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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1986 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Private collectors and representatives of institutions here and abroad will gather at 10 this morning in the William Penn Gallery at the Franklin Institute to bid on a historic collection, the contents of the rare book room of the institute's library. The items include a rare 16th-century book by Copernicus, volumes from the collection of the chief naval engineer for Union forces in the Civil War and works on such diverse subjects as 19th-century gas lighting and metallurgy. They should provoke especially competitive bidding from Philadelphia institutions, where the feeling has been that they should have been given a chance to buy the books before they were offered at auction.
LIVING
May 23, 2008 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Freeman's auctions of rare books, manuscripts, prints and maps always offer names and nostalgia. The sale scheduled for Thursday brings a dose of naturalism, too. The names are, of course, the autographs that constitute a large number of the documents in any book sale. Among those to be offered Thursday, beginning at 10 a.m. at the gallery at 1808 Chestnut St., are two signed by Abraham Lincoln - or, in the case of one, just "A. Lincoln. " According to David Bloom, who cataloged the 660-lot sale with Joe Huenke, Lincoln used his full name when signing such documents as the military commission to be offered next week, which has a presale estimate of $3,000 to $5,000.
NEWS
August 31, 2002 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Several post-Labor Day sales will mark the start of the fall auction season. At 5 p.m. Thursday, Barry S. Slosberg will offer more than 175 lots of old, rare and valuable books at the Slosberg gallery in Port Richmond. Until now, Slosberg has not been known for its book sales, but Thursday's has some important publications, including catalogs from the bookstores run by the Rosenbach brothers (out of which the Rosenbach Museum and Library arose) and some documents of local historical significance.
NEWS
February 6, 1991 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
The only known copy of the first edition of Benjamin Franklin's Poor Richard's Almanack resides at the Rosenbach Museum and Library - a secret shared only by bookworms and bibliophiles. "It doesn't do any good to have the only known copy if no one knows you have it," said Rosenbach director Ellen S. Dunlop. Now, in a five-year, $4.1-million project, descriptions of the Almanack and other rare books and manuscripts in 16 Philadelphia-area libraries will be entered into two nationwide computerized catalogue systems.
NEWS
March 28, 1991 | By Kay Raftery, Special to The Inquirer
The shadings in the calligraphy are so clearly defined, you can tell where the scribe dipped his pen back into the well to replenish the ink. The paper is creamy white and handmade. The pages are bound into a book covered with white pigskin with the papal coat of arms etched in gold, red and blue across the front. It is titled The Order of Mass. The book was commissioned in 1979 for Pope John Paul II's visit to Philadelphia and was retired after he used it to say two public Masses.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | By Lucinda Fleeson, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bow-tied and fiercely whiskered, Edwin Wolf 2d is bombastic, hyperbolic, charming, irascible and razor-witted. His friends and colleagues, of whom there are many, say he can be the most generous, patient scholar and teacher imaginable - and occasionally the most cantankerous. "He's fun to work with, and there were times I wanted to strangle him," recalls Marie Korey, head of the rare-book department of the Free Library of Philadelphia, who worked with Wolf at the Library Company for 11 years and co- edited several major projects with him. The "Legacies of Genius" exhibition of rare books was conceived by Wolf, 76, and he served both as guest curator and as editor of the lush 266-page catalogue.
LIVING
May 22, 2009 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Freeman's will be busy next week with two catalog sales: one devoted to rare books, maps, prints, and autographs; the next for a private collection that will partly benefit the Fox Chase Cancer Center. More than 600 lots of books will be sold beginning at 10 a.m. Thursday at the gallery at 1808 Chestnut St. The most unusual of the rare books is a signed typescript of Pat Conroy's first novel, The Great Santini, bound in crushed morocco with stylized silver and leather onlay representations of fighter jets, signifying the occupation of the title figure, a military pilot.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | By Peter Landry, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two rare books with historical connections to Benjamin Franklin have been stolen from the Van Pelt Library on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania, police said last night. The books, housed in the sixth-floor repository for rare documents at the library at 34th and Walnut Streets, have a combined value of $35,000 to $60,000, library officials told police. One of the books actually is two documents bound as one, police said. "A Sermon on Education," written by Richard Peters and printed in 1751 by Franklin, was bound with a Franklin pamphlet titled "An Idea of an English School.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The executors of Maurice Sendak's will have not complied with his wishes to bequeath his multimillion-dollar rare-book collection to the Rosenbach Museum and Library and for the revered author and illustrator's work to continue to be displayed at the Rosenbach. So claims a lawsuit filed last week in northern Fairfield County, Conn., in which the Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia asks the state's probate court to compel individuals who overlap as executors of the estate and officers of the Maurice Sendak Foundation to carry out Sendak's wishes.
NEWS
January 20, 1990 | By Leon Taylor and Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writers
Antiques have gotten the man accused of stealing two valuable Ben Franklin tomes into trouble before. According to the curator of Mission Santa Ines in Solvang, Calif., William March Witherell was acquitted by reason of insanity in 1977 after he was caught red-handed with a rare book of Gregorian chants and a small painting titled "Madonna in Prayer. " A federal magistrate yesterday ordered psychiatric tests for Witherell, 39, of San Gabriel, Calif., charged in the theft of $60,000 worth of Frankliniana from the University of Pennsylvania last summer.
