CollectionsRat Poison
IN THE NEWS

Rat Poison

FIND MORE STORIES »
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 24, 1986 | By Daniel LeDuc and Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Staff Writers
A Food and Drug Administration official said yesterday that federal investigators had found traces of rat poison in a ninth capsule of medicine among those removed from store shelves in Orlando, Fla., and Houston. FDA spokesman Bill Grigg said yesterday that analysts examining three types of drugs - Contac, Teldrin and Dietac - discovered the ninth tainted capsule Saturday night. The poison was found in a capsule of Teldrin, an allergy medicine. Meanwhile, FBI agents reported no new developments in their investigation into the tainted capsules, which are manufactured by Philadelphia-based SmithKline Beckman Corp.
NEWS
January 8, 1992 | By Peter Finn, Special to The Inquirer
Somewhere between Delaware Bay and Chincoteague, Va., from the shoreline to 40 miles out to sea - an area twice the size of New Jersey - some rat poison is missing. As yet no reward has been offered, and none is likely, but the Coast Guard is looking for information leading to its safe return to basement corners and attics, under kitchen sinks and other parts where Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus hang out. Our story begins on a dark and stormy night. Last Friday night through Saturday morning, when a vicious storm hit the New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland shores, the Santa Clara, a 492-foot ship out of Panama, was trundling from New York to Baltimore.
NEWS
March 22, 1986 | By Gilbert M. Gaul, James Asher and Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writers
SmithKline Beckman Corp. said yesterday that FBI agents had found small amounts of rat poison in capsules of its popular cold remedy Contac and in another of its popular consumer drugs. The Philadelphia company ordered an immediate national recall of Contac, the allergy medicine Teldrin and the appetite suppressant Dietac. Consumers were asked to destroy the drugs or return them to SmithKline or to the retail outlet where they were purchased. Henry Wendt, president and chief executive officer of SmithKline, said that warfarin, an anti-coagulant used in rat poison, was detected yesterday in five capsules of Contac and Teldrin.
NEWS
March 22, 1986 | By VINCE KASPER and EDWARD MORAN, Daily News Staff Writers
Contac, one of the leading cold remedies, and two other over-the-counter medications were recalled from the nation's store shelves yesterday after rat poison was found in eight capsules. All three are manufactured by SmithKline Beckman Corp. at its Philadelphia plant, 15th and Spring Garden streets. The company recalled the products voluntarily. "We're dealing with a deliberate, terrorist, criminal act," Frank Young, commissioner of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, said.
NEWS
March 20, 2003 | By Larry Lewis, Keith Herbert and Larry King INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
A Quakertown man who swallowed rat poison before calling police to his girlfriend's apartment was charged yesterday with murdering the woman and her daughter, 4, and hiding their bodies. Montgomery County District Attorney Bruce L. Castor Jr. said Evyonne Patterson, 23, and her child, Nila, were found strangled in the bedroom closets of their small apartment late Tuesday night. Police charged Patterson's longtime boyfriend, Ian Scott Wireman, 23, with two counts each of first-degree murder, third-degree murder, and abuse of a corpse.
NEWS
March 12, 1993 | By Mike Franolich, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Four eighth-grade students at a Cape May County middle school face charges that they used rat poison to sicken two of their teachers, police said. The teachers were not seriously injured. The teachers, both women whom police declined to identify, drank the tainted coffee on Wednesday, said Cape May County Prosecutor Stephen Moore. They became ill and sought treatment by their personal physicians yesterday, said Lower Township Police Detective Mike Brogan. The poisoning occurred about 11:30 a.m. Wednesday in an eighth-grade classroom at Richard M. Teitelmam Middle School in the Erma section of the township, Brogan said.
NEWS
August 26, 2009 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To Rhonda Thomas, a seasoned SPCA humane officer, the 28 cats in two stifling rooms in the Harleysville house appeared afraid and distressed, but she had seen worse. She planned to return for them the next day when she had help. Then she saw blue pellets in the food dishes and knew the animals had been offered rat poison; quickly, she summoned three ambulances to rush the animals to Montgomery County's three shelters. Yesterday, 27 of the cats were recovering after receiving vitamin K injections.
NEWS
March 26, 1986 | By Terry Bivens, Inquirer Staff Writer
Spurred by the prospect of a $900,000 reward, more than 1,000 people yesterday telephoned a new hotline for callers with information that might lead to the capture of the person or persons responsible for lacing three SmithKline Beckman Corp. products with minute amounts of rat poison. Meanwhile, the Philadelphia pharmaceutical manufacturer said yesterday that it has suspended production of the three drugs at its plant at 15th and Spring Garden Streets. Officials said the company still plans to resume sales of the drugs.
