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Rap

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NEWS
January 30, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Anti-rap crusader C. DeLores Tucker's lawyers didn't listen to the lyrics before claiming that the words of slain rap superstar Tupac Shakur defamed their client, a former Pennsylvania secretary of state. This was a big mistake, because the lawyers got the allegedly offensive lyrics "flat out wrong," according to a federal judge in Philadelphia. U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter yesterday dismissed Tucker's $10 million defamation case against the rap star's estate and the estate's lawyer, Richard Fischbein.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1991 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Outside O'Hara's restaurant at 39th and Chestnut, about 20 expensively dressed young men are having a shoving match over the comparative virtues of rappers Three Times Dope and Steady B. The sounds of their argument are heard inside, where Penn students are uneasily tucking into lunch. Eventually, one patron sidles up to the manager, who like the busboys, is watching the fracas with his nose against the glass. "Excuse me," she asks. "But are we . . . safe in here?" "Oh sure," he says.
NEWS
September 20, 1986 | By Jack Burditt, Los Angeles Daily News
In football, a "rap" has long been known as a strong defensive weapon, a blow to the side of the helmet to let the opponent know you're there and thinking of him. Los Angeles Raiders defensive back Lester Hayes is a master rapper, perhaps the player most feared by scampering wide receivers throughout the league. But these days Hayes is doing a different rap - to music. Hayes is just one of 26 Raiders who rap, rock and dance in "The Silver/ Black Attack," a record and video.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | BY ANTHONY D. JOHNSON
I've always admired men and women whose legacy included theological speeches and/or poetic writings, forever transcending their accomplishments. Men like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whose "Mountaintop" speech moved a people, and women like Maya Angelou, whose poem, "On the Pulse of Morning," touched this great nation. Gangsta cap now has society moving . . . and ducking . . . and praying. From urban battlefields, to Town Watch communities, gangsta rap is making its way into every home, unexpectedly - by someone trusted with a key. The unimaginable horror committed by the 13-year-old and 11-year-old boys who gunned down a schoolteacher and four students in Jonesboro, Ark., reflects the suppressed nightmares of torment-ridden parents, shouldering the responsibility of raising what society has dubbed a "difficult child.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1990 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
"There's a lotta kids today," says Quincy Jones, "who figure, 'Hey, I'm gonna go for the gold 'til I'm 16, and if I live past 20, that's great.' " This is not an optimistic assessment. "What we have to do," he continues, "is provide an alternative to the glass pipe. 'Just Say No' doesn't mean anything in the inner city. It's coming from someplace else - well-intended, but naive. The only people who get someone's attention there are rappers like Ice-T, who's saying you can get killed if you wear the wrong colors.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
KINGSTON, JAMAICA - King Stitt, a pioneer in rap reggae, died yesterday in his Caribbean homeland of Jamaica. He was 72. Stitt died at his home in the capital of Kingston after a long fight with prostate cancer and diabetes, said Jamaican musicologist Bunny Goodison, who was a close friend to the performer for more than 50 years. Stitt had recently been discharged from a public hospital. The entertainer, known offstage as Winston Sparks, started his musical career in the late 1950s on Kingston's circuit of sound systems, a sort of portable disco.
NEWS
September 19, 1996
There's a message in the death, life and art of rapper Tupac Shakur for those too offended by his violent, profane and misogynous behavior ever to listen to his work. It bears being heard by parents and all adult members of the Tupac Is a Thug club. They may not realize that rap or hip-hop music is one of the major styles popular among those twenty-something and younger, regardless of race, income or locale. Gangsta rap, Shakur's style, is a subset whose appeal is strongest among young black people in cities but probably will be heard by your child at some point.
NEWS
September 17, 2002
AH, SUSAN Sarandon - Hollywood intellectual and iconoclast. Let's consider what it is that makes her worthy of a multi-page spread in the Daily News (Sept. 9). She is an admitted drug user. She admits to having indulged in pre-marital sex in college. (I believe the old fashioned word for that is "fornication. ") She had an "affair" while married. (I believe the old-fashioned word for that is "adultery. ") She now lives - unmarried - with a man who fathered a couple of her children.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
You may not realize this, but those teenagers stepping and sweating on the dance floor to the scratching, subversive, electronic dissonance of a Public Enemy rap are actually commenting on the ideas that Henry David Thoreau advanced in his treatise on Civil Disobedience. And, those of you who went to see Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing this summer - you may be similarly unaware that, when pizza man Sal trashes Radio Raheem's boombox, he is acting out the ancient, Platonic dialogue between the philosophers and the poets.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
There aren't that many places to go, where they come from. Mount Holly's a small town. But they have a message, and they've got to take it somewhere. Coming Off Correct, or C.O.C., is an aspiring group of rap singers on its way to a recording studio, then to Mississippi. Then, who knows where. "Our goal is to set an example that if you set your mind to something, you can achieve anything," said Harold Russell, 24, the group's producer. "A lot of people dream and don't continue with it. " C.O.C.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 1, 2014 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Camden County police officer's husband accused of leading a drug ring has a long criminal history, according to court records, including a 2006 incident in which authorities said he tried to pull a stolen 9mm handgun on a Collingswood police officer. Having a spouse with a record does not disqualify someone from becoming a police officer, Camden County Chief Scott Thomson said this week. Criminal justice experts agree but say the gravity of the crimes and how recently they occurred should play a role.
