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Rap

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NEWS
January 30, 1999 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Anti-rap crusader C. DeLores Tucker's lawyers didn't listen to the lyrics before claiming that the words of slain rap superstar Tupac Shakur defamed their client, a former Pennsylvania secretary of state. This was a big mistake, because the lawyers got the allegedly offensive lyrics "flat out wrong," according to a federal judge in Philadelphia. U.S. District Judge Ronald L. Buckwalter yesterday dismissed Tucker's $10 million defamation case against the rap star's estate and the estate's lawyer, Richard Fischbein.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1991 | By Francesca Chapman, Daily News Staff Writer
Outside O'Hara's restaurant at 39th and Chestnut, about 20 expensively dressed young men are having a shoving match over the comparative virtues of rappers Three Times Dope and Steady B. The sounds of their argument are heard inside, where Penn students are uneasily tucking into lunch. Eventually, one patron sidles up to the manager, who like the busboys, is watching the fracas with his nose against the glass. "Excuse me," she asks. "But are we . . . safe in here?" "Oh sure," he says.
NEWS
September 20, 1986 | By Jack Burditt, Los Angeles Daily News
In football, a "rap" has long been known as a strong defensive weapon, a blow to the side of the helmet to let the opponent know you're there and thinking of him. Los Angeles Raiders defensive back Lester Hayes is a master rapper, perhaps the player most feared by scampering wide receivers throughout the league. But these days Hayes is doing a different rap - to music. Hayes is just one of 26 Raiders who rap, rock and dance in "The Silver/ Black Attack," a record and video.
NEWS
August 4, 1998 | BY ANTHONY D. JOHNSON
I've always admired men and women whose legacy included theological speeches and/or poetic writings, forever transcending their accomplishments. Men like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., whose "Mountaintop" speech moved a people, and women like Maya Angelou, whose poem, "On the Pulse of Morning," touched this great nation. Gangsta cap now has society moving . . . and ducking . . . and praying. From urban battlefields, to Town Watch communities, gangsta rap is making its way into every home, unexpectedly - by someone trusted with a key. The unimaginable horror committed by the 13-year-old and 11-year-old boys who gunned down a schoolteacher and four students in Jonesboro, Ark., reflects the suppressed nightmares of torment-ridden parents, shouldering the responsibility of raising what society has dubbed a "difficult child.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1990 | By David Hinckley, New York Daily News
"There's a lotta kids today," says Quincy Jones, "who figure, 'Hey, I'm gonna go for the gold 'til I'm 16, and if I live past 20, that's great.' " This is not an optimistic assessment. "What we have to do," he continues, "is provide an alternative to the glass pipe. 'Just Say No' doesn't mean anything in the inner city. It's coming from someplace else - well-intended, but naive. The only people who get someone's attention there are rappers like Ice-T, who's saying you can get killed if you wear the wrong colors.
NEWS
February 1, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
KINGSTON, JAMAICA - King Stitt, a pioneer in rap reggae, died yesterday in his Caribbean homeland of Jamaica. He was 72. Stitt died at his home in the capital of Kingston after a long fight with prostate cancer and diabetes, said Jamaican musicologist Bunny Goodison, who was a close friend to the performer for more than 50 years. Stitt had recently been discharged from a public hospital. The entertainer, known offstage as Winston Sparks, started his musical career in the late 1950s on Kingston's circuit of sound systems, a sort of portable disco.
NEWS
September 19, 1996
There's a message in the death, life and art of rapper Tupac Shakur for those too offended by his violent, profane and misogynous behavior ever to listen to his work. It bears being heard by parents and all adult members of the Tupac Is a Thug club. They may not realize that rap or hip-hop music is one of the major styles popular among those twenty-something and younger, regardless of race, income or locale. Gangsta rap, Shakur's style, is a subset whose appeal is strongest among young black people in cities but probably will be heard by your child at some point.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THERE HAVE been plenty of murder confessions in music - men shot in Reno just for kicks, a sheriff shot down supposedly in self-defense, and one jealous guy named Joe who spilled his guts to Jimi Hendrix before taking off for Mexico. Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" also includes a murder confession, but the two questions posed in the opening lyrics to the song, "Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy?" could also apply to the 13 pages of violent rap lyrics Vonte L. Skinner wrote before he was accused and later convicted of shooting and paralyzing a man in South Jersey.
NEWS
September 17, 2002
AH, SUSAN Sarandon - Hollywood intellectual and iconoclast. Let's consider what it is that makes her worthy of a multi-page spread in the Daily News (Sept. 9). She is an admitted drug user. She admits to having indulged in pre-marital sex in college. (I believe the old fashioned word for that is "fornication. ") She had an "affair" while married. (I believe the old-fashioned word for that is "adultery. ") She now lives - unmarried - with a man who fathered a couple of her children.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
You may not realize this, but those teenagers stepping and sweating on the dance floor to the scratching, subversive, electronic dissonance of a Public Enemy rap are actually commenting on the ideas that Henry David Thoreau advanced in his treatise on Civil Disobedience. And, those of you who went to see Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing this summer - you may be similarly unaware that, when pizza man Sal trashes Radio Raheem's boombox, he is acting out the ancient, Platonic dialogue between the philosophers and the poets.
