William T. Ryals was standing at the side of the Center City express buses, bullhorn in hand. His mission was to help ease the pain of commuters from the northern suburbs whose trains will be out of service for the next four months, as the transit authority works to complete the second phase of RailWorks, its two- year bridge replacement and refurbishing project. On this day, his task looked easy.
NEWS
March 9, 2004 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Somewhere near SEPTA's R-5 Line in Malvern is the mass grave of 57 Irish workers who died while toiling on the railroad in the 1830s. For years, people have believed they were buried just feet from the track - one marker was placed at the spot in 1909, another in 1998. But recent research by two Immaculata University professors, William E. Watson and John Ahtes, now challenges that presumed location - and other aspects of the workers' sad story. "It's mostly myth and forklore until now," Watson said.
NEWS
October 8, 1992 | By Diane Struzzi, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Service on six of SEPTA's regional rail lines is back on track after completion of the first phrase of the RailWorks project. The project had shut down the lines from April 5 to Saturday. The reopening of the lines this week was a godsend for Karen Smith, who said she had been "counting the days" until she could start traveling again on the R6 Norristown line into Center City Smith had taken to driving into Philadelphia, which often took up to two hours because of traffic - not to mention the money spent on gas and parking.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Those sharp saw-blade teeth ripping into their prey. Those maddening sounds that haunt you at night. The screams of the helpless victims. Just when you thought it was safe to ride the trains . . . RailWorks II! Yes, SEPTA, that metallic monster that carries a million passengers in its belly each day, is back in action, repairing and replacing 4.5 miles of track, wiring and bridges in North Philadelphia. The operation of seven major rail lines will be suspended beginning today.
NEWS
April 6, 1992 | by Bob Warner, Daily News Staff Writer
Former Eagles wide receiver Mike Quick is running a new pattern - as a spokesman and poster celebrity for SEPTA and the Broad Street Subway. SEPTA says he's got the perfect name and reputation for a speedy trip from one place to another. They're paying him $7,500 over the next two years to make five public appearances and have his picture used in promotional spots for the subway and SEPTA's Railworks project. "Mike Quick represents the message we wanted to get across, the idea that SEPTA is a convenient, reliable, speedy way to get from one place to another," said Bernard Allmayer, the account executive at SEPTA's advertising agency, McAdams, Richman & Ong. "Mike Quick embodied that when he was a player with the Eagles.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1992 | by Valerie M. Russ, Daily News Staff Writer
Most of the merchants who rent from SEPTA at the Penn Center Suburban Station Concourse have not been able to pay their April rents since SEPTA's RailWorks project began earlier this month, a leader of the merchants' group said yesterday. And, she said, several stores have begun to lay off employees. "We don't have the money to pay," said Valerie Fucetola, owner of the Cookie Express and Bakery and president of a newly formed concourse merchants association. The merchants blame the RailWorks reconstruction project for diverting thousands of commuters away from the station daily.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | By Michael Matza, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than 25,000 commuters in the Philadelphia area could lose their customary rides to work tomorrow if the strike threatened by Amtrak and Conrail workers takes place. Although the job action would not affect SEPTA employees, nearly all of SEPTA's regional railroad lines operate on tracks that are owned or maintained by Amtrak and Conrail, a SEPTA spokesman said. So a strike would halt most train service in the region and add traffic to area roadways. In addition, Amtrak and Conrail employees man the control towers that dispatch trains and regulate traffic throughout the Northeast Corridor.
NEWS
July 8, 1992 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
SEPTA's major reconstruction of a four-mile stretch of track is in one of two shutdown periods planned over four years. RailWorks, a $354 million project financed mostly by federal funds, is a renovation of the main corridor of the old Reading line. Service on the six SEPTA regional lines that feed into the stretch between Wayne Junction Rail Station and Ninth and Brown Streets in North Philadelphia is suspended until Oct. 3, but there are alternative rail and bus options for commuters.
NEWS
September 12, 1993
SEPTA's big new look is RailWorks, the two-year, $264 million rebuilding program that ended Labor Day weekend. SEPTA also marked the moment with a smaller new look: more user-friendly rail timetables. The redesign results from gripes the transit authority heard at focus groups. To win back former riders and attract new ones, SEPTA has been assembling focus groups of commuters to talk about where improvements could be made. "People commented that the schedules were too difficult to understand," said Richard DiLullo, manager of marketing for SEPTA.
NEWS
October 11, 1992
WHY ADD 'ADOPTED' TO DAUGHTER OF MIA FARROW? With all the recent articles concerning Woody Allen, I am writing to express concern with the constant references to Mia Farrow's "adopted" daughter. I resent the categorization of sons or daughters as adopted. Children enter families in several ways; adoption is one of them, and an adopted child is every bit a member of a family as a genetically linked child. To use the label of adopted categorizes children and affords them second-class citizen status.
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