NEWS
October 24, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Karl Jenkins - also known as hip-hot artist Dice Raw - is standing onstage at the Freedom Theatre as a whirlwind of activity goes on around him. Dancers and actors are to the left as choreographer Rennie Harris busies himself with legwork. Director Ozzie Jones is stage right, consulting writer Phillip S. Brown's script. As Dice Raw, Jenkins deals with this kind of maelstrom regularly. He's the rapping wingman for the Roots and holds down a solo career in hip-hop. But with the 2013 release of the album Jimmy's Back , Raw opened a powder keg of anti-prison rhetoric, one set to explode onstage Friday and Saturday at Freedom, when his performance art/hip-hop musical/dance presentation The Last Jimmy debuts at the North Philadelphia venue.
NEWS
September 29, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
"What's a brush? What's a comb? What's a bad hair day? Can you please remind me?" Tom Gillin, a bald cancer patient, raps into a mirror with an equally bald doctor at his side. Both are sporting curly blond wigs. "I celebrate my time here," Gillin says later in his music video about life with cancer at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. A 19-year-old who was discharged from the hospital Sept. 12 after five months of care for leukemia, Gillin created a parody rap video to two of Jay Z's songs.
NEWS
August 8, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
ANORTH Philadelphia man learned the hard way earlier this week that his three years of successfully dodging the law on a murder rap couldn't last forever. Especially if he kept picking up new arrests and showing up at the Criminal Justice Center at 13th and Filbert streets - a place swarming with cops on any given day - for court hearings. Dante Hill, 25, of Oxford Street near 17th, went to the center Tuesday for a court hearing on drug charges, police said. Hill, a punk with a lengthy rap sheet, didn't make it out of the courthouse as a free man this time: Outside the courtroom on the sixth floor, he was met by police who arrested him in the 2011 shooting homicide of Raseen Wright, 34, at 13th and Brown streets, said Officer Christine O'Brien, a police spokeswoman.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
The New Jersey Supreme Court on Monday upheld an appeals court ruling ordering a new trial on attempted-murder charges for a Burlington County man, saying prosecutors unfairly used violent rap lyrics he wrote as evidence against him. The justices agreed with the lower court that the 13 pages of material written by Vonte Skinner at least four years before he allegedly shot a man in Willingboro were not relevant and should not have been used at his...
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE LYRICS Vonte Skinner scribbled in his notebooks weren't pretty, but the New Jersey Supreme Court said the rhymes about "bloodshed, death, maiming and dismemberment" shouldn't have been used as evidence against him. Skinner, 36, of Burlington Township, remains in prison, accused of shooting Lamont Peterson in Willingboro on Nov. 8, 2005, but the Supreme Court ruled yesterday that his rap lyrics could not be used as evidence when the Burlington County...
NEWS
July 18, 2014
I HATE "urban music," whether it's rap, hip-hop, gangsta or whatever else they're calling it these days. The brutal assault on my ears and my dignity (Beyonce, honey: Jay Z and your gynecologist should be the only ones gazing at . . . that) makes me wonder what Langston Hughes, James Baldwin and Zora Neale Hurston would think of the trashy mess. When I wrote something similar a few years ago, I got called a lot of things that would fit right in with an urban melody. I also, predictably, was labeled a racist because, as everyone knows, you cannot malign rap, etc., without also wanting to repeal the 13th Amendment.
NEWS
June 27, 2014 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Democrat William Hughes Jr. questioned Rep. Frank LoBiondo for employing a lobbyist for transportation-sector unions Wednesday even as the South Jersey Republican serves as a senior member on the House committee overseeing transportation policy. The attack came as Hughes saw the United Auto Workers rescind its endorsement of him in his campaign to unseat LoBiondo in a district that covers parts of eight South Jersey counties. At issue is Michael Ingrao, a lobbyist who since 2008 has worked for LoBiondo's campaigns, helping him win support from unions.
NEWS
June 11, 2014 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-568-8278
WALTER SASSE, the retired mounted Philadelphia police officer awaiting trial for allegedly having a sexual affair with a high-school girl, could be in hot water again. Assistant District Attorney Kristen Kemp told Common Pleas Judge Gwendolyn Bright yesterday that Sasse, 76, was spotted hugging another teenage girl at a city horse stable. The person who spotted Sasse and the girl within the past several weeks, Kemp said, is her colleague Assistant District Attorney Catherine Smith.
NEWS
June 6, 2014 | By Sofiya Ballin, For The Inquirer
The word is ratchet . It's a slang term, derogatory, for a person or activity that is considered distasteful. To Grammy award-winning songwriter and producer Carvin Haggins, the words demeaning, destructive, disrespectful, derogatory, defamation , and debauchery come to mind when defining it. He believes ratchet , or rather the world of bad values from which it arose, is taking over our airwaves. Haggins is founder of the Ethical Music Entertainment record label.
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