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Rare Disease

NEWS
April 24, 2001 | By Michelle Jeffery INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Students at Indian Crest Junior High School will be allowed to skip classes tomorrow to attend the funeral of a 14-year-old classmate who died last week of a disease related to bacterial meningitis, a school spokeswoman said yesterday. The funeral for eighth grader Mike Musselman, who died Thursday, will be at noon at Christ Reformed Church at Indian Creek, Cowpath and Church Roads, Telford. Students must have a note from a parent to be dismissed from school, said Souderton Area School District spokeswoman Ellen Jamison.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Former Gov. Robert P. Casey, whose generation-long influence on Pennsylvania politics grew so powerful his surname became a political asset, died last night after a long hospitalization. Casey, 68, died at Mercy Hospital in Scranton. He is survived by his wife, Ellen, eight grown children and 28 grandchildren. The two-term Democratic governor died of complications related to his long battle with a rare genetic disease - familial amyloidosis - for which treatment included a heart-liver transplant in 1993.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Think forgetting to take one birth-control pill is no big deal? Think again. Missing just one pill a month decreases the pill's efficacy from nearly 100 percent to about 94 percent. Miss two or more pills, and you're rolling the dice, according to statistics from the Alan Guttmacher Institute. And it's essential not only to take the pill daily, but also to take it at the same time of day. That's probably why there are about 1 million pregnancies each year in the United States of women who are on the pill but have used it incorrectly.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | By Patricia M. La Hay, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An inmate at the Bucks County correctional facility, who had been hospitalized with respiratory problems, was diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease, county commissioners said yesterday. The unnamed inmate was reported recovering and has been returned to the prison. County Health Director Lewis D. Polk said an environmental firm that specializes in microbial identification and remediation would be at the prison today to investigate the source of the disease. Legionnaires' disease - a serious and sometimes fatal bacterial infection that causes pneumonia and flu-like symptoms - is spread through moist air from contaminated water sources, such as air-conditioning systems, showers and whirlpool baths.
NEWS
June 2, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
College freshmen living in dormitories are more likely to get lost on campus, drink more alcohol, gain more weight - and contract potentially deadly meningitis. New data from a nationwide study shows that while college students in general are not at increased risk for meningococcal disease, an inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord, freshman living in dormitories have a 6.33 times higher risk, according to findings announced yesterday at the annual meeting of the American College Health Association.
SPORTS
April 15, 1999 | By Sam Carchidi, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For years, Rico Brogna said, he didn't want anyone to know he had a rare arthritic condition. As an athlete, you never want to show opponents a sign of weakness, the Phillies' first baseman said. "And I didn't want a lot of sympathy. I just wanted to go out and play like the rest of my teammates. " Someone changed his mind. "Prodding from my mom," he said, grinning before a crowd of reporters yesterday. "Good ol' Mom. She said I might be able to help other people by creating awareness for the millions" who have the disease.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | By Josh Goldstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vicki Burks is having a good day if she can get up in the morning. She's having a good day if she can keep up with her son, 12-year-old Jimmy, and her 8-year-old daughter, Michelle, for an entire day. "A bad day for me is pain," said Burks, a 42-year-old single mother from Mount Airy who was diagnosed three years ago with amyloidosis, a rare disease that causes protein to build up in organs and other tissues. Yesterday, Burks and her children learned new ways to cope with a serious disease - and the accompanying emotional trauma - in a support group workshop at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Center City.
LIVING
September 14, 1998 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hannah Moerman's saga with infant botulism, a mysterious and rare disease that paralyzes tiny babies, began as they all do: as a complete surprise. Here was a baby who was born at full term after an uneventful pregnancy. She went home to a big house in the shady hills of Charlestown Township, Chester County. She was healthy and alert. She was thriving on her mother's breast milk. "Everything was great," her mother, Rosemary, said. On May 11, though, Rosemary Moerman sensed something was wrong.
NEWS
August 5, 1998 | By Stacey Burling, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sylvia Green, a 64-year-old South Philadelphia woman who two years ago was stricken with a debilitating neurological illness, has won a battle with her insurance company for more physical therapy. Green, who spent 19 months in the hospital undergoing treatment for Guillain-Barre syndrome, was told last spring by Keystone Health Plan East that her policy covered only 60 days of physical therapy after her discharge. Green appealed the decision, saying, with her doctor's backing, that she needed more help to make a full recovery.
NEWS
April 10, 1998 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
A few drops of Marie Noe's blood could determine whether the deaths of her children were murder, or medical malady. That's the opinion of genetic researchers in California who believe that Noe - the Philadelphia woman whose 10 children died as infants - could suffer from a rare, inheritable, hard-to-diagnose metabolic disease that sometimes results in the sudden death of the mother's children. The children were born between 1949 and 1968. One child was stillborn; another died six hours after birth.
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