NEWS
July 16, 1997 | by Ramona Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
It was murder most fowl, the way Jeanne Smith tells the story. When chickens toddled away from her Northeast Philadelphia back yard, something strange happened. She says her next-door neighbor fatally bludgeoned and poisoned some of them. But was it poultricide, or did the chickens simply pick into poison set for rats? Either way, the demise of Jeanne Smith's chickens has become the center of a nasty dispute between Somerton neighbors. A Municipal Court judge has scheduled a hearing for tomorrow.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1986 | The Inquirer Staff
The costs of recalling three products involved in tampering and of an early-retirement program depressed earnings of SmithKline Beckman Corp. for the first quarter, the company said yesterday. The two events together reduced net income by $28.9 million or 37 cents a share to $1.51 a share versus $1.66 a share a year earlier. Without the charges, per-share earnings would have been $1.88 a share, the company said. After taxes, profits for the quarter were $116.4 million, compared with $131.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 31, 2013 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Maximus Golson nearly died Saturday morning. "He's energetic," said Antwin Golson, who raised the 18-month-old miniature Doberman pinscher from a puppy. So on Friday, when he noticed Max lying listlessly in a corner, "I knew something was wrong. " Golson, 15, a sophomore at Bodine High School for International Affairs, left messages for his veterinarian and stayed up all night with the dog. At daylight, Max stopped breathing. Golson scooped him up and ran to his step-grandfather in a panic.
NEWS
April 29, 2012 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bald eagle was lying on its back in a pool of blood in, of all places, a Broomall parking lot. Joe Simmonds, the maintenance man at Congregation Beth El-Ner Tamid, spotted its dark form as he emptied trash into a Dumpster. He put a traffic cone by the huge bird so no one would run over it, and he called 911. The bird was breathing. It was alive, just barely. Wildlife officials trying to coax it back to health now think the male eagle was beset by a triple dose of misfortune.
NEWS
August 5, 2011 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The family of a computer engineer who was fatally poisoned has filed a wrongful-death lawsuit alleging that Bristol-Myers Squibb and the University Medical Center at Princeton were negligent and contributed to his death. The lawsuit, made public Thursday, comes less than four months after Tianle Li, 40, a chemist who worked for the pharmaceutical giant for a decade, was charged with the murder of her husband, Xiaoye Wang, 39, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania who came from China to the United States seeking a better life.
NEWS
August 28, 2009 | By Matthew Spolar INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As about 40 people looked on, a Camden activist climbed the step at 923 N. 27th St. in the city's Cramer Hill section yesterday and tacked a bright-orange "Imminent Hazard" sign to the entrance of the abandoned shell. It wasn't easy. The unhinged door, propped against piles of debris inside the ruined home, nearly caved in at the touch. The house was the newly crowned "winner" of a contest devised by Camden Churches Organized for the People (CCOP), in which residents cast votes to decide which of 13 abandoned properties was the area's "ugliest house.
NEWS
August 26, 2009 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
To Rhonda Thomas, a seasoned SPCA humane officer, the 28 cats in two stifling rooms in the Harleysville house appeared afraid and distressed, but she had seen worse. She planned to return for them the next day when she had help. Then she saw blue pellets in the food dishes and knew the animals had been offered rat poison; quickly, she summoned three ambulances to rush the animals to Montgomery County's three shelters. Yesterday, 27 of the cats were recovering after receiving vitamin K injections.
SPORTS
April 6, 2009 | By John Gonzalez, Inquirer Columnist
While wondering how the Big East got shut out of tonight's NCAA championship, it's time for an all-college hoops edition of the mailbag . . . - Mary Pat MP, Villanova played its best basketball of the year against UCLA, Duke and Pitt - that's why I never anticipated the UNC game unfolding that way. You're right. 'Nova never looked comfortable. But there's no shame in losing in the Final Four. Hang in there. The pain will subside eventually. - Charlie Charlie, Bless your heart.
NEWS
December 15, 2007
THERE IS NO better way for a liberal Jew to burnish his or her liberal credentials than to knock Israel publicly. It tells the world that you are open-minded enough to hate your own, which is what liberalism really is all about. So it's not surprising that we find an op-ed by Carol Towarnicky hailing the writings of Alice Rothchild ("Rx for Mideast Peace"). No, crazed Israelis don't kill and torture innocent Palestinians on their way to the mosque. There are roadblocks and security fences because there are Palestinian suicide bombers - remember them?
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|