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Randy Primas

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NEWS
March 9, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By the time all the dignitaries, friends, and others close to former Camden Mayor Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr. arrived at his funeral Friday, most were done mourning. Friday's ceremony, which started with a two-hour viewing and concluded with a 90-minute "home-going" service at St. John Baptist Church in East Camden, featured more laughs than tears. It was a reunion for current and former politicians, clergy and residents. People hugged and waved from opposite sides of the church, which was filled with nearly 1,000 people.
NEWS
January 8, 1990 | By Joe Clark, Daily News Staff Writer
You might get an argument about Randall Cunningham being the Eagles' MVP. But in the minds of the 800 or so members of St. John Baptist Church in Camden, there's little doubt that Cunningham is the church's MVP - Most Valuable Parishioner. To them, the star quarterback is definitely No. 1. This was evident during St. John's 11 a.m. service yesterday when the church "went into an uproar" after it was disclosed that Cunningham was giving the church a nice little nest egg. Call it an Eagles' nest.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard H. Cummings Jr., long embroiled in city politics, has resigned as executive director of the Camden Housing Authority. Cummings, who will leave his $60,000-a-year job between August and October, submitted his resignation March 28. Contacted yesterday, Cummings, 42, whose expertise is in finance, would not discuss his plans but said that he would continue living in Camden and that he was "still committed to making a contribution in Camden....
NEWS
July 29, 2009
When the state took over Camden in 2002, it was clear that there would be no quick fixes to turn around the troubled New Jersey city. But that doesn't mean the state should remain in charge for 30 years. Theodore Davis, the chief operating officer the governor appointed to run Camden, wants the state to retain control until 2030 to give the recovery time. Three decades seems like an awfully long turnaround, even by government standards. At some point much sooner than that, the state needs to let Camden stand on its own. The state has already stayed in Camden longer than first planned.
NEWS
November 25, 2006
Camden isn't ready to go it alone. Gov. Corzine was wise this week to recommend extending state scrutiny for five more years and searching nationally for an expert financial watchdog. Continually ranked among America's poorest and most dangerous, the city reached another sorry crossroads last month. State-appointed chief operating officer Randy Primas resigned amid a fiscal feud with his superiors in Trenton. Also swirling were criticism of his four-year performance and a growing scandal involving a close ally, State Sen. Wayne Bryant (D., Camden)
NEWS
November 25, 2003 | By Rita Giordano and Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
To the people who knew him, and there were many, Joseph M. Nardi Jr. was above all a family man, a man of faith whose passion never wavered for his beloved Camden and its people. Mr. Nardi, 71, a state Superior Court judge who was mayor of Camden during one of its most turbulent periods, died Sunday at his Audubon home. He had had heart surgery two years before. To the those who yesterday mourned his passing, this son of Italian immigrants was a tireless advocate for his community and church.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
THE ELDERS OF St. John Baptist Church in Camden were horrified in the mid-'80s, when their architects and engineers told them how much it would cost to build a new church. The church leaders were informed that to build the kind of church they wanted - with the steeple and baptismal pool they had envisioned - would cost $500,000 more than budgeted. What to do? Someone remembered Warren Tanksley. He was known as a master builder with an impeccable reputation for superior work and, just as important, economy.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | By Dwight Ott, Inquirer Staff Writer
The questions electrified a forum for the three major candidates for Camden City mayor. Is interim Mayor Aaron A. Thompson a puppet of the white-controlled Camden County Democratic Party? Is Puerto Rican-born Jose Delgado so tightly connected to the Latino community that he would be unable or unwilling to represent others? Is the Rev. John Randall decisive enough to hold the post if he couldn't make a commitment and stay in the race from start to finish? The questions - angrily denounced by each of the candidates in turn two weeks ago at a forum of Camden Churches Organized for Progress - were among those that have dogged the candidates throughout the campaign.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
Randy Primas now has an office with a picture postcard view of Trenton. In January, he left Camden City Hall, with its dingy halls and watch tower, for an eight-story building with geometric sculptures of twisted aluminum tubes, colored discs and bronze spheres. As commissioner of the Department of Community Affairs, he has traded the hot seat of mayor for the fiscal armchair that he often turned to successfully, hat in hand. Primas has met regularly with mayors from various municipalities to review funding requests, is shaping a mission statement for the department and is establishing priorities to respond to the state's budget crunch.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 11, 2012 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Camden's 81-year-old City Hall is to be named after the late Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., who was the impoverished city's first African American mayor, Camden County announced Friday. Primas, who also served as the city's chief operating officer during the state takeover of Camden, died March 1 at 62 in South Carolina. The county said in a statement that a dedication ceremony would be held at noon Tuesday. The neoclassical City Hall, which has a light-gray granite facade with a 370-foot clock tower rising from a massive base, opened in 1931.
