FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
November 7, 1990 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Staff Writer
The 76ers' first two games of the regular season each resulted in a single, unalterable victory, but, to paraphrase noted NBA expert Yogi Berra, the similarities in the games were very different. One victory was on the road, the other at home; one came against a good team, the other against a weak one; one was gained impressively, the other less so. A consistent strain through the two diverse melodies, however, was the Sixers' frustrating penchant for giving away the basketball.
SPORTS
March 8, 2001 | by Les Bowen Daily News Sports Writer
For the Flyers, even good injury news has a way of turning bad. The story yesterday was supposed to be the return to practice of winger John LeClair, seven weeks into treatment for a postsurgical staph infection. Instead, LeClair left the team practice facility before his teammates took the ice; a rash he developed from his intravenous treatments must clear up before LeClair dons equipment. Meanwhile, also missing the practice was durable centerman Daymond Langkow, who has played in every one of the Flyers' 205 scheduled regular-season games since he was traded here from Tampa on Dec. 12, 1998, and 227 in a row overall.
NEWS
February 22, 2002 | By Peter Sigal INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Desiree Mitchell doesn't want to be in a dermatologist's office on a weekday morning, listening to talk of scratch tests, skin samples and throat washes. The 11-year-old with green sparkles in her hair would rather be with her fifth-grade class at Richland Elementary School in Quakertown. But the itchy, burning rash she has had since Jan. 31 will not go away. So she submits, grudgingly, to the tests that Dr. Norman L. Sykes has arranged in his quest to explain the mysterious rashes that have afflicted hundreds of schoolchildren in the Philadelphia area - and similar numbers nationwide.
NEWS
June 29, 2014 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
Dennis Nippins, 6, of Maple Shade, was in his third week of kindergarten when an angry red rash appeared on his right ankle. The rash at first resembled poison ivy but without the typical fluid-filled pustules. It turned into a wider circular pattern, then bubbled up into welts that eventually became scabs. Once the scabs vanished, the cycle started again. At the pediatrician's, the doctor diagnosed poison ivy. But four visits later, the rash remained on the boy's ankles and had spread to his arms, legs, face, scalp-even the inside of his ears.
NEWS
August 12, 2013 | By Robert Holtzman, For The Inquirer
One in an occasional series on attempts to solve a medical mystery. In early May, a young woman began feeling fatigued and developed a mild cough and sore throat. She attributed it to a mild cold and her busier work schedule and pushed through her symptoms. When she started vomiting and having fevers a week later, she went to her doctor's office and, subsequently, the emergency room. She was told she had a stomach bug and a urine infection and was given an antibiotic. The drug did not help, and a week later, she was still having high fevers every afternoon, with sweats that soaked her clothes and simultaneous chills that rattled her teeth as she huddled in bed. When she noticed a rash on her arms and legs, she became even more concerned and went back to her primary doctor.
NEWS
July 18, 1993 | By Christine Bahls, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
As Police Capt. Jack Robinson put it, people leave "the damnedest things in their cars. " And the thieves are finding them. During the last 10 days, at least five vans, some with out-of-state license plates, have been broken into by enterprising thieves who are stealing everything from carpenters' and plumbers' tools to cash. Robinson said his department was seeing a rash of van break-ins. Some of the vans are parked at motels and owned by travelers or laborers who come into the area to do a job. "They stay at a motel overnight.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | By Wendy Walker, Special to The Inquirer
The rash of burglaries and thefts from vehicles continues in Kennett Square. "They're knocking our socks off," said Police Chief Albert McCarthy. McCarthy suspects that the thieves wander along the railroad tracks that split the town, steal from houses, backyard sheds and cars and trucks nearby and sell the goods to buy illegal drugs. "I call them 'convenience thefts,' " McCarthy said. He said most occurred within a few hundred yards of the tracks, and most of the items stolen - power tools, stereo equipment and car radios, for instance - can easily be sold.
SPORTS
April 8, 2007 | By Rick O'Brien INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Hurt by a rash of penalties, including several down the stretch, Holy Ghost Prep gave up four power-play goals and bowed to North Allegheny, 6-3, yesterday in the Pennsylvania Cup AAA state championship game at IceWorks in Aston. Breaking open a 3-3 game, quick-skating junior forward Joshua Herbert had a natural hat trick in the final 2 1/2 minutes to give North Allegheny, the Penguins Cup champion, its first state title. The Firebirds (19-4-2) were whistled for four penalties in the last eight minutes.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Ronald Goren, For The Inquirer
A 38-year-old Philadelphia man came in to the emergency room in mid-September 2015 with achiness, headache and a faint rash. He had a low-grade fever, but it was no higher than 100°F. Until this point, he was a healthy man, and his physical exam was completely normal except for a faint rash on his torso and extremities. Because of the rash, I admitted him for monitoring. The rash faded within a couple of days, but he continued to have the same symptoms, joined by loss of appetite, nausea and profound weakness.
NEWS
September 15, 2014 | BY PATRICIA MADEJ, Daily News Staff Writer madejp@phillynews.com, 215-854-5938
STUDENTS AT Temple University are itching to know what's causing a mysterious skin rash. Over the past year, there have been 100 to 120 complaints to the university's Student Health Services of a mysterious irritation on the backs of students' legs that causes itching, redness and large bumps, said Mark Denys, senior administrator at the center. Denys said the rash is a contact dermatitis, but he's not sure of the exact cause. Some students with the rashes are speculating that they are coming from two wooden benches just north of the turnstile on the southbound side of the Cecil B. Moore subway platform on the Broad Street Line - the stop closest to the school.
