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ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2000 | By Dan DeLuca, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They can't get away with that, can they? Oh, yes, they can. In this summer of raunchy humor, gross-out movies, eyebrow-raising commercials, and proudly obnoxious TV shows are obliterating boundaries of bad taste, united by a strategy that owes much to time-honored Madison Avenue shock tactics. Increasingly, hit comedies such as Scary Movie and The Nutty Professor II: The Klumps, Reebok's "Nate and Brian" TV ads, and Comedy Central's The Man Show, which recently celebrated its first anniversary, revolve around I-can't-believe-they-did-that vignettes calculated to ignite controversy and, in the case of movies, to attract 18- to 24-year-olds back for repeat viewings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2001 | By Desmond Ryan INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The teenage boy waves goodbye to his parents as they depart on a 10-day trip abroad and tries to keep the gleeful smile off his face as he savors his new freedom. But in Cesc Gay's Nico and Dani, Dani is still the prisoner of his adolescent desires and struggling with confusion over his sexuality. Most of us would probably prefer to forget the anxieties of coming of age, but filmmakers aren't about to let that happen. They remain irresistibly drawn to evoking it in vivid, painful detail.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1999 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
The new David Spade comedy Lost & Found abounds in bathroom humor. Teeth-gnashingly gross if intermittently hilarious, it follows Dylan, a restaurateur (Spade) who gets into deep doo-doo after he dognaps the terrier of a French dish, Lila (Sophie Marceau), whom he wants to date. By helping her look for the missing pooch, Dylan thinks he can worm himself into her shapely arms. Spade, whose character is an extension of that snark he plays on television's Just Shoot Me, is an acquired taste - like Limburger cheese.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1987 | By Jack Lloyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Back in the early 1970s, when George Carlin sported a ponytail and wore T- shirts on stage, he won notoriety by talking about the "seven dirty words" - the ones you would never hear on radio or television. And when a radio station played a monologue containing the words, it got into hot water with the Federal Communications Commission. Things have changed over the years, although the FCC recently put the squeeze on the raunchy chatter of such broadcasting personalities as Howard Stern.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Human cork Ed Helms bobs to the surface of the river of raunch that is Cedar Rapids , a gentle, gross-out comedy that tickles laughs from the misadventures of a small-town innocent at large in a midsize, Midwestern burg. In this broadest of farces, Helms ( Daily Show alum, The Office fixture, and member of The Hangover crew) delivers a performance of touching delicacy, one almost as remarkable as that of Tom Hanks in Big . Helms is Tim Lippe, boyish, pencil-necked, and sweater-vested, the most-trusted insurance agent in Brown Valley, Wis. Orphaned in his youth, Tim is unusually attached to his boss, Bill (Stephen Root)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2012
Music The Chandler Travis Philharmonic. This big band takes the stage in gaudy consignment-shop outfits that clash like cymbals; the hats alone are worth the price of admission. The Philharmonic's repertoire is free-range: rock, Dixieland jazz, bubblegum pop, ranchero, ska, and some genres unknown to man. Every song is played a little bit sloppy, and with absolute virtuosity. - David Hiltbrand   With Matt Wallace & the Blues performing at 8 p.m. Sunday at Dawson Street Pub, 100 Dawson St., Manayunk.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2000 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
Trying to offer a little humor on a Sunday night, The WB introduces two comedies that are certainly different. Hype, a sketch show with attention deficit disorder, goes at 9. Nikki, a strange sitcom named after star Nikki Cox, follows at 9:30. It's hard to imagine throngs flocking, but, like most TV executives, you never know. So why don't you get the same kind of big dough as most TV executives? Because you can just shrug your shoulders and change the channel. They have to go around trying to persuade everybody that shows such as Hype and Nikki are the perfect places to sell sneakers and tickets to the latest scary teen movie.
NEWS
August 28, 2011
A Book of Raunch By Nicholson Baker Simon & Schuster. 262 pp. $25 By David L. Ulin Nicholson Baker wasn't kidding when he subtitled House of Holes , his new novel, A Book of Raunch . Indeed, it's a bona fide filthfest, so unrelentingly graphic that there's not much I can quote from it in this review. At the same time, there's an innocence to House of Holes , which is (if such a thing is possible) a dirty book without prurience, intended less to titillate than to amuse.
SPORTS
June 24, 2008
COLLEGE AND high school students interested in sports-writing careers contact me from time to time seeking advice on how best to enter an industry in crisis. My inclination is to update the one-word, wink-wink, "Plastics" advice Benjamin Braddock received in "The Graduate. " Instead, I would substitute "Internet. " Or "Blog. " Or "Multimedia. " Or "Enlist. " I usually wind up counseling them to inhale education, hope for a job, then be prepared to do podcasts, Web blogs, obituaries, live TV, editing, brew the newsroom coffee and learn to be digital in all things.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Barring the end of the world (it didn't happen yesterday, did it?), or the even less likely scenario in which no one bothers to go out next weekend to see three guys wake up completely blotto, there will be a Hangover: Part III . "Obviously, it will depend on the success of the second one," says Bradley Cooper , whose participation in the inaugural Hangover had more than a little to do with his rocket launch to stardom. "You never know," Cooper adds, trying to sound cautious about the box-office prospects of the much-anticipated follow-up.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2012
Music The Chandler Travis Philharmonic. This big band takes the stage in gaudy consignment-shop outfits that clash like cymbals; the hats alone are worth the price of admission. The Philharmonic's repertoire is free-range: rock, Dixieland jazz, bubblegum pop, ranchero, ska, and some genres unknown to man. Every song is played a little bit sloppy, and with absolute virtuosity. - David Hiltbrand   With Matt Wallace & the Blues performing at 8 p.m. Sunday at Dawson Street Pub, 100 Dawson St., Manayunk.
