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Ransom

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NEWS
May 15, 1987 | Daily News Wire Services
President Reagan said today that he and his aides talked about paying money to win the release of American hostages, "but I never thought of that as ransom. " Reagan also said he has seen no evidence "that I've been mortally wounded" by the Iran-Contra scandal and that Americans do not "seem to be unhappy about what we've been doing here. " Asked about a claim by his former national security adviser, Robert C. McFarlane, that Reagan had approved paying $2 million in bribes and ransom in an effort to free American hostages in Lebanon, Reagan said: "I am having some trouble remembering that.
NEWS
April 11, 1986 | By Robert O'Connor, Special to The Inquirer
Three gunmen have kidnapped Jennifer Guinness, the wife of a prominent Dublin banker who is distantly related to the Guinness brewing family, and demanded a ransom of $2.6 million, police announced yesterday. Jennifer Guinness, 48, was taken from her suburban Dublin home Tuesday afternoon by three armed and masked men, who, as they left, made a demand for two million Irish pounds in ransom (about $2.6 million). Guinness' husband, John, 51, is chairman of Guinness & Mahon, a Dublin merchant bank.
NEWS
January 31, 1987 | By Raymond Price
One of the most destructive pressures on government is the constant, mindless pressure to "do something. " In some cases calculated inaction is the most effective form of action. In most others doing nothing is far preferable to whatever the proponents of the latest "new idea" have in mind. Nowhere is the virtue of doing nothing greater than in certain phases of a hostage situation. In dealing with terrorists, there is a place for stern retaliatory action. But with regard to the demands of terrorist kidnappers, it must be made incandescently and even brutally clear that the government will not be budged from its commitment to do precisely nothing.
NEWS
May 6, 1993 | by Jack McGuire, Daily News Staff Writer
The three men insisted there was money in the house. But their efforts to get two men and a woman to tell them where it was were unavailing yesterday, despite torturing with a hot iron and kidnapping, police said. First a man was driven around in the trunk of his car. Then the woman and her infant daughter were driven around in the car trunk. A ransom call could not be completed because the kidnappers had chosen a pay phone that did not take incoming calls, cops said.
NEWS
November 8, 1996 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
Mel Gibson and Ron Howard, who combined for more than a half-dozen Oscars last year with "Braveheart" and "Apollo 13," join forces this year in the kidnap thriller "Ransom. " But don't expect a passel of nominations for "Ransom," a picture a little too grim and nasty for the Academy's taste. Don't expect Gibson to care, either. He already has his "Braveheart" hardware, and he pocketed $20 million up front for "Ransom. " Mel's $20 million payoff is worth mentioning insofar as "Ransom" - though billed as a suspense yarn - is really a movie about the widely heralded split in this society between the Haves and the Haven'ts.
NEWS
June 5, 2003 | By L. Stuart Ditzen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Through a scratchy cell-phone connection, a man's voice told a frightened Barbara Pratt that he had her granddaughter and that it would cost "a hundred and fifty" to get the child back. "A hundred and fifty dollars?" Pratt asked. No, the man told her. He wanted $150,000. "Or they was going to kill my granddaughter. " Barbara Pratt yesterday told the harrowing story of the kidnapping in July of 7-year-old Erica Pratt as a trial began in Common Pleas Court for James Burns, 30, one of two men accused of abducting the girl.
NEWS
March 27, 1986 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Two men have been charged with conspiracy and receiving stolen property after police said that they attempted to collect $2,000 in ransom Friday by saying they were being held hostage. Police said Keith Paddyfoot, 24, of Rhinecliff, N.Y., and Brian Jarratt, 19, of the 2200 block of Grubbs Mill Road, Berwyn, told Paddyfoot's family on Friday that they had been kidnapped and would be released if the family sent $2,000 to the Western Union office in Paoli. The family reported the incident to New York state police, who contacted Pennsylvania state police in Embreeville, Chester County.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1996 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
An ambulance works its way down Fifth Avenue, sirens screaming, the wintry trees of Central Park to one side, the luxury apartments of Manhattan's elite on the other. So begins Ransom, announcing from the outset that disaster can strike anyone, any time. Even the Mullen family - an airline CEO, his wife and their young son - ensconced in a penthouse with Hopper paintings and designer furniture, is not immune. And sure enough, in a quietly chilling abduction that occurs in broad daylight in Central Park, towheaded Sean Mullen (Brawley Nolte, son of Nick)
NEWS
October 28, 2012 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writers
Nicknames used in a ransom note were critical clues that helped Upper Merion police crack the weeklong mystery that gripped the region and Asian Indians around the world after Monday's discovery of the throat-slashed body of 61-year-old Satayrathi Venna, and the disappearance of her 10-month-old granddaughter Saanvi. On Friday, law enforcement announced the baby's body was discovered around 4:30 a.m. in an unused basement sauna at the Marquis Apartments in King of Prussia, where she and her father, Venkata Konda "Siva" Venna, and mother, Chenchu "Latha" Punuru, shared a sixth-floor apartment.
NEWS
December 9, 1986 | BY ADRIAN LEE
"As low a price as possible," cautioned Thomas Jefferson, as he dispatched his negotiators to ransom U.S. seamen from the clutches of the Muslim terrorists of his day. Good advice, a commendable regard for the taxpayer's dollar, but since the Barbary pirates had the keys to the dungeons and Jefferson didn't, it didn't cut much ice in Barbary. Jefferson was to learn, as Ronald Reagan has, to endure the chafing "degrading yoke" of having to pay off terrorists to get his people back.
