CollectionsRalph Nader
IN THE NEWS

Ralph Nader

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 26, 2004 | By Robert Scheer
No, not Nader again. In an act of pure egotism, Ralph Nader - who has been largely silent on the main issues of the day, nursing his wounds since the last time he messed up an election - insists on another chance to play at electoral politics on the national stage. Does he have no sense of accountability or shame? Yes, Al Gore shares responsibility with the U.S. Supreme Court for the fact that George W. Bush ended up as president. But without Nader in the picture in 2000, Bush's narrow Electoral College victory would have been impossible to scam.
NEWS
January 4, 1992 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Consumer activist Ralph Nader has been placed on the Democratic ballot for Massachusetts' March 10 presidential primary. Massachusetts is the first state primary on which Nader's name appears, said Carl Mayer, Nader campaign spokesman, from Manchester, N.H., yesterday. Yesterday was the last day for candidates from all parties to have their names entered on the Massachusetts presidential primary ballots. While Nader has not, at this point, announced his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination, there is a write-in effort for him in New Hampshire, Mayer said.
NEWS
February 17, 2004
Ralph Nader is right. Under the First Amendment, he has an inalienable right to pursue his dour, doomed, egocentric quest for the presidency of the United States, no matter what effect it might have. The famous public-interest crusader is also right about this: The two main political parties show huge arrogance when they dismiss as beneath media and voter notice any candidate not blessed by their venal structures. Yes, Nader is correct that he has a right to run. No one - surely not some newspaper in Philadelphia - can him tell he doesn't.
REAL_ESTATE
June 25, 1993 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
Nationally known consumer advocate Ralph Nader, who has successfully tackled such giants as the automobile and insurance industries, has turned his attention to the residential real estate business. Nader, the founder and president of the Center for Responsive Law, will be the featured speaker at a two-day conference on changes facing the real estate industry on Aug. 5-6 at the Adam's Mark Hotel on City Line. Jerilyn Coates, a Montgomery County broker and president of the Real Estate Representatives, said she organized the conference to resolve the confusion among professionals and consumers who are bewildered about many of the most basic issues of real estate.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
The consumer movement shows that citizens are looking beyond the "smoke screens established by America's corporations in cahoots with the federal government" to promote profitability, according to consumer advocate Ralph Nader. Nader spoke to an enthusiastic crowd of more than 500 people at Bucks County Community College last week. In his talk, Nader, who gained national attention more than two decades ago with his book Unsafe at Any Speed, in which he criticized General Motors' Corvair, zeroed in on the issue of food additives.
BUSINESS
October 22, 1986 | By KIT KONOLIGE, Daily News Staff Writer
Consumer advocate Ralph Nader was in town yesterday to urge Philadelphia residents to join a new group purchasing organization that he said could save the average homeowner who uses heating oil $200 this winter. "This is a non-profit group based on the principle of a new relationship between buyers and sellers," Nader told a press conference at the Quality Inn on Pennsylvania Avenue. Nader said the new consumer group, called Buyers Up, is now negotiating for group buying in such areas as health, home and auto insurance, auto repair referrals and group legal services.
NEWS
November 9, 2000 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As the presidential election hung in the balance yesterday, Green Party candidate Ralph Nader was defiant. To call him a spoiler for the more than 96,000 votes he got in Florida was "the most impudent assertion of this campaign," he said during a news conference in Washington. "Al Gore is the only person who can defeat Al Gore," Nader said. "Gore had all the advantages of an incumbent administration, but he never generated enthusiasm. " Many of Nader's supporters, including those in Florida, were equally firm.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | By Larry Eichel
One morning in Los Angeles last week, I watched one liberal Democrat tell several hundred other liberal Democrats how to try to prevent their liberal friends from voting for Ralph Nader. The speaker was Barney Frank, congressman from Massachusetts, and his subject was the Supreme Court. For Democrats worried that the Nader vote might cost Al Gore the election, the court has emerged as the trump card. Their message to would-be Naderites is this: We know that you may not be thrilled with Gore, but understand that a vote for Nader is, in effect, a vote for George W. Bush.
NEWS
July 15, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The tentacles of the Bonusgate scandal have spread to past presidential politics. Buried deep in the grand jury report, released last week, that led to the indictment of 12 people are details of what is described as a "massive" effort by House Democrats to oust the independent presidential candidate Ralph Nader from the ballot in 2004. Also, the report says, in 2006 the same machine fired up again to boot from the ballot Carl Romanelli, the Green Party candidate for the U.S. Senate in a race won by Democrat Bob Casey.