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NEWS
July 11, 2016
Police in Bucks County are investigating a rash of home burglaries in Morrisville early Saturday. Four burglaries occurred between 3 a.m. to 8 a.m. on Simons Drive, the Falls Township Police Department said. Meanwhile, two attempted burglaries occurred on nearby Gilbert Drive, which is the next street to the west of Simons. The burglar or burglars got into the four homes through unlocked, rear windows, police said. Wallets, cash, cellphones and laptop computers were taken, among other items.
NEWS
June 6, 2016 | By Ronald Goren, For The Inquirer
A 38-year-old Philadelphia man came in to the emergency room in mid-September 2015 with achiness, headache and a faint rash. He had a low-grade fever, but it was no higher than 100°F. Until this point, he was a healthy man, and his physical exam was completely normal except for a faint rash on his torso and extremities. Because of the rash, I admitted him for monitoring. The rash faded within a couple of days, but he continued to have the same symptoms, joined by loss of appetite, nausea and profound weakness.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I seem to be allergic to latex, as I get a rash whenever I put on dishwashing gloves - but I want to paint my living room. Are there other environmentally safe options to latex paint? - K A: I am very sorry you have to deal with this. Allergic responses to latex products aren't unusual, but they can range from a very serious reaction to an irritating rash. If you suspect you're allergic to latex, you should visit a doctor. The good news - as far as your living room goes - is that what we've been calling "latex" paint hasn't had real latex in it for a long time.
NEWS
July 27, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
On a sunny May afternoon, dressed for the heat in shorts and a T-shirt, I yanked stubborn vines from long-ignored trees and shrubs, making way for a new flower bed. After four hours of effort, I felt pretty pleased with the result. Those good feelings, however, didn't last. About 85 percent of the population is allergic to poison ivy, and 10 percent to 15 percent are extremely allergic, according to the American Skin Association. I learned that I fell squarely in the second camp.
NEWS
July 26, 2015 | By Daniel R. Taylor, For The Inquirer
As she rocked her 4-month-old infant in her arms, a visually upset young mother said, "I think my baby is falling apart and so am I. " A quick glance at this previously healthy child confirmed her fears. "He was doing great for the first few months and was so happy, but ever since I weaned him from breast feeding to formula to go back to work, he has almost become unrecognizable," she said. "He is constantly crying, is having diarrhea, and has this horrible rash on his face. I think his hair is coming out as well.
NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Dr. Daniel Taylor, For The Inquirer
The pediatric resident I was overseeing in our busy sick clinic at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children hurriedly described the 2-year-old he had just seen with a rash on his trunk. "I think the child's been beaten," the resident said to me, wide-eyed and somewhat shaken. "He has several long, dark lines on his back and stomach. It looks like slap marks. " Child abuse and neglect is the dark side of pediatrics that is seen all too often. There are telltale signs, "red flags" that alert pediatricians to the possibility a child has been intentionally abused: bruising in a child who isn't yet crawling; marks on areas where there are no bony prominences, such as the ears, neck, and, like our patient, the trunk.
NEWS
April 5, 2015 | By Dr. Lucy E. Hornstein, For The Inquirer
She was 80 years old, and her blood pressure was out of control. She didn't care about that, though. She was more concerned about her feet. They had been red for a couple of months, and now they were getting "tingly. " They didn't hurt, and they weren't swollen. On exam, there was some redness of the tops of her feet that cut off abruptly just before her toes. There was some similar reddish discoloration of her knees as well. Her feet weren't swollen, and they had good circulation. I was much more concerned about her irregular heartbeat, so by the time I finished with an EKG (which was fine)
NEWS
March 15, 2015 | By Dr. Lucy E. Hornstein, For The Inquirer
A 45-year-old man came to see me because of a rash on his nose. It had appeared the day before. It hurt a little and itched a bit, though it was more annoying than anything else. He had no other skin concerns and felt fine otherwise. No fevers, chills, night sweats, or weight loss. Nothing. I examined the skin on his nose: There were perfectly demarcated oval patches of redness on the sides of both nostrils, completely symmetrical. There was some blistering and yellowish crusting, as well.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Midafternoon on a recent Friday, the New Jersey chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics e-mailed its membership that it would hold a webinar on measles. By the time registration closed at 6 p.m. that Sunday, 219 doctors had signed up for the next morning's presentation - more watched in groups - and another session had to be scheduled for later in the week. Fifteen years after measles was officially eliminated from the United States, most young doctors have never seen an actual case.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Dr. Charitha Gowda, For The Inquirer
The man felt foolish sitting in the waiting room of the Travel Medicine clinic. He didn't understand why his wife had insisted that he go see the doctor. After all, he was starting to feel better, and didn't she realize that he was already overworked at the office, trying to sift through the jumble of unattended cases that had piled up during their two-week jaunt to the Caribbean? He already felt as if it had been months since he had swum in the Atlantic Ocean, tried parasailing, and hiked around beautiful hills and waterfalls.
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