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Raoul Wallenberg

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NEWS
October 15, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / HINDA SCHUMAN
The Bucks County commissioners last week issued a proclamation honoring Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat credited with saving an estimated 90,000 Hungarian Jews during World War II. At the presenting of the proclamation were (from left) Andrew Warren, chairman of the commissioners; Melanie Kaneff of Churchville; Kathy Goodkin of Lawrenceville, whose mother was saved by Wallenberg, and Ilene Munetz-Pachman of Richboro, who headed the drive to honor the diplomat. Wallenberg is believed to have died while under arrest in the Soviet Union.
NEWS
September 29, 1988 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Adam Sundor stood calmly amid the chaos outside the gates of JFK Stadium, a placard hoisted high in the air and a school tie knotted tightly against the collar of his blue Oxford shirt. The tie might reflect well, he said, if the police were called to remove him. To those who asked, he explained that he was at the Human Rights Now! concert to call attention to Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat who personally saved 20,000 Hungarian Jews during World War II before the Soviets arrested him in 1945.
NEWS
August 4, 2012 | By Ilene Munetz Pachman
As I sat across from Raoul Wallenberg's half-sister, Nina Lagergren, at a hotel in Stockholm years ago, she breathed fresh truth into what would have been a cliché coming from most others: "The hope is with the young. "   Back in 1944, her older brother had put his life on the line for the young, declaring in Budapest, Hungary, "I have come to save a nation; I must save the children first. " Sent by the U.S. War Refugee Board, he saved as many as 100,000 Hungarian Jewish men, women, and children in just six months.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Filmmakers seeking an elliptical image of the Holocaust often focus on trains clattering innocently across the landscape toward an awful destination. In his remarkable and unsparing Good Evening, Mr. Wallenberg, Swedish director Kjell Grede begins on the same track and then takes us in a different direction. A carefree young businessman named Raoul Wallenberg, scion of a Swedish banking family and not one to dispute the assessment that he is an unambitious mediocrity, sits in the dining car of a train halted at a station in Hungary.
NEWS
December 3, 1993
If the U.S. Postal Service can put Elvis' (younger) face on a postage stamp, why can't a similar honor go to a man credited with saving as many as 100,000 Hungarian Jews during World War II? As the Citizens' Stamp Advisory Committee meets today to discuss future stamp programs, Ilene Munetz Pachman is praying that Raoul Wallenberg will make it to the short list. Ms. Pachman, a Bucks County woman, has created a national movement to lobby for a stamp commemorating Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat and honorary U.S. citizen who risked his life to help Jews escape the death sentence of the Holocaust.
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than four years, Ilene Munetz Pachman spent every available spare moment working to persuade the United States Postal Service to honor Raoul Wallenberg with a stamp. She considered it an "effort of love. " On Wednesday, her work paid off. The Richboro, Bucks County, woman was invited to Washington to help unveil a stamp design celebrating Wallenberg's work to save as many as 100,000 Hungarian Jews during World War II. Wallenberg was a Swedish envoy to Hungary in 1944.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This story, which ends Thursday in Washington, began more than 50 years ago in the bitter poverty of a Jewish ghetto in Hungary. It was there that Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat with a U.S. college degree in architecture, devised plans that saved 100,000 Jews during World War II. Thanks in part to the efforts of Richboro resident Ilene Munetz Pachman, Wallenberg will be commemorated on a U.S. stamp after a ceremony Thursday at the...
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eileen Flanagan offers one good reason for teaching eighth graders about Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat who led efforts to save the lives of thousands of Hungarian Jews in the final months of World War II. Young people "have to find heroes," said Flanagan, a teacher at Waldron Mercy Academy in Lower Merion. "In the middle of that horribleness - the war and the Holocaust - you find someone who doesn't care what happens to him. I call him a hero. " Yesterday, a dozen teachers explored ways to make Wallenberg's heroism relevant to youngsters who have seen Saving Private Ryan and read The Diary of Anne Frank and therefore think they know all they need to know about war and genocide.
NEWS
January 18, 1992 | by Anthony S. Twyman, Daily News Staff Writer
For the 30 people who held a candlelight vigil on Independence Square last night, the biting cold was a vivid reminder of what Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg has endured since he was arrested by the Soviets 47 years ago. "It's freezing out here. But we feel if we come together in this cold, he's probably in a very cold place also and it's a reaching out to him and a reaching out to God," said Leona Feldman, president of The American Raoul Wallenberg Committee. On Jan. 17, 1945, Wallenberg was arrested in Budhapest, Hungary, by the Soviets, after saving tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews from Nazi death camps during World War II by issuing them protective diplomatic passports.
NEWS
June 1, 1993
RENDELL LAUDS ALLIES IN EFFORTS TO KEEP BASES OPEN I thank you for the positive comments regarding our efforts to fight the recommendations of the Defense Department to consolidate various military functions out of Philadelphia and into the middle part of the state. We presented a strong case to the Base Closure Commission that this recommendation is wrong-headed and would indeed cost the Pentagon money. However, I must comment on the implicit suggestion that the political community has not rallied around this important issue.
