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Rare Disease

NEWS
August 4, 2003 | By Dawn Fallik INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four out of five samples taken at the Parkade Building tested positive yesterday for the bacterium that causes Legionnaire's disease. But health officials said they could not confirm that the downtown Camden building was the source of a case of the illness. A 34-year-old man who works in the building has contracted the disease, and health officials at first believed that he contracted it on a trip to San Diego and Mexico. A 47-year-old man who works in the building was tested for Legionnaire's during the weekend.
NEWS
March 6, 2003 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the hospital room where Yolanda Hernandez has spent a week sleeping by her daughter Gabriela's bed, the widow who speaks no English has felt the love of strangers. A married couple from West Chester sent the Mexican woman $5,000. A Wynnewood man sent $1,000. The Mexican consul personally handed Hernandez $500. Teachers at Gabriela's high school kicked in $400. In all, several hundred Inquirer readers sent letters and donations totaling nearly $20,000 after reading how an inherited disease of the esophagus killed a Chester County landscaper and threatens the lives of the four children he left behind - two of whom have been diagnosed with the rare disease.
NEWS
February 26, 2003 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gabriela Hernandez, who underwent five hours of surgery yesterday to remove her esophagus and build another from her stomach, now has a hopeful prognosis against the rare disease that killed her father and afflicts her younger sister, surgeons said. The 15-year-old Chester County girl was in stable condition last night in the intensive-care unit at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. If all goes well for her in the next few weeks, surgeons will operate in March on 13-year-old Maria Hernandez, said John C. Kucharczuk, one of the surgeons who performed the esophagectomy at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 25, 2003 | By Maria Panaritis INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Surgeons will operate today on a radiant 15-year-old girl - a young woman with the alluring face and piercing eyes of her deceased father - and try to save her from the affliction that killed him and threatens to wipe out her family. In a daylong surgery at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, doctors will remove Gabriela Hernandez's diseased esophagus and configure a new one from her stomach. She will be dissected, piece by piece. She may die. If Gabriela's procedure is successful, the surgeons will do it all over again next month - on her little sister Maria, age 12, a shy-faced sixth-grader filled with fear.
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | By Denise Coll Minchin
I sit here at home suffering and gagging with a rare disease called glossopharyngeal neuralgia, and yet I don't feel that I am suffering at all. Not compared with the thousands of people who stand on the streets of New York holding up pictures of their loved ones, hoping and praying that they will be found in the ruins of the World Trade Center. Found by machinery and men, by cranes and bulldozers, by people wearing masks and passing buckets, by the smell of death. I think of the people on the hijacked airplanes who got up that morning, Sept.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | By Michelle Jeffery INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Students at Indian Crest Junior High School will be allowed to skip classes tomorrow to attend the funeral of a 14-year-old classmate who died last week of a disease related to bacterial meningitis, a school spokeswoman said yesterday. The funeral for eighth grader Mike Musselman, who died Thursday, will be at noon at Christ Reformed Church at Indian Creek, Cowpath and Church Roads, Telford. Students must have a note from a parent to be dismissed from school, said Souderton Area School District spokeswoman Ellen Jamison.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | by John M. Baer, Daily News Staff Writer
Former Gov. Robert P. Casey, whose generation-long influence on Pennsylvania politics grew so powerful his surname became a political asset, died last night after a long hospitalization. Casey, 68, died at Mercy Hospital in Scranton. He is survived by his wife, Ellen, eight grown children and 28 grandchildren. The two-term Democratic governor died of complications related to his long battle with a rare genetic disease - familial amyloidosis - for which treatment included a heart-liver transplant in 1993.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Think forgetting to take one birth-control pill is no big deal? Think again. Missing just one pill a month decreases the pill's efficacy from nearly 100 percent to about 94 percent. Miss two or more pills, and you're rolling the dice, according to statistics from the Alan Guttmacher Institute. And it's essential not only to take the pill daily, but also to take it at the same time of day. That's probably why there are about 1 million pregnancies each year in the United States of women who are on the pill but have used it incorrectly.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | By Patricia M. La Hay, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
An inmate at the Bucks County correctional facility, who had been hospitalized with respiratory problems, was diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease, county commissioners said yesterday. The unnamed inmate was reported recovering and has been returned to the prison. County Health Director Lewis D. Polk said an environmental firm that specializes in microbial identification and remediation would be at the prison today to investigate the source of the disease. Legionnaires' disease - a serious and sometimes fatal bacterial infection that causes pneumonia and flu-like symptoms - is spread through moist air from contaminated water sources, such as air-conditioning systems, showers and whirlpool baths.
NEWS
June 2, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
College freshmen living in dormitories are more likely to get lost on campus, drink more alcohol, gain more weight - and contract potentially deadly meningitis. New data from a nationwide study shows that while college students in general are not at increased risk for meningococcal disease, an inflammation of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord, freshman living in dormitories have a 6.33 times higher risk, according to findings announced yesterday at the annual meeting of the American College Health Association.
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