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NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
TRENTON New Jersey Supreme Court justices gave a skeptical hearing Wednesday to a Burlington County prosecutor's argument that violent rap lyrics written by Vonte Skinner four or five years before he shot a man in Willingboro were relevant and admissible at his 2008 trial. Justice Barry T. Albin pointedly asked Assistant Prosecutor Jennifer Paszkiewicz: "I'm asking you, how you can justify taking lyrics four to five years old . . . and somehow show they reveal a motive for a crime that occurs four to five years later?"
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Despite Donald Glover's pedigree as a writer for 30 Rock and his starring role on Community , there's nothing funny about his rap alter ego, Childish Gambino, and albums like Camp . Caustically witty and weirdly metaphorical with an oddly jagged sound track, yes, but hardly the stuff of stand-up or sketch comedy. Then again, during Gambino's Electric Factory show Friday, you couldn't help sensing this was performance art, with its drawing-room set and e-speak projections in accordance with the backstory of his album Because the Internet of a tweet-happy socialite bugging out in his mansion.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
A 12-YEAR-OLD BOY was jumped, assaulted and robbed by four teens who stole his sandwich and french fries Friday in Upper Darby, according to police. Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood said yesterday that the 12-year-old victim, who is a "real nice neighborhood kid," was coming out of a convenience store on Long Lane near Clinton Road about 5 p.m. when four "morons" hit him, knocked him to the ground and "thumped" him. They stole the food, the only possessions the boy had on him, Chitwood said.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THERE HAVE been plenty of murder confessions in music - men shot in Reno just for kicks, a sheriff shot down supposedly in self-defense, and one jealous guy named Joe who spilled his guts to Jimi Hendrix before taking off for Mexico. Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" also includes a murder confession, but the two questions posed in the opening lyrics to the song, "Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy?" could also apply to the 13 pages of violent rap lyrics Vonte L. Skinner wrote before he was accused and later convicted of shooting and paralyzing a man in South Jersey.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | By Howard Gensler
YO, MACKLEMORE , Drake thinks your Instagram apology to Kendrick Lamar over your rap Grammy win was "wack. " Actually, he said, "that s--- was wack as f---. " "I was like, 'You won. Why are you posting your text message?' " Drake tells Rolling Stone . "Just chill. Take your W, and if you feel you didn't deserve it, go get better - make better music. It felt cheap. It didn't feel genuine. Why do that? Why feel guilt? You think those guys would pay homage to you if they won?"
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | By Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA On the streets of West Philadelphia, the 14-year-old goes by his nickname, "Jon Jon. " To police, he is known as something else: a repeat offender who likes to rob people with guns near the apartment where he lives with his mother. In August 2012, when he was 13, Jon Jon was arrested for a series of gunpoint robberies near 46th and Market Streets, including the daylight stickup of a Philadelphia Daily News crime reporter. Charged as a juvenile, he told police he used a BB gun in those crimes.
NEWS
October 30, 2013 | By Angela Couloumbis, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - State Treasurer Rob McCord called on Gov. Corbett on Monday to scrap his bid to privatize management of the Pennsylvania Lottery, arguing that the administration has already spent almost $3.5 million on legal fees and consultants on a "misguided" effort. That number is bound to rise if the administration continues its quest to bring in the British firm Camelot Global Services to run the lottery, which helps fund programs for senior citizens, said McCord, a Democrat seeking to challenge Corbett in next year's election.
NEWS
July 20, 2013 | By Sulaiman Abdur-Rahman and Dylan Purcell, Inquirer Staff Writers
The driver blamed by police for the death of a mother and three of her young children on Roosevelt Boulevard has had eight serious moving violations, from speeding to reckless driving, and had his license suspended in 2011, police said Thursday. Khusen Akhmedov, 23, of Lancaster, has been charged with four ungraded counts of murder in the deaths of Samara Banks and her children Saa'deem Griffin, 4; Saa'sean Williams, 23 months; and Saa'mir Williams, 9 months. Also charged with four counts of murder was Ahmen Holloman of Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 23, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of Chester Upland Schighhool District graduates have no delusions about the massive problems confronting a district that has been troubled for decades, but when the auditor general describes their future as "dim," Anisah Green takes exception. The 18-year-old, who plans a career in psychology, says she has control over her future, even though the official's recent report says Chester Upland has failed in its educational mission. "That still doesn't mean I can't [make]
SPORTS
May 15, 2013 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jay Harris, one of the area's top football recruits, was stripped of his scholarship by Michigan State earlier this month after he posted a series of profanity-laced rap videos on YouTube, a source said Tuesday. Under the name "Jay DatBull," the Downingtown East senior has uploaded nine videos to YouTube. Using explicit lyrics, Harris raps about drugs, with derogatory references directed at women and homosexuals. His first single, "DatBull 4 Life," surpassed 50,000 views over the weekend and appears to show Harris smoking marijuana while sitting behind the steering wheel of a car. Harris, a wide receiver, said he freely chose a rap career over football.
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