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NEWS
August 4, 2012 | By Ilene Munetz Pachman
As I sat across from Raoul Wallenberg's half-sister, Nina Lagergren, at a hotel in Stockholm years ago, she breathed fresh truth into what would have been a cliché coming from most others: "The hope is with the young. "   Back in 1944, her older brother had put his life on the line for the young, declaring in Budapest, Hungary, "I have come to save a nation; I must save the children first. " Sent by the U.S. War Refugee Board, he saved as many as 100,000 Hungarian Jewish men, women, and children in just six months.
NEWS
May 29, 2012
13 children killed in Qatar blaze DOHA, Qatar - Qatar's Interior Ministry said 13 children were among 19 people killed in a fire that broke out Monday in one of the country's fanciest shopping malls, raising questions about building safety in the booming Gulf state. At least some of the victims died as rescuers struggled to reach a child-care center at the Villaggio mall in the capital, Doha, according to Qatar's minister of state for interior affairs, Sheik Abdullah bin Nasser al-Thani.
NEWS
May 8, 2011 | By Carolyn Davis, Inquirer Staff Writer
Morris H. Wolff was back at his alma mater, Germantown Friends School, Friday to teach anyone who would listen about a Swedish diplomat and humanitarian hero named Raoul Wallenberg. Wolff, 74, gave two lessons at once. The overt one was about Wallenberg, a Christian who helped save as many as 100,000 Hungarian Jews from Nazi execution during World War II. The other was about Wolff himself and how passion can fuel a life. Wolff has spent much of the last 28 years, since Wallenberg's brother phoned to ask for his help, trying to hold the Soviet Union and the current Russian government accountable for Wallenberg - and seeking the truth about what happened to him. "I think he's still alive," Wolff says.
NEWS
April 30, 2011 | By DAVID FOSTER, fosterd@phillynews.com 484-631-5931
Raoul Wallenberg might just be one of the greatest heroes of World War II. Disguised as a Swedish diplomat, Wallenberg left his posh Scandinavian life in July 1944 to rescue more than 100,000 Jews in Hungary during the Holocaust. The then 32-year-old would secretly distribute counterfeit Swedish passports into the pockets of Jews who were boarded on trains headed to the deadly Auschwitz concentration camp from Budapest. Wallenberg would then belligerently confront the guards, risking his life, ordering the release of the imitation Swedish citizens and bringing them back to safe houses he owned in Budapest.
NEWS
May 11, 2008 | By Jan L. Apple FOR THE INQUIRER
In 1935, Vera Herman Goodkin, then 5, overheard a conversation between her mother and maternal grandmother in her home in Czechoslovakia. Her grandmother cautioned that European Jews were in danger and that the family should consider leaving the Carpathian Mountains, a place they had inhabited for five generations. "My mother said it would never happen here [in Czechoslovakia]. She never forgave herself for those words," recalled Goodkin, author of the memoir In Sunshine and in Shadow: We Remember Them, published in 2006.
NEWS
March 16, 2002 | By Connie Langland INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Eileen Flanagan offers one good reason for teaching eighth graders about Raoul Wallenberg, the Swedish diplomat who led efforts to save the lives of thousands of Hungarian Jews in the final months of World War II. Young people "have to find heroes," said Flanagan, a teacher at Waldron Mercy Academy in Lower Merion. "In the middle of that horribleness - the war and the Holocaust - you find someone who doesn't care what happens to him. I call him a hero. " Yesterday, a dozen teachers explored ways to make Wallenberg's heroism relevant to youngsters who have seen Saving Private Ryan and read The Diary of Anne Frank and therefore think they know all they need to know about war and genocide.
NEWS
November 8, 1998 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Riding the train home from New York City, Bobbie Shaffner said, she was struck by the beauty of Philadelphia after dark. The view from her passenger window as the train pulled into 30th Street Station caused her to exclaim, "This is the city I love. " Those were words of inspiration to her husband, fellow traveler and would-be songwriter Henry Shaffner. "We realized that we had the first line to a song. It became our first song, 'Philadelphia, Philly I Love You,' " Bobbie Shaffner said.
NEWS
April 22, 1997 | By Chris Seper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
This story, which ends Thursday in Washington, began more than 50 years ago in the bitter poverty of a Jewish ghetto in Hungary. It was there that Raoul Wallenberg, a Swedish diplomat with a U.S. college degree in architecture, devised plans that saved 100,000 Jews during World War II. Thanks in part to the efforts of Richboro resident Ilene Munetz Pachman, Wallenberg will be commemorated on a U.S. stamp after a ceremony Thursday at the...
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For more than four years, Ilene Munetz Pachman spent every available spare moment working to persuade the United States Postal Service to honor Raoul Wallenberg with a stamp. She considered it an "effort of love. " On Wednesday, her work paid off. The Richboro, Bucks County, woman was invited to Washington to help unveil a stamp design celebrating Wallenberg's work to save as many as 100,000 Hungarian Jews during World War II. Wallenberg was a Swedish envoy to Hungary in 1944.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 1994 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Filmmakers seeking an elliptical image of the Holocaust often focus on trains clattering innocently across the landscape toward an awful destination. In his remarkable and unsparing Good Evening, Mr. Wallenberg, Swedish director Kjell Grede begins on the same track and then takes us in a different direction. A carefree young businessman named Raoul Wallenberg, scion of a Swedish banking family and not one to dispute the assessment that he is an unambitious mediocrity, sits in the dining car of a train halted at a station in Hungary.
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