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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1986 | By David Bianculli, Inquirer TV Critic
While viewers are watching (or spurning) the new prime-time series this fall, the networks will be watching their programming beachheads erode or strengthen. Each show's placement in the schedule, as well as its rating, has become increasingly important. The biggest and best example of the individual significance of each time slot is a tale of two cities - Dallas vs. Miami Vice. They'll battle to the death Fridays at 9 p.m., and one show will emerge as the hero and be showered with glory.
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | By Jim Benson, Los Angeles Daily News
The sharks smell blood. In this case, the predators are syndicators that sell original first-run, non-network shows to TV stations around the country. Their prey is the hemorrhaging new series "USA Today: The Television Show," the much-ballyhooed program that, during its first three weeks, was clobbered in the ratings and beaten senseless by the nation's TV critics. As the program (airing in here at 1:30 a.m. on Channel 3) staggers into its fourth week, competitors scurry to come up with a replacement should efforts to revive the video cousin of newspaper USA Today fail.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By ROBERT STRAUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
Back in 1964, the TV networks and their two ratings services, Arbitron and Nielsen, got together for an unusual summit to determine how to regulate ratings to help advertisers. The summit produced the concept of "sweeps months," times when Nielsen and Arbitron would conduct more intense audience surveys than normal. The months chosen were May (because it comes just before the summer buying time for fall series), November (to give new fall shows a few weeks to gain viewers), and February (to give "second-season" shows that same opportunity)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
"Good Morning America" (weekdays at 7 a.m. on Channel 6) slid past the "Today" show (weekdays at 7 a.m. on Channel 3) in the ratings for the first time in 14 weeks. According to the Nielsen national ratings for the five-day period of March 17 through 21, "GMA" scored a 5.7 rating and a 24 share, while "Today" came in second with a 5.5/23 and the "CBS Morning News" limped in third with a 3.2/14. (A rating point is equal to 859,000 households. The share is the percentage of sets in use tuned to a particular show.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1986 | By JOSEPH P. BLAKE, Daily News Staff Writer
It's still a tight race for second place between the news divisions of Channels 3 and 10, while Channel 6's "Action News" continues on its winning way, according to the A.C. Nielsen ratings. Here's how the local stations competed in the November sweeps period between Oct. 30 and Nov. 26. 5-5:30 p.m. - Channel 6, the only local television station still airing news at 5 p.m., scored a 12.7 rating and a 26 share; Channel 3 ("Newlywed Game") had a 10.3/21; and Channel 10, which airs reruns of "Magnum" from 4:30-5:30 p.m., scored a 7.0/16.
NEWS
June 10, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adam Lambert: No surprise, I'm gay It took American Idol Season 2 runner-up Clay Aiken five years - five years of dodging reporters' questions, tabloid rumors and innuendos - to come out of the closet as a gay American man in September 2008. Adam Lambert, 27, on the other hand, has announced in the new issue of Rolling Stone mag that he is also a gay American man - barely five minutes after he was announced as the Season 8 runner-up. "I don't think it should be a surprise for anyone to hear I'm gay," Adam says.
NEWS
January 28, 1995
A DUMB FLAP It was dumb for Newt Gingrich's mother to think she could stage-whisper the House Speaker's alleged opinion of Hillary to millions of the TV viewing audience. It was dumb and contrived of the scheming Connie Chung to take advantage of her - or did she? It was also dumb of the first lady to invite Newt and his mama to the White House for tea - too conciliatory and phony. Equally dumb is the fuss made over it in the ratings war. Who really cares in two-faced Washington, where you pretend to be political allies but are really secret enemies, where honesty is a forgotten word?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1986 | By KAY GARDELLA, New York Daily News
Once again, as we enter November, we are about to be swept away, as the networks and local stations start tossing out their high cards in the poker game known as "sweeps month. " It's during these months, the others being February and May, that ratings are tabulated on which the next few months of advertising prices are based. So it is, with television being a bottom-line business, we are usually bombarded during the sweeps with glitz and glamor and fanfare and specials and gut-issue reports and high-drama regular episodes and anything else the networks and stations can offer that will attract the largest number of viewers imaginable.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "New Q-102" just got newer. Yesterday, in a quest to "take the station to the next level," WIOQ-FM (102.1) operations manager Mark Driscoll and general manager Gil Rozzo canned two jocks and the production director to bring in people with even more "off-the-wall" personalities. The hard-driving contemporary dance music will remain unchanged, said Driscoll. "Year One was start up; Year Two is grow up," said Driscoll, noting that yesterday's bombshell had been quietly in the works for weeks.
NEWS
October 16, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
"G-o-o-d m-o-r-n-i-n-g to Tina Christmas, wife of Rev. James Christmas," says Art Douglas in his comfortable baritone. "The mother of three lovely children, she's very active in the church and community affairs. She's the superintendent of Mount Zion Baptist Church Sunday school, also the choir director, a missionary, and she's a member of the Concerned Parents of Coatesville. "She works at Philadelphia Electric in Caln. And the Pastors' Aid Society would like to say, 'Happy birthday!