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BUSINESS
April 3, 2015 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
It can happen to anyone, including the tech-savvy. You click on a seemingly harmless link, or don't even know what went wrong. Suddenly, you lose access to your own computer, and all your crucial files - or, even worse, files shared by a business. How much would you pay to regain control? Market testing by the bad guys - yes, the tools of capitalism thrive in the Net's back alleys, just as in Silicon Valley - seems to suggest that consumers will pay from $500 to $700 for an outright ransom demand, and that businesses might fork over thousands.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
Board of Revision of Taxes members must be pleased that their work slowdown buffaloed City Council into giving them whopping raises. Now that they've extracted even more public money for their part-time positions, they're actually doing their jobs again. Before the raises, the members' pay ranged from $150 a day to $70,000 a year, and the board was processing about 150 appeals a week. But now that Council has caved and put them all in the $70,000 club, they've quadrupled their output, processing about 600 appeals a week.
NEWS
February 28, 2014 | BY JOHN CORRIGAN, Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN Christian Ross reported that his 4-year-old son, Charley, had been kidnapped, Philadelphia police officers told him that drunks had probably taken the boy and would return him once they sobered up. It wasn't until three days later, when Ross received a letter asking for money in exchange for the boy's return, that police realized that they had a new kind of crime on their hands. It was the summer of 1874, and the first recorded kidnapping for ransom in America had struck the Ross family of Germantown.
NEWS
August 16, 2013 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
AS A CITY prosecutor yesterday told a judge of the multiple disciplinary infractions racked up by Montana Bell in jail since 2011, the defendant looked up and smiled. Bell, 21, had tried to bribe a guard, made crude sexual comments to female guards, threatened a social worker, failed to follow orders and assaulted other inmates, Assistant District Attorney Mark Levenberg told Common Pleas Judge Lillian Ransom. Still, none of that is why Bell was in court. The convicted drug dealer, formerly of Adams Avenue near Orthodox Street, was being sentenced for murdering a woman on July 11, 2011, during a dispute over pills and money.
NEWS
July 5, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"A HIJACKING" turns the pirate capture of a Danish freighter into a controlled, slow-motion thriller that somehow holds you in its chilly trance. One of its odd choices is perspective: Director Tobias Lindholm chooses to tell much of the story from the point of view of the man, Peter (Soren Malling), who runs the shipping company. We meet him as he's confronting some prospective Japanese clients with hard-nosed negotiating tactics - a prologue that defines Peter's no-nonsense personality, and serves as a foil for the more harrowing negotiations to follow.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ernest L. Ransome III, 86, of Okatie, S.C., and formerly of Camden County, a nationally ranked college athlete who earned the 1995 Ike Grainger Award from the U.S. Golf Association for more than 25 years of volunteer work, died Sunday, May 5, at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. A 16-year resident of Okatie, he previously resided at Pine Valley Golf Club in Pine Valley, Camden County, a daughter, Elizabeth Ransome, said Tuesday. Mr. Ransome since 1988 had been board chairman of his family firm, Giles & Ransome Inc., distributor of heavy construction equipment, with headquarters in Bensalem.
NEWS
January 31, 2013 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
On March 1, 1932, the 20-month-old son of the aviator Charles A. Lindbergh was kidnapped for ransom from the family's Hunterdon County, N.J., mansion in a crime that stunned the nation and remains the subject of doubt and speculation more than 80 years later. Now the PBS science program Nova is weighing in on the case, relying on behavioral science and forensics to try to solve it. But, as in past efforts, the program, scheduled to air at 9 p.m. Wednesday on WHYY TV12, offers answers to some questions but raises others as well.
SPORTS
December 27, 2012 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
UGUETH URBINA was released from prison on Saturday after serving about 5 1/2 years of his 14-year sentence. Time off for good behavior, they said. What was his crime? He tried to slice and burn two farm workers suspected of trespassing on his family's Venezuelan ranch. The attack came just 2 weeks after Urbina pitched two-thirds of an inning in the Phillies' final game of 2005. In what was his last big-league season, Urbina went 4-3 with a save and a 4.13 ERA for the Phils. He came to Philadelphia along with Ramon Martinez from Detroit in June in exchange for Placido Polanco, who was traded so that a young Chase Utley could get more at-bats.
NEWS
November 27, 2012 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
RAGHUNANDAN "Raghu" Yandamuri had money troubles. After losing $50,000 gambling at casinos and running up a $26,268 debt on nine credit cards, the software engineer filed for bankruptcy in California and moved to Pennsylvania for a fresh start. Now, Yandamuri no doubt longs for the days when debt was his worst problem. On Wednesday, he'll be in court in Montgomery County to answer charges that he murdered a baby girl and her grandmother last month in their King of Prussia apartment in a failed ransom scheme.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Rashivar Karnati didn't know. He shared an apartment in San Jose, Calif., with Raghunandan Yandamuri in 2011, but could recall only one time his roommate visited a casino in Reno. Chendu Tummala had met Yandamuri years earlier in undergraduate school in India. Long after both men moved to the United States, they still hewed to Indian traditions and would never have discussed Yandamuri's gambling problem. "Asking financial information is not a good thing," Tummala told me. "We didn't even know he had filed for bankruptcy.
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