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Rap

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NEWS
January 30, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Anti-rap crusader C. DeLores Tucker's lawyers didn't listen to the lyrics before claiming that the words of slain rap superstar Tupac Shakur defamed their client, a former Pennsylvania secretary of state. This was a big mistake, because the lawyers got the allegedly offensive lyrics "flat out wrong," according to a federal judge in Philadelphia. U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter yesterday dismissed Tucker's $10 million defamation case against the rap star's estate and the estate's lawyer, Richard Fischbein.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1991 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Outside O'Hara's restaurant at 39th and Chestnut, about 20 expensively dressed young men are having a shoving match over the comparative virtues of rappers Three Times Dope and Steady B. The sounds of their argument are heard inside, where Penn students are uneasily tucking into lunch. Eventually, one patron sidles up to the manager, who like the busboys, is watching the fracas with his nose against the glass. "Excuse me," she asks. "But are we . . . safe in here?" "Oh sure," he says.
NEWS
September 20, 1986 | By Jack Burditt, Los Angeles Daily News
In football, a "rap" has long been known as a strong defensive weapon, a blow to the side of the helmet to let the opponent know you're there and thinking of him. Los Angeles Raiders defensive back Lester Hayes is a master rapper, perhaps the player most feared by scampering wide receivers throughout the league. But these days Hayes is doing a different rap - to music. Hayes is just one of 26 Raiders who rap, rock and dance in "The Silver/ Black Attack," a record and video.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | BY ANTHONY D. JOHNSON
I've always admired men and women whose legacy included theological speeches and/or poetic writings, forever transcending their accomplishments. Men like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whose "Mountaintop" speech moved a people, and women like Maya Angelou, whose poem, "On the Pulse of Morning," touched this great nation. Gangsta cap now has society moving . . . and ducking . . . and praying. From urban battlefields, to Town Watch communities, gangsta rap is making its way into every home, unexpectedly - by someone trusted with a key. The unimaginable horror committed by the 13-year-old and 11-year-old boys who gunned down a schoolteacher and four students in Jonesboro, Ark., reflects the suppressed nightmares of torment-ridden parents, shouldering the responsibility of raising what society has dubbed a "difficult child.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1990 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
"There's a lotta kids today," says Quincy Jones, "who figure, 'Hey, I'm gonna go for the gold 'til I'm 16, and if I live past 20, that's great.' " This is not an optimistic assessment. "What we have to do," he continues, "is provide an alternative to the glass pipe. 'Just Say No' doesn't mean anything in the inner city. It's coming from someplace else - well-intended, but naive. The only people who get someone's attention there are rappers like Ice-T, who's saying you can get killed if you wear the wrong colors.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
KINGSTON, JAMAICA - King Stitt, a pioneer in rap reggae, died yesterday in his Caribbean homeland of Jamaica. He was 72. Stitt died at his home in the capital of Kingston after a long fight with prostate cancer and diabetes, said Jamaican musicologist Bunny Goodison, who was a close friend to the performer for more than 50 years. Stitt had recently been discharged from a public hospital. The entertainer, known offstage as Winston Sparks, started his musical career in the late 1950s on Kingston's circuit of sound systems, a sort of portable disco.
NEWS
September 19, 1996
There's a message in the death, life and art of rapper Tupac Shakur for those too offended by his violent, profane and misogynous behavior ever to listen to his work. It bears being heard by parents and all adult members of the Tupac Is a Thug club. They may not realize that rap or hip-hop music is one of the major styles popular among those twenty-something and younger, regardless of race, income or locale. Gangsta rap, Shakur's style, is a subset whose appeal is strongest among young black people in cities but probably will be heard by your child at some point.
NEWS
September 17, 2002
AH, SUSAN Sarandon - Hollywood intellectual and iconoclast. Let's consider what it is that makes her worthy of a multi-page spread in the Daily News (Sept. 9). She is an admitted drug user. She admits to having indulged in pre-marital sex in college. (I believe the old fashioned word for that is "fornication. ") She had an "affair" while married. (I believe the old-fashioned word for that is "adultery. ") She now lives - unmarried - with a man who fathered a couple of her children.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
You may not realize this, but those teenagers stepping and sweating on the dance floor to the scratching, subversive, electronic dissonance of a Public Enemy rap are actually commenting on the ideas that Henry David Thoreau advanced in his treatise on Civil Disobedience. And, those of you who went to see Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing this summer - you may be similarly unaware that, when pizza man Sal trashes Radio Raheem's boombox, he is acting out the ancient, Platonic dialogue between the philosophers and the poets.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
There aren't that many places to go, where they come from. Mount Holly's a small town. But they have a message, and they've got to take it somewhere. Coming Off Correct, or C.O.C., is an aspiring group of rap singers on its way to a recording studio, then to Mississippi. Then, who knows where. "Our goal is to set an example that if you set your mind to something, you can achieve anything," said Harold Russell, 24, the group's producer. "A lot of people dream and don't continue with it. " C.O.C.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2016 | By Allison Stewart, TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE
CHANCE THE Rapper's most significant new song doesn't even appear on his acclaimed new mixtape, Coloring Book . On the jazzy, gospel-influenced outtake "Grown A- Kid," left off the project due to difficulties with sample clearance, the Chicago emcee affirms what he'd been hinting at for years: "Everybody can finally say it out loud / My favorite rapper a Christian rapper. " It may not have seemed like a big deal, but there it was, out in the open, possibly the most overt declaration of Christian faith from a secular rapper since Kanye West's seismic single "Jesus Walks.