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NEWS
January 2, 2015 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The value of 800 rare books at the center of a legal dispute between the executors of Maurice Sendak's will and the Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia is estimated at $1.65 million, according to a figure offered by the Sendak estate in probate court filings. But the Rosenbach, which is suing Sendak's estate, puts the value much higher. The financial report sketches out the scale and value of the collection over which the Rosenbach filed its lawsuit. Sendak's will calls for the Rosenbach to receive all of his rare books, but the Sendak estate has turned over only 349 of the 800 volumes, with that portion valued at $720,000.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The question has lingered in song since it was first posed in the 1960s: How many roads must a man walk down - before he becomes the subject of a major university archive devoted to helping researchers discern the meaning of his every move and utterance? The answer, my friends, ain't blowin' in the wind. The answer is at La Salle University, which runs what it believes to be the nation's only academic collection focused on songwriter, poet, and troubadour Bob Dylan. Dylan will come to Philadelphia this week to perform three shows at the Academy of Music, his first Center City appearance since 1963.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | By Peter Dobrin, Inquirer Culture Writer
The executors of Maurice Sendak's will have not complied with his wishes to bequeath his multimillion-dollar rare-book collection to the Rosenbach Museum and Library and for the revered author and illustrator's work to continue to be displayed at the Rosenbach. So claims a lawsuit filed last week in northern Fairfield County, Conn., in which the Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia asks the state's probate court to compel individuals who overlap as executors of the estate and officers of the Maurice Sendak Foundation to carry out Sendak's wishes.
NEWS
January 27, 2014 | Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Elke M. Shihadeh, 78, of Ardmore, an expert in the art of hand bookbinding and historic-document restoration, died of pneumonia Wednesday, Jan. 15, at home. The former Elke Nissen practiced the highly specialized craft of restoring rare books with her husband, Fred H. Shihadeh, from her early 20s into her 70s. Mrs. Shihadeh had a special expertise in the restoration of damaged papers of historical significance. She personally restored the broadsides announcing the Declaration of Independence.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Step off the elevator into the University of Pennsylvania's hallowed rare-book room at the Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, and you immediately recognize something is different. Where's the wood? Van Pelt is notorious for being one of Philadelphia's harsher examples of '60s-era Brutalist architecture, with walls made of bare concrete block and prison-size windows, and yet its rare-book room was always decorated as though it were part of some English manor house. Deeply carved, 16th-century oak paneling greeted visitors in the entryway.
NEWS
April 30, 2013
The planned alliance of Philadelphia's rare-book collectors' mecca - the Rosenbach Museum and Library - with the Free Library of Philadelphia could mean greater access to literary treasures, in much the same way as the Barnes Foundation art masterpieces' move downtown. Even better, the library merger looks to bring nothing like the messy, emotionally wrenching legal battles surrounding the Barnes' move. The ease of the union can be credited, in large part, to the foresight of the Rosenbach founders, who established their legacy under a reasonable and flexible bequest wholly unlike the Barnes' strict directives.
NEWS
April 23, 2013 | BY SIOBHAN A. REARDON & DERICK DREHER
PHILADELPHIA IS A city rich with world-class cultural institutions, and its citizens benefit tremendously when these organizations partner to present engaging programming and draw connections across collections of art, music, literature and more. The Free Library of Philadelphia and The Rosenbach Museum & Library are both dedicated to preserving and sharing literary history through public engagement with rich and unique special collections. As such, we were so proud this past week to announce a joint decision to merge our operations, creating The Rosenbach of the Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation, and thereby one of the greatest collections of rare books, manuscripts, Americana and art anywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2013 | By Ula Ilnytzky, Associated Press
NEW YORK - A tiny hymnal from 1640 believed to be the first book ever printed in what is now the United States is going up for auction, and it could sell for as much as $30 million. Only 11 copies of the Bay Psalm Book survive, in varying degrees of completeness. Members of Boston's Old South Church have authorized the sale of one of its two copies at Sotheby's Nov. 26. "It's a spectacular book, arguably one of the most important books in this nation's history," said the Rev. Nancy Taylor, senior minister and chief executive officer of the church, which was established in 1669.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2012 | By Molly Eichel, Daily News Staff Writer
CHILDREN'S AUTHOR Maurice Sendak began his life in Brooklyn and lived in Connecticut until his death Tuesday, but his heart — his work — lives on in Philadelphia at the Rosenbach Museum and Library . The museum has more than 10,000 pieces of Sendak's work, spanning his career from the '40s to the early 21st century, and will mount a memorial exhibition in June. Reacting to the beloved author's death, the museum opened its doors for free to the public yesterday and will again Wednesday from noon to 8 p.m. The gallery is exhibiting "From Pen to Publisher: The Life of Three Sendak Picture Books.
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