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SPORTS
August 17, 2011
Mike Missanelli's drive-time radio talk show, which is simulcast on 950-AM and 97.5-FM the Fanatic, drew far more targeted listeners than Howard Eskin's WIP-AM drive-time radio show in July, according to Arbitron ratings. Eskin announced Monday that he will be stepping down from his long-running show in the next month to pursue other broadcasting opportunities. Andy Bloom, WIP's program director, said Monday that Eskin's departure was unrelated to ratings and that Eskin was ahead of Missanelli in his time slot.
NEWS
June 10, 2009 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Adam Lambert: No surprise, I'm gay It took American Idol Season 2 runner-up Clay Aiken five years - five years of dodging reporters' questions, tabloid rumors and innuendos - to come out of the closet as a gay American man in September 2008. Adam Lambert, 27, on the other hand, has announced in the new issue of Rolling Stone mag that he is also a gay American man - barely five minutes after he was announced as the Season 8 runner-up. "I don't think it should be a surprise for anyone to hear I'm gay," Adam says.
NEWS
June 10, 1999
Better bring a book to read if you're waiting in line for an R-rated movie and moviegoers around you are toting backpacks and popping bubble gum. It may take a while to card those teens who aren't accompanied by their parents - as the nation's largest theater-owner association now pledges to do more vigorously. But the attempt to shield the under-17 crowd from movie sleaze and violence is worth the longer wait. Since the link between viewing violent images and aggressive behavior is well-established, enforcing the movie ratings at the box office seems the bare minimum required.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1996 | By Reid Kanaley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer wire services contributed to this report
In what one analyst described as a "strategic retrenchment," CompuServe, the granddaddy of the commercial online services, has decided it will not compete with America Online and other services that are slashing rates to draw subscribers. The company also said it would kill its family-oriented WOW! service effective Jan. 31. The service was started in March, but had attracted only about 100,000 subscribers. "We are walking away from the bloodbath in the mass-consumer market in which hundreds of millions of dollars are being spent" in marketing efforts to gain subscribers, Scott Kauffman, CompuServe's vice president of interactive services, said yesterday in explaining the new strategy.
NEWS
January 28, 1995
A DUMB FLAP It was dumb for Newt Gingrich's mother to think she could stage-whisper the House Speaker's alleged opinion of Hillary to millions of the TV viewing audience. It was dumb and contrived of the scheming Connie Chung to take advantage of her - or did she? It was also dumb of the first lady to invite Newt and his mama to the White House for tea - too conciliatory and phony. Equally dumb is the fuss made over it in the ratings war. Who really cares in two-faced Washington, where you pretend to be political allies but are really secret enemies, where honesty is a forgotten word?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1992 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
CBS is winning the ratings war, ABC is gaining, NBC is hurting, as the 1992-93 TV season gets off to a muddled start. The top new shows on each network are CBS's Hearts Afire, ABC's Hangin' With Mr. Cooper, NBC's Mad About You and Fox's Martin, while NBC's Rhythm & Blues is the biggest disappointment. Larger disappointments: Total network viewing is down 3.2 percent. With the departure of The Cosby Show, NBC is getting hammered on Thursday nights, and its new shows are a bust on Fridays.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
The "New Q-102" just got newer. Yesterday, in a quest to "take the station to the next level," WIOQ-FM (102.1) operations manager Mark Driscoll and general manager Gil Rozzo canned two jocks and the production director to bring in people with even more "off-the-wall" personalities. The hard-driving contemporary dance music will remain unchanged, said Driscoll. "Year One was start up; Year Two is grow up," said Driscoll, noting that yesterday's bombshell had been quietly in the works for weeks.
NEWS
October 16, 1989 | By Joe Logan, Inquirer Staff Writer
"G-o-o-d m-o-r-n-i-n-g to Tina Christmas, wife of Rev. James Christmas," says Art Douglas in his comfortable baritone. "The mother of three lovely children, she's very active in the church and community affairs. She's the superintendent of Mount Zion Baptist Church Sunday school, also the choir director, a missionary, and she's a member of the Concerned Parents of Coatesville. "She works at Philadelphia Electric in Caln. And the Pastors' Aid Society would like to say, 'Happy birthday!
NEWS
October 5, 1988 | By Jim Benson, Los Angeles Daily News
The sharks smell blood. In this case, the predators are syndicators that sell original first-run, non-network shows to TV stations around the country. Their prey is the hemorrhaging new series "USA Today: The Television Show," the much-ballyhooed program that, during its first three weeks, was clobbered in the ratings and beaten senseless by the nation's TV critics. As the program (airing in here at 1:30 a.m. on Channel 3) staggers into its fourth week, competitors scurry to come up with a replacement should efforts to revive the video cousin of newspaper USA Today fail.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | By ROBERT STRAUSS, Daily News Staff Writer
Back in 1964, the TV networks and their two ratings services, Arbitron and Nielsen, got together for an unusual summit to determine how to regulate ratings to help advertisers. The summit produced the concept of "sweeps months," times when Nielsen and Arbitron would conduct more intense audience surveys than normal. The months chosen were May (because it comes just before the summer buying time for fall series), November (to give new fall shows a few weeks to gain viewers), and February (to give "second-season" shows that same opportunity)
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