NEWS
August 28, 2011
A Book of Raunch By Nicholson Baker Simon & Schuster. 262 pp. $25 By David L. Ulin Nicholson Baker wasn't kidding when he subtitled House of Holes , his new novel, A Book of Raunch . Indeed, it's a bona fide filthfest, so unrelentingly graphic that there's not much I can quote from it in this review. At the same time, there's an innocence to House of Holes , which is (if such a thing is possible) a dirty book without prurience, intended less to titillate than to amuse.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2011 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
Barring the end of the world (it didn't happen yesterday, did it?), or the even less likely scenario in which no one bothers to go out next weekend to see three guys wake up completely blotto, there will be a Hangover: Part III . "Obviously, it will depend on the success of the second one," says Bradley Cooper , whose participation in the inaugural Hangover had more than a little to do with his rocket launch to stardom. "You never know," Cooper adds, trying to sound cautious about the box-office prospects of the much-anticipated follow-up.
NEWS
April 16, 2011 | INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
ATLANTIC CITY - As much as any of the gamblers at the casinos last night, the less-than-capacity crowd that came out for Charlie Sheen's show was prepared for a crapshoot. "It could be great," Scott MacKay of Sparta said on the way into the Trump Taj Mahal's Etess Arena. Others were more optimistic. "I'm just here to see Charlie," said Heather Shirley of Philadelphia. "I've been a fan since his '80s movies - Lucas, Platoon, Hot Shots. I love the man. " Sheen will never be mistaken for a model of stability or consistency.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2011 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Human cork Ed Helms bobs to the surface of the river of raunch that is Cedar Rapids , a gentle, gross-out comedy that tickles laughs from the misadventures of a small-town innocent at large in a midsize, Midwestern burg. In this broadest of farces, Helms ( Daily Show alum, The Office fixture, and member of The Hangover crew) delivers a performance of touching delicacy, one almost as remarkable as that of Tom Hanks in Big . Helms is Tim Lippe, boyish, pencil-necked, and sweater-vested, the most-trusted insurance agent in Brown Valley, Wis. Orphaned in his youth, Tim is unusually attached to his boss, Bill (Stephen Root)
NEWS
July 30, 2009 | By GARY THOMPSON, thompsg@phillynews.com
The British have a particular genius for comedies about the workplace, and the perils of navigating bureaucracy. We've imported some of our best sitcoms ("The Office") from the U.K., and can watch other fine examples ("Yes, Minister," "Yes, Prime Minister,") on public television. Hollywood writers love to satirize the absurdity of the industrial-studio system. Across the pond, writers must push their scripts through the echelons of government-run television, where treachery and incompetence take different shapes.
SPORTS
June 24, 2008
COLLEGE AND high school students interested in sports-writing careers contact me from time to time seeking advice on how best to enter an industry in crisis. My inclination is to update the one-word, wink-wink, "Plastics" advice Benjamin Braddock received in "The Graduate. " Instead, I would substitute "Internet. " Or "Blog. " Or "Multimedia. " Or "Enlist. " I usually wind up counseling them to inhale education, hope for a job, then be prepared to do podcasts, Web blogs, obituaries, live TV, editing, brew the newsroom coffee and learn to be digital in all things.
NEWS
July 26, 2004 | By A.D. Amorosi FOR THE INQUIRER
To know Bloodhound Gang, Royersford's deceptively clever rap-rawkers, is to fly your freak flag for things lewd and rude: raging hop-and-pop songs about porn stars and feminine hygiene, gay jokes, and spit fights. To a sold-out TLA crowd on Friday, the first of three nights, that flag waved proudly. It was hard to tell who did more baiting - a bird-flipping audience or a band notorious for pranks and insults. When not extolling animalistic sex while watching the Discovery Channel (the electro-disco "The Bad Touch")
NEWS
March 15, 2003 | By Fawn Vrazo INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And now, for something completely different. Looking like a nation of crazed Wallace Beerys, Brits of all ages appeared in public yesterday with hairy red plastic noses stuck on the front of their real noses. Others did stranger things. Several people took public baths in tubs filled with baked beans. Men shaved their legs in stripy patterns. Men and women in fright wigs jogged across the Thames. An entire class of police recruits posed with red noses beneath their bobby hats.
NEWS
November 27, 2002 | By Carrie Rickey INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Let others deck the halls with boughs of holly and light the Hanukkah candles. Humbugs who hate the holidays prefer to spend December scrooging. Davey Stone, for one. "I hate folks who think reindeer are cute. For me they're something to shoot," sings the angriest young man in Dukesberry, the New England hamlet that's home to Adam Sandler's 8 Crazy Nights. This subversive animated musical - imagine Chucky snowboarding into South Park and shattering its holiday ice sculptures - was conceived by Sandler as chicken soup for the sugarplum soul.
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