NEWS
November 9, 2012 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer
THE ELDERS OF St. John Baptist Church in Camden were horrified in the mid-'80s, when their architects and engineers told them how much it would cost to build a new church. The church leaders were informed that to build the kind of church they wanted - with the steeple and baptismal pool they had envisioned - would cost $500,000 more than budgeted. What to do? Someone remembered Warren Tanksley. He was known as a master builder with an impeccable reputation for superior work and, just as important, economy.
NEWS
March 11, 2012 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
When Randy Primas was elected Camden's mayor in 1981, the history he most wanted to make had little to do with his age (31) or his race (African American). A historical first on both counts, the gentlemanly political leader, business executive, and family man who was laid to rest Friday at Harleigh Cemetery most dearly hoped to rescue his hometown from ruin, and even restore some of its glory. If the task proved too big for Primas - as it did for every other mayor, before or since - his decades of devotion nevertheless loom large.
NEWS
March 10, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
By the time all the dignitaries, friends, and others close to former Camden Mayor Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr. arrived at his funeral Friday, most were done mourning. Friday's ceremony, which started with a two-hour viewing and concluded with a 90-minute "home-going" service at St. John Baptist Church in East Camden, featured more laughs than tears. It was a reunion for current and former politicians, clergy and residents. People hugged and waved from opposite sides of the church, which was filled with nearly 1,000 people.
NEWS
March 4, 2012 | By Reity O'Brien and Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writers
Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., 62, the first African American mayor of Camden and a prominent force for decades in the city's economic recovery efforts, died Thursday, March 1. Mr. Primas, who had bone-marrow cancer, lived in Fort Mill, S.C., at the time of his death. A member of a prominent Camden family, Mr. Primas was first elected to City Council at age 23 and was elected mayor at 31. Affable and optimistic in a city beset by crime and poverty, Mr. Primas won the support of residents and business leaders as he tried to redevelop Camden's Delaware River waterfront and restore vitality to the city's neighborhoods.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Reity O’Brien and Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Melvin R. "Randy" Primas Jr., 62, the first African American mayor of Camden and a prominent force for decades in the city's economic recovery efforts, died Thursday, March 1. Mr. Primas, who had bone-marrow cancer, lived in Fort Mill, S.C., at the time of his death. A member of a prominent Camden family, Mr. Primas was first elected to City Council at age 23 and was elected mayor at 31. Affable and optimistic in a city beset by crime and poverty, Mr. Primas won the support of residents and business leaders as he tried to redevelop Camden's Delaware River waterfront and restore vitality to the city's neighborhoods.
NEWS
August 21, 2009
The sudden resignation Monday of Camden's state-appointed chief operating officer offers Gov. Corzine a fresh chance to put the city on track for a return to local control. Like his predecessor, Randy Primas, who was a former Camden mayor when he was appointed COO in 2002, retired Judge Theodore Z. Davis is leaving the state-appointed job with mixed results. Further complicating the outlook for Camden's future was the announcement, also this week, that Luis Vega will step down as the city's state-appointed police director at the end of the month.
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