CollectionsRain Forest
IN THE NEWS

Rain Forest

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 30, 1992 | By Michelle R. Davis, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Monkey screeches blended with the buzzing of bees and high-pitched bird calls. Wide green leaves formed a canopy overhead and leaf cutter ants marched up sturdy tree trunks encircled by clinging vines. The first-grade classroom at Oakmont Elementary School in Haverford had become a jungle. Actually, a rain forest, said teacher Nancy Scanlon. The scenery includes tissue-paper orchids, cardboard carpet roll tree trunks and a cloth, ice-blue waterfall. The children provide the sound effects.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAMPS WRITER
Germany has joined the clamor to save the tropical rain forests with a semi-postal stamp, part of the proceeds of which will go to protection of the environment. The 100+50 pfennig semi-postal, which will be issued Thursday, depicts a rain forest with the sun in the background and a body of water in the foreground. German Post said the stamp is being issued to highlight the intensive threat commercial interests pose to rain forests. Stripping the forests of timber, scientists say, already has resulted in ecological damage that will be felt both by man and animal.
NEWS
August 16, 1992 | For The Inquirer / JAY GORODETZER
Young readers in the Marple Library's summer reading program did more than pore through books during the six-week session - they built a whole tropical rain forest. The library is adorned with decorations depicting trees, vines and exotic flowers.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | By Denise Breslin Kachin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Students in several West Chester Area schools have been gaining knowledge of the Peruvian rain forest. This knowledge has not come from a textbook, but from a Peru-based program made available to the school district through its partnership with West Chester University. Roger W. Mustalish, a professor of environmental health at the university, learned of the Adopt-a-School program during a trip to Peru in 1993 and contacted the Amazon Center for Environmental Education and Research (ACEER)
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | For The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
The main hallway at the Samuel Everitt Elementary School in Levittown was transformed last week into a tropical rain forest by third through sixth graders. The project was part of the students' "Save Our Rain Forest" curriculum, in connection with Earth Day.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | By Joyce Vottima Hellberg, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The sounds of the bamboo flutes, steel guitars and synthesizers had the first graders swaying to the rhythms of the rain forest. "I can hear drums," said 7-year-old Adam Feiner. "It sounds like dropping rain," said Claire Avis, also 7. Using a colorful poster, their teacher, Dottie Nicolas, explained about the floor, understory, canopy and emergent layers in the rain forest and the products the rain forest produces. The children listened attentively as she talked about the rain forest as home for hundreds of species of plant life, insects and animals, including tree frogs, tree porcupines and toucans.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1992 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There are few places left on Earth that possess an awesome presence like that of a tropical rain forest. The forest's soaring trees, the searing heat and the stifling humidity create a place at once breathtaking and oppressive. What makes the rain forest most remarkable, however, is that it is a living entity. It is not a creation of geology or man but an intricate web of nature. And this is what is vividly captured in Tropical Rainforest, the new film opening today at the Franklin Institute's Tuttleman Omniverse Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Saviours of the Forest, a winning and witty documentary about the wholesale destruction of the South American rain forest, proves there are more than two sides to any question. Like just about everyone else on the planet, Bill Day and Terry Schwartz are appalled by the loss of a precious and irreplaceable resource. But when they arrive in Ecuador, they discover just how complex the issue is, and the movie that results is an often hilarious dissection of fallibility, stupidity and greed.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1991 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The Rainforest/Crossroads, an installation by Paula Rendino at Owen/Patrick Gallery in Manayunk, schleps a ton of ideological baggage about the depredations visited on the Brazilian rain forest by a rapacious patriarchal culture. In fact, all three of Rendino's installations involve variations of this most cosmic of themes, the need to balance the needs of man against the capacity of the environment to sustain life. Not that this isn't a topic worth investigating, but in this case, it's more rewarding to ignore the artist's tendentious explanation of purpose and let the work speak for itself.
NEWS
December 18, 1994 | By Lara Wozniak, FOR THE INQUIRER
The ride into the rain forest was a hellish four-hour trip in a covered wagon pulled by a tractor. Every other second, it seemed, the tractor would slip into a ditch, jerking the wagon forward and causing us to fly into the air, hit our heads on the frame and then slam back down on the thinly cushioned, wooden bench. I swore I would never do it again. So when time came to leave the 882 acres of rain forest called Rara Avis, I decided to hike. A few minutes into the walk and I was dreaming about the luxuries of tractor travel.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 22, 2015 | BY VANCE LEHMKUHL
  ON EARTH DAY, there are those who get into celebrating the planet and tweaking our lifestyle for the common good, and there are those who don't. Those who don't sometimes make good points about home recycling bins as mere spit in the ocean of vast industrial pollution, and other times indulge in stubborn ear-plugging accompanied by magical and/or wishful thinking. To all of us who recognize a scientifically credible threat, the head-in-sand position can be frustrating, and we might roll our eyes at its ridiculousness.