NEWS
October 9, 2004 | By Dave Turner INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Bucks and Delaware Counties decided yesterday to begin mailing absentee ballots that include Ralph Nader's name, even though a state court has yet to rule on his presidential candidacy. Those ballots could begin going out Monday in Delaware County and later in the week in Bucks, officials said. Philadelphia and Montgomery County had already decided to begin mailing ballots that include Nader. Chester County officials did not return calls for comment. Commonwealth Court hearings on a challenge to signatures on Nader's nomination papers could continue until the middle of next week, according to Ron Darlington, the court's executive administrator.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
The "two-party tyranny" Ralph Nader once decried in a speech in Philadelphia remains a reality in Pennsylvania - and a fantasy in the city where he spoke, whose creaky Democratic machine rules unchallenged. The Founding Fathers, who often fretted about political factions, would rue what the major parties have wrought in the birthplace of America's democracy. Fortunately, the federal courts have finally taken aim at one egregious aspect of the two-party stranglehold in Pennsylvania: the absurd procedural and monetary barriers preventing third-party candidates from even appearing on the ballot.
NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Jim Musselman, who runs a socially conscious record company out of his East Goshen house, is releasing a new Pete Seeger CD Tuesday, one that features, among other things, a duet with Bruce Springsteen. Chances are, that's the only song you'll hear off that album. And, you'll have gotten it for free. Today, 95 percent of all music that's downloaded is pirated, industry groups report , which explains the pained expression on Musselman's face as he sits at Chester County Book & Music, a once-sprawling cultural mecca that plans to shutter sometime soon.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
ASSUMING, as I do, that Rick Santorum won't be the Republican nominee, here's a question: Could Rick do for the GOP in 2012 what Ralph Nader did for Democrats back in 2000? Hold on, I'm not saying the two are alike or that the elections are similar. I'm asking if Santorum is a spoiler - in the manner of Nader. You'll may recall that Nader got nearly 97,500 votes in Florida, the state that decided the '00 race. Al Gore lost Florida by about 540 votes. Could be said that Nader helped Republicans.
NEWS
June 28, 2011 | By Tom Infield, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ralph Nader never lets go of anything. He wouldn't let go of his campaign for auto safety in the 1960s, during which he became the bane of Detroit and almost single-handedly brought seat belts to American cars. He wouldn't let go of his long-shot run for president in 2004, though Democrats said it might have cost John Kerry his chance to beat George W. Bush. And he won't let go of what he believes was a wrong done to him by the Pennsylvania courts in 2004, when they knocked him off the ballot in the Keystone State, accused him of "extensive fraud" in the gathering of his nominating petition, and ordered him to reimburse $81,102 in legal fees rung up by the foes who sought to get him out of the race.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Morgan Spurlock gets to have his cake and eat it, too. And then sell it, shamelessly. In POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold , the documentarian who turned himself into a physical wreck for his debut film, the nothing-but-McDonald's-for-a-month Super Size Me , explores the billion-dollar world of product placement. You know, James Bond downing a Heineken, Tony Stark driving an Audi, and every movie star in the world Googling on iBooks. In a move that's at once meta and masterful, Spurlock goes about exposing the branding industry by getting brand names to fund his movie.
NEWS
March 11, 2010
Ralph Nader continues to shine an unflattering light on Pennsylvania's political system, with good reason. Nader wrote a letter this week to state Attorney General Tom Corbett (a candidate for governor), calling attention to court testimony about Democrats' effort to knock Nader off the presidential ballot in 2004. A witness in the ongoing corruption trial of former high-ranking Democratic Rep. Mike Veon testified recently that employees of the legislature worked on state time and used taxpayer-funded resources to challenge Nader's candidacy in court.
NEWS
January 4, 2009
Democratic tricks? You properly note ("Rethinking Nader's appeal," Dec. 26) the unfairness of Ralph Nader being hit for $81,000 in court costs because of defective signatures in his 2004 bid to make the Pennsylvania ballot. You also rightly point out that Democratic operatives were paid state salaries and bonuses for the political job of trying to keep Nader off the ballot. Yet somehow you missed the obvious point when you say that Nader's problem was that his "campaign supporters . . . filed nominating petitions from the likes of Mickey Mouse, Fred Flintstone, and other fictitious signers.
NEWS
September 26, 2008 | By Larry Eichel INQUIRER SENIOR WRITER
Independent presidential candidate Ralph Nader said yesterday that any federal bailout package for Wall Street should be limited to three months in duration. Speaking to the Inquirer Editorial Board before giving an address at the University of Pennsylvania, Nader said that Congress was being stampeded into action by the Bush administration just the way it was stampeded into the Iraq war. Putting an expiration date on the plan, he said, would allow for a full set of congressional hearings looking at such issues as executive compensation, shareholder power, and taxpayer equity, as well as the need for a bailout.
NEWS
August 18, 2008
Serves them right, if Democratic leaders in Harrisburg are worried now that independent presidential candidate Ralph Nader has landed on the November ballot. It was due to the Democrats' successful challenge of Nader's petition signatures in 2004 that the long-time consumer watchdog and political gadfly was tossed off the ballot when John Kerry ran against President Bush. That alone would be enough to fire up Nader supporters to do the job right this time. That they have done.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|