NEWS
May 12, 2016 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Staff Writer
Two North Philadelphia brothers accused of shooting and seriously wounding an 11-year-old bystander to avenge a street fight have been acquitted of all charges. A Common Pleas Court jury deliberated for about 21/2 hours Monday before acquitting Marcellus Temple, 27, and Jalaal Spady, 18, of aggravated assault, attempted murder, and two gun counts in the April 6, 2014, shooting that wounded Kashie Crawford. For Spady, Monday was the first time he had been out of jail since he was charged at age 16, defense attorney Leon D. Goodman said.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
Shoppers once chose supermarkets for convenience, cost, customer service and quick checkouts. But a recent study found 83 percent of consumers pick only retail outlets that look clean to them, according to supermarket guru Phil Lempert . A full third of the people he surveyed have turned around and fled stores that seemed less than pristine. So just how clean is your favorite supermarket chain? The Inquirer, as part of its Clean Plates project , examined two years of health department reports for large grocers in Philadelphia and Bucks County.
NEWS
January 30, 2016
ISSUE | CORRUPTION Street administration gets a bad rap An editorial about Philadelphia Democratic Party Chairman Bob Brady referred to the "rampant corruption of former Mayor John F. Street's administration," which it tried to demonstrate by stating that it led to 24 criminal convictions ("This bunch is Brady's," Sunday). Only one administration employee was convicted in that probe; another was acquitted. Many of those convicted were bankers and lawyers who did business with the city.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Sam Wood, STAFF WRITER
One of Philadelphia most-beloved cheesesteak joints, an outpost of the city's best-known gourmet grocer, a strip club and a franchise of a national "pizza pizza" chain were among the eateries this month to receive a drubbing - and perhaps a few well-deserved lessons - from the health department. The city's health inspectors dropped in unannounced at nearly 200 restaurants and groceries between Jan. 14 and 21. At the overwheming majority they found few violations. But several well-known eateries were dinged for a slew of minor infractions.
NEWS
December 18, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
A federal judge on Wednesday said the law firm retained by Gov. Christie's office in the George Washington Bridge lane-closure case engaged in "opacity and gamesmanship" while conducting a taxpayer-funded investigation into the matter. But U.S. District Judge Susan D. Wigenton nevertheless ruled that Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher L.L.P. did not have to turn over documents requested by two former Christie allies accused in the case, because the documents either did not exist or were not pertinent to the charges they faced.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2015 | By Sofiya Balin, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Chris Brown: One Hell of a Nite Tour on Friday night was club meets college house party. Before the show began, Michael Jackson played between each set, making it clear who Brown's primary influence is. In the pitch-black Susquehanna Bank Center, before a screaming crowd of thousands, the main screen began with a countdown, then a tour documentary with clips of Brown's year-old daughter, Royalty. He then launched with the bang that started it all, "Run It" from his 2005 debut album Chris Brown , as the visuals behind him burst with gold.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
The whole rap-metal/punk-hop thing is a fragile musical ecosystem. One overstep - too much thumb-popping bass, guitars crunching too clearly - threatens to turn you into a '90s dinosaur. No one wants to be tragically tagged as a Limp Bizkit wannabe, not even Limp Bizkit. So why did 311 - the 25-year-old Omaha ensemble - work so well when they raged Sunday across the AstroTurf lawn of Borgata Park in Atlantic City? Well, singer/guitarist Nick Hexum is still one of pop's best, most-underappreciated vocalists, and guitarist Tim Mahoney is a king of crisp garage fuzztones.
NEWS
July 17, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I'm a 24-year-old teacher and graduate student. I have started dating a new man, "Winston," who makes me feel incredible. We have crazy chemistry like I've never had before, and our personalities work perfectly together. Here's the problem. Winston is a recovering heroin addict with horrible credit and two felony charges related to having stolen money from his parents when he was desperate for drugs. I know what you're thinking - I'd be an idiot for dating someone like this, right?
NEWS
May 30, 2015 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
NEW YORK - Gov. Christie attacked President Obama over nuclear negotiations with Iran and what he cast as a weakened relationship with Israel in a speech Thursday before a crowd that included prominent Jewish guests and donors. The Republican governor, who is considering a 2016 presidential bid, described a world worsened by a "lack of American leadership," where "evil is not being met by strength. " He tried to present himself as a capable alternative, saying that while some people have criticized him as too blunt, "maybe it's time we lose some of that filter as well.
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