TRAVEL
October 20, 2014 | By Jessica Miller, For The Inquirer
I lifted my backpack to my knees, shuffling everything inside it until I found my headphones and sketch pad. I needed these objects to distract me from hearing the man in front of me, belting out the Portuguese song playing on his iPod. Along with the other bewildered passengers at my sides, I couldn't resist releasing a giggle and smiling in the direction of my feet. I could catch a glimpse of the singing man through his reflection in the window. He appeared to be energized, and he sang with his eyes tightly shut.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
THE LAST OF his kind leads his family on a perilous voyage, with a distinct environmental message - "Rio 2" is "Noah" with funkier music. Bruno Mars contributes a song, as does Janelle Monae, but I was partial to Kristin Chenoweth singing "Poisonous Love" - a ballad that a tree frog sings to her would-be cockatoo boyfriend. The soundtrack and the songs are supervised by Sergio Mendes, who, working with director Carlos Saldanha, has shaped the sequel as a full-on musical, perhaps to capture some of that music/movie "Frozen" synergy.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a case that has cost tens of millions in legal fees and riveted the attention of legal experts nationwide, a federal judge in New York on Tuesday found that an $18 billion judgment against energy giant Chevron Corp. for polluting a wide swath of the rain forest in Ecuador was procured through fraud, including bribery and doctored experts' reports. In an exhaustive, 485-page opinion, U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan found that lead plaintiffs' lawyer Steven Donziger initiated the fraud in 2006, after it appeared that the case in Ecuador had begun to go against him. Kaplan found that Donziger, who is based in New York, had concealed the fraud from Kohn Swift & Graf, a Philadelphia plaintiffs firm that financed the case until it pulled out in 2009 over concern that Donziger and his team had acted improperly.
TRAVEL
January 6, 2014 | By Keith Costigan, For The Inquirer
We sat on our surfboards and let the warm Pacific swell lift us and set us down in turns, waiting for the wave that would carry us to shore. Looking east, we squinted into the low morning light of a tropical sun and saw hot, white sand, steaming rain forest, and distant mountains all under a crystalline blue sky. For my wife, Amy, and me, it was the long-planned trip of a lifetime, repeatedly postponed because surfing the high season in Costa Rica...
NEWS
February 27, 2013 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
AVON, N.J. - This Jersey Shore town, facing the threat of a boycott over its plan to use rain forest wood to rebuild a boardwalk destroyed by Hurricane Sandy, isn't backing down. Avon, in Monmouth County, says it will stick with its plan to use ipe wood. At a meeting Monday night, several environmental groups asked the Borough Commission to reconsider but were rebuffed. "There is a consensus to move ahead," Commissioner Frank Gorman said after hearing nearly two hours of objections from residents and out-of-town environmentalists.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2012
Film New this week: Killing Them Softly (***1/2 out of four stars) Brad Pitt is a hit man called in to clean up after the messy robbery of a mob-protected card game in Andrew Dominik's jolting, suspenseful, bloody, and bloody entertaining, crime pic, adapted from a vintage George V. Higgins novel. - Steven Rea Music Nightlands The one-man band of War on Drugs bassist Dave Hartley, Nightlands will perform Hartley's original score for Stanley Kubrick's far-seeing 1968 sci-fi movie 2001: A Space Odyssey on Tuesday night at PhilaMOCA.
NEWS
November 28, 2012
Beauty queen a human shield? CULIACAN, Mexico - A Mexican beauty queen killed over the weekend in a shootout between suspected drug traffickers and soldiers likely was being used as a human shield, a federal official said Tuesday. Maria Susana Flores Gamez, crowned 2012 Woman of Sinaloa in February, came out of the car first with a gun in her hands during the confrontation, with the other gunmen hiding behind her, according to the official from the attorney general's office. He spoke on condition of anonymity.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2012 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
Explore the rain forests of South America at Delaware Museum of Natural History's "Rain Forest Adventure" exhibition through Jan. 6. The exhibition will allow visitors to learn though activities such as becoming a research assistant, wearing a lab coat, and using microscopes and slides to examine bugs from the rain forest, including a blue iridescent butterfly and other creatures. Via video display, families will meet children who live in the rain forest as they discuss the challenges they face.
NEWS
October 11, 2011
Diane Cilento, 78, an Oscar-nominated Australian actress who was once married to Sean Connery, died Thursday in northern Australia. The Queensland-born actress rose to fame in the 1950s and 1960s, starring alongside such screen giants as Charlton Heston and Paul Newman. In 1956, she was nominated for a Tony Award for her portrayal of Helen of Troy in the play Tiger at the Gates . She received an Academy Award nomination in 1963 for best supporting actress for her work in the film Tom Jones . Her celebrity grew after she married Connery - her second husband - in 1962.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|