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NEWS
March 31, 1998 | By Tom Engelhardt
OK, so it took a little over 500 years, but the book, or rather buch, is back home. What Johann Gutenberg started in the 1450s in the town of Mainz with a Bible and a song, or at least a revolutionary method for reproducing words on vellum and paper, the German conglomerate Bertelsmann AG is attempting to complete with its purchase of Random House Inc. for unrevealed megasums. It's a purchase that makes for the kind of slogan opportunity ("One Book, One World," say) any ad agency would slaver for and that should leave the rest of us wordless.
LIVING
February 12, 1996 | By Tanya Barrientos, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The stern lawyers, dressed in somberly tailored suits, ask deep, probing questions in deep, probing voices that slash through the heavy air of the New York courtroom like knives tossed into the deep, raging sea. The defendant is a glamorous actress of a certain age, her raven-black hair tousled in a controlled wildness that frames her sculpted cheekbones and her full, crimson lips, which rest in a suggestive valentine-shaped pout. Her eyes are occasionally stained a blush-wine shade of pink from shedding tears of woe. She is Joan Collins, the she-wolf Alexis Colby of Dynasty fame, the 62-year-old star of the Reagan-era melodrama who stole men's hearts and took over companies with schemes and power grabs as bold as her sofa-sized shoulder pads.
NEWS
April 5, 1998 | By Stephan Salisbury, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Jennifer Moyer and her partner, Britt Bell, were sitting and chatting at the London International Book Fair when they heard the news, and instantly all talk about copyright and authors and reprints stopped. In a breath, she recalled later, the world seemed irrevocably transformed: Bertelsmann AG, the German media powerhouse, already the owner of Bantam Doubleday Dell, one of the biggest U.S. publishers, was plunking down $1.4 billion for Random House, the largest publisher of general English-language books in the world.
SPORTS
October 29, 2009 | Daily News Wire Services
Former NBA referee Tim Donaghy's tell-all book has been canceled by Triumph Books and parent company Random House. "Blowing the Whistle: The Culture of Fraud in the NBA" was slated for publication later this month, but during the process of editing and vetting the manuscript, which Triumph received from Donaghy in the spring, Random House and its imprint made the joint decision to cancel the book out of "concerns over potential liability....
NEWS
June 26, 2012
Anthony M. Schulte, 82, a publishing executive who was an early proponent of audiobooks and among the first to tap the ready-made audience for books written by trusted television personalities such as Alistair Cooke, Carl Sagan, and Walter Cronkite, died June 17 in a swimming accident in Maine. Authorities there said he drowned while taking his first swim of the season at his vacation home on Cupsuptic Lake, in the town of Oquossoc. Mr. Schulte was the No. 2 executive at Random House from the mid-1970s to the mid-'80s, when the company became the dominant force in U.S. publishing.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | By Carlin Romano INQUIRER BOOK CRITIC
W.G. Sebald, the acclaimed German novelist who was killed in a car crash in December, won the National Book Critics Circle award for fiction for Austerlitz (Random House), the story of an architectural historian that one critic praised as delivering "the soul of Europe itself. " Nicholson Baker's Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper (Random House) won the prize for general nonfiction. "Somewhere along the line," joked Baker, more widely known as a novelist, "I got pulled into library activism.
NEWS
December 19, 1993 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's been a banner year for audio. Quality has improved, title selection has widened, readers have gotten better. There are more full-length recordings; even the abridgments sound good. And there are far too many good ones to do justice to them all in a holiday gift list. Here, however, are some inexpensive favorites and a few new releases: Maya Angelou performs her poem for the presidential inauguration, "On the Pulse of the Morning," and talks about it in a recording for Random House (12 minutes, $5)
NEWS
February 28, 2016
For the week ended Feb. 28, compiled by Nielsen BookScan ©2016 The Nielsen Co. Fiction 1. Cometh the Hour Jeffrey Archer St. Martin's. $28 2. Brotherhood in Death J.D. Robb. Berkley. $28 3. NYPD Red 4 James Patterson & Marshall Karp. Little, Brown. $28 4. Find Her Lisa Gardner. Dutton. $27 5. Blue Danielle Steel. Delacorte. $29 6. The Nightingale Kristin Hannah. St. Martin's. $28 7. Rogue Lawyer John Grisham. Doubleday. $29 8. My Name Is Lucy Barton Elizabeth Strout.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 14, 2016
For the week ended Aug 14, compiled by Nielsen BookScan © 2016 The Nielsen Co. Fiction 1. Bullseye James Patterson & Michael Ledwidge. Little, Brown. $28 2. Sweet Tomorrows Debbie Macomber. Ballantine. $26 3. The Underground Railroad Colson Whitehead. Doubleday. $27 4. Truly Madly Guilty Liane Moriarty. Flatiron. $27 5. The Black Widow Daniel Silva. Harper. $28 6. The Woman in Cabin 10 Ruth Ware. Scout. $26 7. Dark Carousel Christine Feehan.
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